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I uploaded my first-ever YouTube video today, and within minutes it was blocked due to copyright violation. It included footage of the World Cup final (footage from ABC) and was just over 3 minutes in duration.

I'm wondering why FIFA and/or YouTube would block this content, considering there are dozens of videos with World Cup footage already posted on YouTube. Should the rule not be the same for everyone?
 

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So how are they still there days later? Mine was removed within minutes. Doesn't make sense.
 

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That's YouTube for you. For *certain* videos, I've read that they run some type of script to find (and delete) videos with copyright material, but it may take several days to complete. On the other hand, anyone could have reported that your video was in copyright violation, which may have accelerated the process.

The same held true for all those Hitler subtitle spoofs - a large number of them started disappearing a little while back, but there are still a bunch of them out there if you do a search.
 

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YOuTube is just obeying the law. As Tezster noted, many will be gone in the future.

The interesting thing is how they figure out which ones contain copyright material.
 

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It also depend on the source for the material. For example, ABC may have asked YouTube to remove all content recorded from its stations. Canadian networks (such as CBC) and overseas networks may allow limited use of videos sourced from their stations or have no restrictions placed on YouTube postings. FIFA may also place restrictions on postings of World Cup material (or not.) IIRC, use of video clips up to 25 seconds is allowed (as part of a larger program) under US and Canadian copyright. Over that, permission must be obtained.
 

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A lot of copyright holders place a special code in their signal - a sort of digital signature. It's used for a lot of things, not just determining copyright infringement.

Anyway, the Youtube software matches the signature to what it has on file. It can't detect whether a video like yours would fall under the exceptions to copyright law, so it removes it to be on the "safe" side.

I think there's some sort of form you can fill out on youtube.com to challenge a copyright removal, but it opens you up to legal action if is determined to be infringement and FIFA decides to go that route.
 

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Scarybob and kirjtc2 have it exactly right.

Depending on where you got the signal from, it has an identifier embedded in it.
This identifier is undetectable by humans, but it can be picked up by computers (even after you re-encode, sometimes)

The signal is the 'new century' way of recording TV viewing habits (e.g. Nielson viewers) - instead of having to press buttons and all that to determine what you're watching, the new tech uses a recording device (like a mic) to listen to what you're actually watching, for how long, do you change the channel at commercials, PVR it and watch later, etc. (or at least tv viewing polls is one use for it that I know of.. it may serve other uses too)

Using this signal, the networks (or possibly even individual channels) can input the ID and have youtube perform a scan. If your clip is long enough to have the readable code, it might get picked up.
However, if the clip is short enough or its a remix, etc. You can probably make a dispute and someone will manually check your video to see if its within creative rights or not and you might get it put back up.

Generally, the US stations all use this technology. As far as I know, most Canadian channels do not (yet), or at least don't have youtube scan for it.
 
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