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Discussion Starter #21
The only issue that concerns me now with the new CPU`s is the new motherboards and the P and H chipsets.
 

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If anything, the new Sandy Bridge CPUs are LGA1155 which, if Intel doesn't pull this same stunt again, should last longer than the now obsolete LGA1156. Later on you might be able to upgrade the CPU while with LGA1156 it appears to be the end of the road without much improvement. With the overclocking capabilities of many of these new chips, maybe CPU upgrades aren't an issue since there is less value in them.

Makes me feel not too bad about my 1 year old LGA775 Pentium Dual Core E5200 (2.5 overclocked to a very stable 3.0GHz). For my HTPC it performs well (no Blu-ray yet). At least I knew LGA775 was on its way out. LGA1156 is but a blip on the road now.

Apparently Ivy Bridge (22nm 4 core entry, 8 core higher market) will also use LGA1155. Based on this information I would go with LGA1155 if upgrading to the next gen is appealing to you. I got this info from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Bridge_(microarchitecture))
 

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Well, I decided to be an early adopter for this processor cycle, and so far I'm very impressed.

I went with the i5-2500K on an ASUS P8P67-M Pro motherboard, and the performance is a huge jump over my old Core 2 E6400 (2.4 GHz). Everything runs significantly faster, and the efficiency is remarkable: the whole machine (excluding monitor) pulls only 55W at the plug at idle.

I haven't tried overclocking yet, but from everything I've read 4.0 to 4.5 GHz (from the stock 3.3) is easily possible.

The ASUS motherboard uses the P67 chipset, so no QuickSync for me. In the end I decided that the on-board graphics enabled via the H67 chipset were just too anemic.
 

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Last weekend I upgraded to a Core i7 2600K + ASUS P8P67 Pro. I based my buying decisions on the various hardware review sites. To quote The Tech Report from their Sandy Bridge Processor review:

I'm not sure how coldly analytical I can be about this, because the Core i7-2600K with Hyper-Threading is frickin' awesome and you should totally get one, but you're free to spend less if you want to wuss out like that.
... and on the Sandy Bridge motherboard review ...

The P8P67 PRO has a few niggling flaws, but they're easily balanced by all the things the board does right. Among the four, the PRO feels like the most refined attempt at a next-generation motherboard. If we were building a desktop system with a Sandy Bridge CPU, that's exactly the kind of motherboard we'd want.
I was actually surprised that Gigabyte dropped the ball this generation of motherboards. For the past few chipset generations I've been buying Gigabyte motherboards and have been very happy with them.

That said, one brilliant thing that Asus does with their motherboards is those "Q-Connectors", and I wish other companies would emulate them. Without them, plugging in those individual front panel wires is extremely annoying, especially if you already have the motherboard installed in your case.

My new system is setup, overclocked to 4.4GHz, and it's very fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Thanks for the reviews guy. I am going to pull the trigger soon and it sounds like I am going to be getting a Sandy Bridge processor.
 

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I just upgraded my system to the i7 2600K + ASUS P8P67 Pro this morning, and it went well. However I was a bit confused with the idle temperature reading in the BIOS (44-53C) versus in Windows in AI Suite II (16-20C) but I read that the BIOS reading is not really an idle temperature. Regardless, I doubt I will be overclocking it but I still might buy a better cooler and replace the stock Intel cooler.

But I was definitely amazed with the new BIOS and support for the mouse in the BIOS...

Not my screen-grab BTW but it looks the same on the P8P67 Pro...

 

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Now that vendors are finally adopting UEFI, I'm curious on what the future will bring for interacting with motherboard settings. Right now, the interfaces are mostly just a front-end for the typical BIOS-style configuration screens, but I'm sure that will change over time.
 

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I just upgraded my system to the i7 2600K + ASUS P8P67 Pro this morning, and it went well. However I was a bit confused with the idle temperature reading in the BIOS (44-53C) versus in Windows in AI Suite II (16-20C) but I read that the BIOS reading is not really an idle temperature. Regardless, I doubt I will be overclocking it but I still might buy a better cooler and replace the stock Intel cooler.
I was initially surprised by the same thing--the ASUS UEFI reported the temperature almost 10C higher than AI Suite did once booted into Windows. It makes sense, however--no CPU power management is used when you're in the UEFI screens. This effect is particularly pronounced with Sandy Bridge CPUs due to their large ratio between idle and high-power states.
 

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A little late but another +1 for Sandy.

If doing a new build I would say yes. If you were looking to upgrade from i5/i7 then I would wait.

If you are looking for model specific info on parts OCFourms is a good place, tons of info and usually very quick acurate answers to questions like this (there is a place just for these kinds of questions actually).

The increase over Gen 1 is incremental from what I understand, not a giant leap, but it is better so worth looking at as a new build.

A number of people on that forum have Sandy systems so you should be able to get some real feedback instead of my i5 760 thoughts :p My 760 is @4GHz, but I hear Sandy clocks well if thats something you are thinking of doing.
 

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Note that some ASUS P8P67 users are experiencing a variety of issues, so you might want to check out the following hardforum threads discussing these issues. Note that an ASUS rep is actually communicating with users in this thread.

I also just experienced a sleep mode related BSOD whereby a Microsoft Hotfix is available.

Official ASUS BIOS and Program Updates: http://www.hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1578865
 

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I've had my Sandy build up for almost 2 weeks.

Running an Asus P8P67 Deluxe with the i7-2600k @ 4GHz. Still working on going higher on the OC, but not really sure I need to as anything I throw at it gets chewed up in a heart beat. I love gaming on this new machine (Radeon 6950 helps!), it's been a while since I've been interested in PC gaming, but this new build definitely has got me into it again.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Thanks, I read that earlier in the day. Laptop is now being used in place of the old desktop so I will probably wait another month until the new chipsets are available.

Definitely going Sandy Bridge though.
 

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This chipset problem is very unusual: while logic errors are common and can usually be fixed through firmware updates, this is a problem with the physical process they used to build the chipset.

Anandtech has some additional background on the problem: see http://www.anandtech.com/show/4142/intel-discovers-bug-in-6series-chipset-begins-recall

Two key points:

  • Intel expects that over three years approximately 5-15% of the mobos will experience the problem
  • The SATA 6Gbps ports are not affected
I'm not sure about other mobo manufacturers, but at for at least some of the ASUS P8P67 lineup they also include a Marvell SATA controller that would presumably be unaffected by the problem.

It will be interesting to see how the recall is managed. While Intel does sell their own mobo lineup, I would imagine that most sold to date are from ASUS, Gigabyte, etc--and they're the ones that would in theory do the recall.

While the recall will cost Intel some serious $, I imagine an equivalent issue is that they will have to stop chipset shipments until the problem is solved. That means in theory it will be impossible to build a Sandy Bridge system for another month or so.

In the short term I think I'll just switch to the 6Gpbs ports for my SSD and hard drive, and I may move the Blu-ray burner to one of the Marvell SATA ports.
 

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And to think I just got my Asus P8P67 Deluxe and 2600K up and running.

Question, the SATA6 connections, Intel or Marvell are designed primarily for data drives so what is the impact of using them for an optical drive - Blu-ray or DVD?
 

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Question, the SATA6 connections, Intel or Marvell are designed primarily for data drives so what is the impact of using them for an optical drive - Blu-ray or DVD?
That's fine. The SATA controller doesn't care if its connected to a SSD, optical drive, or spinning rust.
 

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I just swapped my HDD and optical drive from the 3G SATA connectors to 6G connectors. However I have read that we can probably leave any optical device on the 3G connectors for now.

But now I am trying to decide if I really want to dismantle my system and RMA the motherboard, or just keep it and continue using the 6G SATA ports. :confused:

I doubt I will ever need more than just the two SATA ports and I still have the two Marvel 6G SATA connectors on my ASUS P8P67 Pro.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Anandtech article was interesting. Makes me think that I should just wait for the Z68 Chipset
 

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So I have a couple options, leave my optical drive on the 3G port until it fails and then move it over to one of the Marvell 6G ports. Only issue there is the reported slow transfer times however I don't use the optical disk all that much... or just RMA the board down the road at a convenient time.

Hugh, you mention waiting for the Z68 Chipset. Will that only be available with the 2011 pinout? Those CPUs are likely going to be quite a bit more expensive although the performance gains will likely make it worthwhile if you haven't started down the upgrade path in a couple years.
 
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