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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for an affordable solution to getting internet to my Receiver.

I have Wifi in the home, but the Receiver needs an Ethernet cable.

What options do I have?

There are those house wired solutions... but i don't know enough about them.
I think there are dongles for xbox? but they are or were $100

thoughts? ideas?

I would like to use iphone as a remote, and stream music... are my main reasons for wanting this.
 

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You can get portable access points from companies like Asus or D-link that will allow you to connect Ethernet devices to WiFi. You can get them for about $50 or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Can you point me to a product like this? They are called "Portable access points"

It can capture WiFi, and then use an Ethernet...

I'd pay that if I had to.
 

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Here is one from Netgear but also made by other companies like D-Link.

Sometimes called (and sold cheaper) as Wireless Print Server. You can also look at getting Powerline Adaptors
 

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Watch the "wireless print servers" - most of those have only a USB port for plugging a printer into, and some of them that do have ethernet will ONLY work with a printer (stupid, but true).

I have two megapixel IP cameras on the front of my house, plugged into an old Linksys WRT54G router that I've flashed with DD-WRT, using that for a wireless link back to my main router. You can find these routers for super-cheap used and flash them and give yourself up to five wired "remote" ports.
 

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Can you point me to a product like this?
Off the top of my head, there's the Asus WL-330gE and the D-Link DAP-1350. Both are available from Canada Computers and elsewhere. They can also be USB powered, so you don't have to plug in another power supply, if you have a USB port available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks James, Those look they'll do the trick!

strange. I was in at Canada Computers this weekend to find something like this... the person there couldn't find anything like it.

So Just to be Sure.

If I take an Ethernet cable and plug it into the AV receiver, and this... The receiver should be able to connect to the internet?
 

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I have a trendnet TEW-654TR
Works as a small travel router (wired -> wireless)
But also works in the opposite mode (wireless receive -> wired output)

Similar to the D-Link mentioned.
Though I got mine for $25 or so on sale, good value.
 

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If I take an Ethernet cable and plug it into the AV receiver, and this... The receiver should be able to connect to the internet?
That's correct. Here's a link to some info about the Asus WL-330gE. The mode you need is "Ethernet Adapter Mode", which gets mentioned in the diagram in that link. In that mode, it will connect an Ethernet device to your WiFi network. One other thing, the D-Link DAP-1350 can do 802.11n, whereas the Asus is only b/g.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone.

d-link one is nice looking, but at $99 just not worth it.
Thanks recneps, that was a good deal... i can only find it for $60+

Asus got back to me with a few options.

The WL-330gE and WL-330N3G and The RT-N12, RT-N13u

Seems like the best option here would be the RT-N12

it has more then one port
repeats the signal
is an N
for $50​

So this works... Now, is this going to be a question you get what you pay for? would anyone recommend against this?

otherwise i think im good to get this. Thanks again everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK so i WAS going to get the RT-N12 router...

But if I understand this correctly, the WL-330gE can be had for $45 at newegg
(a link through flyerland took an extra few dollars of the original price)
but then I noticed a mail in rebate worth $20

So a choice between
$40 (at new egg) for RT-N12
or
$25 (after rebates) of the WL-330gE
 

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d-link one is nice looking, but at $99 just not worth it.
Thanks recneps, that was a good deal... i can only find it for $60+
It's currently at the price I mentioned at Canada Computers. Go to their site and search on DAP-1350 for current price. They also recently had the Asus with a $20 rebate off the current price, so it would have been about $25.
 

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I normally have my laptop connected to my Trendnet router via wireless 'G' and 13.5 Mbps download speed is the norm. I also have a DAP-1350 but it's not used in this set up.

Just for fun I set my DAP-1350 to Client Mode, disabled the wireless adapter on my laptop, then connect it to the DAP-1350 via a LAN cable. In this configuration the DAP-1350 is connected to the Trendnet router via wireless 'N' and I would have thought that this will give me a faster connection. No dice. The download speed actually dropped to about 5 Mbps, a very significant drop.

Any thoughts? Weaker radio on the DAP-1350? It is so small..
 

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What is actually needed, to answer the OP, is a wireless bridge. Many routers can act as such a bridge, especially with third party firmware like DD-WRT, and my experience is that these routers are cheaper than stand-alone bridges.

Note that there are other ways to solve this problem. Thes best way is by running ethernet cable - but the OP likely cannot do that in this instance. Other options are powerline networking or MOCA networking. I use two Motorola NIM-100 adapters to send my network over my cable wiring - this gives me better speed than I was able to achieve using powerline adapters.

If you are just using this for audio then you don't have to worry about the speed too much. But if you want to stream HD video than you may have an issue with wireless, especially if it is not 802.11n. That is where you may need something like powerline or MOCA networking.
 

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^^^^
Be careful. Most devices will not connect via WiFi that way, because they don't know how to talk to a wireless device. The two portable access points I mentioned have that function included, as do some others.
 

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The current model Apple Airport Express can be configured to provide a "wireless to wired" bridge function that will work on any WiFi network (not just Apple's).

As an added bonus you can connect the audio output of the same Airport Express to one of your receiver's audio inputs, thus adding Airplay functionality to your receiver.
 

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putting two router on the same network is not such a good idea for a novice. you have to disable DHCP on one or you will have 2 DHCP servers on the network and that is a no no. the simplest way to connect to a network if pulling wires is not possible is to use an ac power bridge. you buy the ac wiresless bridge such as the one produced by Belkin in pairs. pug one into the wall ac socket near your router, connect a cat 5 patch cord to an empty port on your router or switch. pug the other one into another ac sockey near your other network device and you have for all intense purposes just created an active network data port just as if you pulled a direct wire link to your router directly. the data packet is transmitted via the ac power lne at high frequency between the devices. the nice thing is you can add more location by installing more transcevers on the ac network. the ac sockets must not have filters on them. the network is limited on your immediate ac power loop and a password can also be used to block out intruders.
 

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^^^^
There is no problem with having more than one DHCP server on a network, provided there is some means to prevent them from trying to hand out the same address. Some DHCP servers will ping an address, before issuing it. An easy way is to just configure the DHCP servers to use different portions the address block e.g. server 1 - 192.168.1.100-149 and server 2 192.168.150-199. This way there'll never be a conflict. The other info, such as default route, DNS etc. would normally be the same.
 

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I actually have four routers operating in my house - one as a true router and three as WAPs/switches (I have a very large house with basement + 2 floors). All you have to do is to turn off DHCP and assign a static IP like 192.168.1.2 (assuming that your router is 192.168.1.1) to your non-routing routers. That is pretty simple to do. Many of the newer routers can also act as bridges.
 
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