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I installed the Dev channel on my daily driver laptop when it was released, but have switched just to the Beta channel so that I can move to the production release (without having to do a clean install). There were a few minor problems but it is running smoothly now. Some UI polishing is still needed.
It is uncertain if a PC that does not meet the recommended standard will be allowed to have the production release installed even it if runs the Insider Preview. Be prepared to clean install Win 10.
 

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The general consensus is that Win 11 is faster than Win 10, but the differences are not going to change your life in any meaningful way.
My observances are that boot time is faster, and cumulative updates are way faster.
 

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So what are the differences between Windows 10 & 11? Is worth upgrading?
If you like to experiment, see whats new, help to find bugs, influence the direction the o/s is going, or to be sure you PC can run it, then it is worth the upgrade.
But it is not a one-way street. Take a backup before jumping, and if something goes wrong or you do not like what you see then just do a restore. My data is not extensive and I have separate backups of it anyway. A partition backup of my C: drive (o/s and data) took 30 minutes, and a restore took 10 minutes, so easily managed.
My PC is about to restart with the latest upgrade to Beta 22000.132.
 

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@MCIBUS You get monthly cumulative updates that are appropriate to your PC. When Windows 11 is officially released you will get an update IF it is appropriate as Microsoft knows the exact configuration of your PC. I would not worry about issue with drivers or third party programs as the architectural change from Win 10 to Win 11 (except for TPM) is not radical.
No need for you to venture into the pre release world at this point.
ps. The premium being paid for support services might be better spent on an alternative platform. Open a different topic if you would like to explore this.
 

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Windows 11 is a slippery slope. Whatever happened to Windows 10 being the last version of Windows ever? Games can be played with a Google Chromecast, Xbox, Wii and other small form factor devices. Most things that people use a PC for can also be done on a pocket PC, AKA smartphone. Some of today's smartphones are more powerful than most 10 year old PCs. So who needs a new Windows 11 PC when all most people need is a smartphone?
Not sure what is slippery about it, it is just an evolution of the OS and a stake in the ground on the requirements for the future.
That statement about being the last version did not come from MS, and it is unfortunate that they did not officially deny it.
I suspect that the business world has the largest share of PC sales and that is not moving to smartphones. This is appears to be base design point for Windows.
There are things that I do with my smartphone that I cannot do with my PC, and vice versa. A tablet does not fit my needs. Different tools for different people.
 

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There are many opinions about this. This PC Mag article explains it quite well. Anyone who really believed that it was the last does not understand tech.
The slippery slope I am referring to is that Microsoft is making a huge number of PCs obsolete in 2025. The main beneficiaries of the move will potentially be Intel, AMD and PC makers. It will create huge numbers of unsupported, insecure PCs, similar to the situation when XP support was discontinued. That was only after extending the XP support cutoff date for an unprecedented length of time. This could be a major public relations debacle for Microsoft, which could lose a significant portion of its business. Microsoft and Intel could quickly become the next IBMs or DECs as consumers and businesses look for alternatives.
I disagree. Technology advancement and the rise of security exposures are making a huge number of PC obsolete. Yes, there are many businesses still running XP and 8.1, and there will also be many that do not upgrade to Win 11 in the near future or choose to have their new PC's installed with an old Win OS. There is a significant effort to verify that a new OS still works well all on their processes and systems. MS will continue to support Win 10 after 2025 for a fee, just as it does for older OS's.

The beneficiaries of keeping old technology in use for critical functions are the "threat actors" as these systems will be easier to infiltrate and take over compared to enhanced security measures deployed in newer technology.
 

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I have not followed the timeline of OS X to know if there were new features introduced that could be applied to some machines but not others.
This is the situation faced by MS for the Windows product. There are functional enhancements being introduced that will only run on some PC's. Retaining the product name of Win 10 but having some PC running the enhanced features and other not would be a nightmare. They have put a stake in the ground on which ones qualify. Yes, they have allowed some exceptions but have cleared stated that installing Win 11 on unsupported PC's is the users choice and that there could be issues down the road.
Watch this video if you are curious about the security enhancement that they are willing to publicly talk about.
 

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A rather cynical outlook. There are ways to get Win 11 installed and running on older hardware (the oldest I have seen is a 10 year old PC), but there is no guarantee of it future for updates.

There are some who are quite prepared to drive 20 year old cars, or run old versions of Windows. That is their choice, but technology and innovation cannot be stopped. In 50 years Windows and PC's will have changed, if they even exist in forms that we would recognize. Should this journey be delayed for a year, two years, five years?

If you would like to read about the progress being made see this article from ARC Technica. It is an in-depth review but the first few pages should be sufficient.
 

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In the forums there are some people complaining that they cannot install it on older equipment, others that have the right PC but complaining that they don't want it, others saying it is faster, others like the UI (me included), and others that have it but going to great lengths to make it look like Win 10.

In summary, the world is made up of leaders, followers, lemmings, deniers, some resistant to change, and those that just like shiny new things.;)
 

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Is it perfect, No. Is Win 10 perfect, No. But the Win 11 features make it a clear choice for me, but everybody needs to make their own choice.

Win 11 has been installed on my daily use laptop since the Insider Preview was released last year. There were initially some minor cosmetic issues that were resolved over time. Switched to the regular production version when it was released and that was even better. Recently upgraded to the Beta Insider Preview which is the early version of the 22H2 that will be released later this year. It has been the most stable version of Windows that I have ever had as measured by the Computer Reliability and Problem History graph.
 
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