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The new Windows 11 hardware requirements couldn't come at a worse time. Supply chain issues are causing increased prices and shortages of parts for PC builders. Things like popular CPUs are sometimes difficult to find and more expensive. I recently ordered a new PC case. The one I want is either unavailable, way overpriced from a US vendor or back ordered. I originally found one for a reasonable price but the order status went from "Preparing for shipment" to "We will email you when we have an estimated delivery date" after about a week. Between researching the build and placing the order, another part became unavailable from the preferred vendor and was $25 to $100 more everywhere else.
 

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Is Microsoft going to force Windows 10 users to migrate to 11?
 

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The Windows 11 upgrade will be rolled out automatically to compatible hardware unless it is actively prevented. A quick search turns up several techniques to prevent or delay automatic Windows updates. That's probably not the best option.

If the PC does not meet certain requirements, then it will not be updated. One requirement is a compatible CPU and GPU. For mainstream PC processors that means an AMD 3000 or Intel 8000 series or later, or another processor with Win11 support and DirectX 12 support. The main obstacle to installing Windows 11 on many PCs is a disabled or missing Trusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0. That is usually implemented in the CPU and supported by the motherboard BIOS. CPUs and motherboards made in the past several years will have TPM support but it may not be enabled. Leaving it disabled will prevent the installation of Windows 11. Note that upgrading the BIOS may enable TPM automatically. If TPM is enabled, turning it off in the BIOS should prevent a Win11 upgrade.

Even worse is that Windows 10 will not be supported after October 14th, 2025 which will leave systems without TPM and other Win11 requirements without a supported Windows operating system. They will still run Windows 10 but may become subjected to security vulnerabilities. They will also run supported versions of Linux.


 

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.....Even worse is that Windows 10 will not be supported after October 14th, 2025 .....
So far I haven't switched and haven't yet found any new feature or piece of software requiring WIN 11 that I either would need or want. 2025. That's quite a while yet and lots of newer CPUs/other hardware from companies like Intel and AMD before we have to face the end of WIN 10. Who knows what will be the "hot ticket" item by then? Perhaps even a brand new OS from a young new computer genius that has wiped both MS and the Fruit out of the business? I can wait.
 

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You mean Linux and Linus Torvalds? It already happened. Smartphones became the next hot item years ago. There are over 7 billion smartphones in the world, about half of which run Android which is based on Linux. There are just over 2 billion PCs in use today. In addition, most other devices with embedded operating systems, everything from thermostats, security cameras, internet routers and smart A/V equipment to the huge internet server farms run by Amazon and Google are based on Linux. iPhones are based on BSD which is a close cousin of Linux. Both are rewrites of Unix, which preceded almost every other operating system in use today. Even Windows 10 and 11 contain a Linux subsystem and Windows 11 will soon have an Android subsystem.

The only question is, will PC hardware and Windows evolve enough to still be in demand ten years from now? MS could easily become the next IBM, a company that has lost most of its core business and is focused mainly on retaining business customers. The main reason PCs are hanging on is due to business, school and gaming PC use. Current supply chain issues combined with demand for work and schooling from home have depleted stocks of affordable PC hardware that runs Windows. Windows 11 could become the next Windows Vista, an operating system that nobody wants, hardware requirements that are too expensive and billions of PCs in existence that cannot run it. The difference this time around is that there are other companies who are big enough and capable of providing viable alternatives.
 

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Is it perfect, No. Is Win 10 perfect, No. But the Win 11 features make it a clear choice for me, but everybody needs to make their own choice.

Win 11 has been installed on my daily use laptop since the Insider Preview was released last year. There were initially some minor cosmetic issues that were resolved over time. Switched to the regular production version when it was released and that was even better. Recently upgraded to the Beta Insider Preview which is the early version of the 22H2 that will be released later this year. It has been the most stable version of Windows that I have ever had as measured by the Computer Reliability and Problem History graph.
 

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I lost interest in windows with the windows 2000 release.

Windows xp was the last good release.

Have been happily running Linux for the last 20 years.

I run Amiga workbench 3.1 on top of linux , and it runs like a dream.

A Amiga os that Commodore made back in 1992 , has fewer bugs , better apps and better os performance than any microsoft Windows made in the last 20 years.

Have been running Amiga os since 1987 , no plans to stop running it.
 

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Whatever happened to Windows 10 being the last version of Windows ever?
I'm surprised more hasn't been made of this. In non tech circles that is.
There are many opinions about this. This PC Mag article explains it quite well. Anyone who really believed that it was the last does not understand tech.
I think most computer users "don't understand tech" but why should that excuse being misled?
 

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Yes, that is not an excuse. Windows 10 could be Windows 10 forever as was stated. Anything else is just marketing BS, not tech at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
In the forums there are some people complaining that they cannot install it on older equipment, others that have the right PC but complaining that they don't want it, others saying it is faster, others like the UI (me included), and others that have it but going to great lengths to make it look like Win 10.

In summary, the world is made up of leaders, followers, lemmings, deniers, some resistant to change, and those that just like shiny new things.;)
I am using it but I do not see anything in it that qualified users as leaders. What a joke!! ;)
 

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Yes, that is not an excuse. Windows 10 could be Windows 10 forever as was stated. Anything else is just marketing BS, not tech at all.
Maybe read the article?

But Microsoft representatives never said that Windows 10 would be the last version of Windows—not really. That comment was actually made by Jerry Nixon, a Microsoft developer evangelist who spoke at the company’s ”Tiles, Notifications, and Action Center” presentation about Windows 10 at Microsoft’s Microsoft Ignite conference in 2015. According to the transcript of the session, Nixon’s comment was more of a throwaway line, one that he literally referred to as a segue. Microsoft developers could never talk about what they were currently working on, he said, only what they had worked on and released. That changed with Windows 10, because it was all one platform.

“All the stuff that’s coming, because even though we were announcing Windows 8.1, we were all really working on Windows 10,” Nixon said at the time. “It’s sort of a bummer in its own way. But that’s not what’s happening today.

“Right now we’re releasing Windows 10, and because Windows 10 is the last version of Windows, we’re all still working on Windows 10,” Nixon continued. “And it’s really brilliant. So I can say things like, yeah, we’re working on interactive tiles and it’s coming to Windows 10 in one of its future updates, right.”

Microsoft didn’t deny what Nixon said, but it also didn’t back up the “last version” of Windows, either.

“Recent comments at Ignite about Windows 10 are reflective of the way Windows will be delivered as a service bringing new innovations and updates in an ongoing manner, with continuous value for our consumer and business customers,” says a Microsoft spokesperson in a statement to The Verge at the time. “We aren’t speaking to future branding at this time, but customers can be confident Windows 10 will remain up-to-date and power a variety of devices from PCs to phones to Surface Hub to HoloLens and Xbox.”
People were "misled" because they didn't pay attention to what was said and by who. Of course, lazy tech reporting chasing clicks happily took the dev quote out of context.
 
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