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When I had BELL satellite, my 9242 receiver also had OTA inputs for ATSC integration. It wasn't long after getting the 9242 that they stopped selling that receiver and the new one had no OTA inputs.

elyk
 

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All I see is a large blank square.:confused:
 

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Bell has it on the 9242. Too bad they eliminated it when they "updated" to the 9400.
I will keep my 9242 for as long as possible. OTA is one of the more important features of that unit to me, especially in Canada where we have simsub and can't watch the actual US broadcast.
I suppose if you don't live near the US boarder where you can receive US OTA then it doesn't really matter.
 

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I too can not see your upload its a blank image . I myself am an owner of a Bell 9242 receiver and yes it has Antenna inputs for over the air ANTENNA reception. But I live sorta out of scope cuz my tv or 9242 can't pickup any ANTENNA channels oh well. Maybe I need a bigger ANTENNA I will try again later.
 

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I suppose if you don't live near the US boarder where you can receive US OTA then it doesn't really matter.
It actually does matter...as I live in Winnipeg which is fairly close to the US border, however all I receive is the 4 major Canadian OTA channels but with the 9242 I can record them and 2 satellite channels at the same time...or record 2 and watch one.
 

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The only reason the 9442 had OTA was because it's a clone of a Dish receiver and Dish actively promoted and supported OTA. Dish provided an OTA guide and full integration with satellite signals, Bell never did. Part of that was due to Dish not having enough bandwidth for all the available US OTA signals that were available so it had to come up with another way to provide local signals. Fast forward a few years and Dish obtained enough bandwidth for adding local OTA on satellite (some of which they obtained from Bell) and were charging $10/mo for local signals. OTA tuners disappeared from subsequent receivers partly due to Dish no longer requiring them and partly due to Bell obtaining custom made receivers for Canada.

The lack of OTA tuner support by Bell (and Shaw) was also due to their business model. Their basic package was mostly OTA signals. They made most of their profit from selling OTA signals they provided on satellite. In most places where satellite dishes were used, there was very little OTA available anyway and no ATSC. Specialty channels were an add-on. The US satellite model was the exact opposite. Their basic packages consisted of all specialty cable channels with no OTA channels. They didn't even start adding OTA channels until ATSC became commonplace in most major US cities, up to a decade ahead of Canada.
 

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So to summarize this thread you can still achieve this on bell sateite but not by ordering new equiptment. You must find a second hand 9242 (pvr) or 6141 (non pvr) if you wish to have a receiver that is capable of receiving digital atsc antenna channels.
 

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These Bell OTA Tuners are not as good as OTA Tuners on most T.V'S nowadays.I notice that they have a hard time with channels using the same channel but different frequencies,example 35.0,35.1,35.2.They also have no guide.
You can also use the older 9200 and 6100 for OTA only.
 

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It's probably better to get an OTA tuner such as the HDHomeRun and use their DVR package, NextPVR with a Schedules Direct subscription or the Plex Pass DVR. The first two require a Windows PC for recording. Plex supports some other platforms. If all that is required is live TV, the HDHomeRun will work with most media players including smart TVs and phones.
 

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Not all TVs have tuners. Mine doesn't. It's an unused, extra cost item for most Canadians. I'd rather see the money put into a better panel or an extra HDMI port. I've yet to see a TV that incorporates a DVR as well.
 

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It is extra cost for Bell and it’s customers and mostly unused by Bell customers as well.
If someone wants to have OTA tuner there are many ways of getting it.
 

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Good luck getting support or help for tuning antenna on your satellite receiver. The call centre offers very little help for solving problems for antenna issues and since most of their boxes don't support antenna its likely not worth it for them to continue supporting it down the road.
 

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Here is the direct link for those that can't see the embedded video (me included)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcDdgoqRncA

The reason that Dish is promoting "free" OTA TV is that the U.S. broadcast regulations are considerably different than Canada. In the U.S., cable/sat. companies are required to pay each local station for carrying their signal, at a price they negotiate. TV Providers are only allowed to show local signals - they are not allowed to show distant signals, so there is no such thing as time-shifting. Finally, carrying a local signal is optional and so is subscribing to them.

For example, Dish has a Flex Pack with a pre-set list of specialty channels for $35/month. You can add the locals for your area for $12/month and you can also add additional themes of specialty channels. If you use an OTA antenna, you can receive the signals for free, you don't have to pay Dish for the locals and Dish doesn't have to pay the OTA station. Dish makes it easy for their customers to do that by selling a dongle that plugs into the newer sat boxes, which integrates the guide and allows recording. Some of Dish's other packages automatically include the locals, so there is little advantage to using an antenna.

In Canada, the Copyright Act states that cable/sat providers can transmit all local OTA stations for free (both Canadian and American.) They pay a small copyright fee for distant stations which they can transmit as time-shifted stations. The CRTC generally limits the American networks to one local and one distant, but there is no limit on Canadian networks. In 2010, the CRTC proposed a fee-for-carriage (FFC) or value-for-signal (VFS) similar to the American one, but the Supreme Court ruled that they did not have the jurisdiction to overrule the Copyright Act.

Canadian cable/sat providers are also required to carry local Canadian stations in all their packages including "skinny basic." They aren't required to carry U.S. locals, but they generally do, so there is little advantage to having an auxiliary OTA antenna compared to the U.S. situation.
 

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Very true. Dr.Dave is right I received all the channels I would normally on Antenna on my satellite package when I was a customer. anyways there is no advantage to getting a lot of antenna stations when you have satellite. Now if your a chord cutter it's a different story.
 

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bev fan said:
Why would Bell bother with the OTA tuner when every new tv has got one.
Because you can't immediately record programs if you use the OTA tuner in the TV - you have to add another device. It's nice to have the OTA input on the receiver so recording integrates with the other BELL channels.

elyk
 

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Well, it may be nice but if Bell had followed Dish Network technology then we would have had whole home PVR or something like Sling tv and that would have been really nice. Unfortunately Bell is losing satellite customers so most likely Bell has no interest investing in new innovations like they do with Bell Fibe Tv.
 
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