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Discussion Starter #1
Because my HD draws close to 350 Watts I tend to watch my HD set only when something pretty special is on, otherwise I'll watch it on an SD set.
So you are saying that you will watch something in SD rather than HD to save something like 5 cents per hour on your electrical bill? Is this for environmental or economic reasons?
 

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Wayne: Is this for environmental or economic reasons?
I consider myself to be an integral part of the environment, also a retiree on a fixed income, so I'd have to say both. Besides, if electricity is as cheap as you imply, why are so many people now complaining it is too expensive?

Remember, when we look after the pennies the dollars tend to look after themselves. The same goes for the environment and our well being.

With this in mind, Auto HD works for me.
 

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Sorry to be getting a bit off topic, but you said that your HDTV consumes 350W. Let's assume that your SDTV consumes 100W, that has to be way too low but let's go with that. Therefore by watching SD rather than HD you are saving 0.25kW. Let's also assume that you pay 20 cents per kWh for your electricity cost, which is again overly conservative (by conservative meant my estimate is on the high side). Therefore you are saving 5 cents per hour by watching SD.

So if you take my numbers to be true (and I am guessing that my estimate is at least 50% too high) then the utility of watching a program in HD vs SD is not worth 5 cents per hour to you? I find that rather hard to believe, but to each his own.
 

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Wayne: I try not to deal in assumptions so, I checked the real numbers. My SD consumes 80W and my HD consumes 450W (I mistakenly said 350W earlier) saving .37kW. I pay 9.9¢ per kWh peak but that equates to 24.75¢ per kWh when delivery, regulatory, debt retirement charges,and HST are included. [email protected]$0.2475=$0.092 per hour.

Therefore my SD consumes only 17.8% of the electricity my HD does. If this isn't important why do we replace our incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs when they consume an enormous 25% of the electricity the incandescents do?

Who'd a thunk AutoHD (the topic) could be linked to CFLs? This may be fun but I'm sure 57 is just hovering over the kill button to shut us down if it goes on. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok, let's move this to the Anything Else forum but I am shocked that any TV uses only 80W of power. Is this a CRT TV?
 

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How about just watching a smaller HDTV to save energy? LCD sets tend to be more energy efficient than CRT sets. I once owned a 19" Trinitron set that gave off so much heat you could cook on it.
 

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Am I missing something, or are you still paying for the HD feed anyway, even though you decide to watch SD, it is still costing you money to have HD service.
 

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I refuse to watch SD when HD is available.
 

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I try not to deal in assumptions so, I checked the real numbers. My SD consumes 80W and my HD consumes 450W (I mistakenly said 350W earlier) saving .37kW. I pay 9.9¢ per kWh peak but that equates to 24.75¢ per kWh when delivery, regulatory, debt retirement charges,and HST are included.
Are your wattage figures actual readings (taken using a "Kill-A-Watt" meter or some other true RMS wattmeter) or just what the labels on the sets say? Did you include any additional equipment used when watching, such as a set top box or receiver or even the lights that are on if the TVs are watched in different environments?

The delivery charge includes a fixed "customer charge" of $18.93 per month + HST (in Toronto). Did you remove this from the equation (since it won't change no mater how much your devices consume)?

Do you watch all of your TV during the on-peak periods? The HD vs. SD difference will change, slightly, when based on the rates during off-peak and mid-peak.

Do you pay a variable amount for your heating based on usage? If so, did you factor in the fact that the electricity used to watch TV converts to heat, which reduces your heating bill. This won't be a 100% 1:1 reduction because gas (if that's what you have) is cheaper than electricity, and the TV heat sources probably won't be ideal for proper balance, but it's still a, possibly significant, factor (during cold weather, at least).
 
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