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It sounds like Canada needs an 'Internet Measurements Act' before Measurement Canada gets involved. I'm not holding my breath.
 

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A member of another internet related message board wrote them recently and in a nut shell their reply was they have no desire get involved in internet usage metering.
but the letter doesn't say that. it seems to suggest that the reason they don't get involved is there is no legislation regarding internet measurement like the Weights and Measures Act and Regulations, and the Electricity and Gas Inspection Act and Regulations.

In other words, measurement Canada needs the politicians to pass laws so it can enforce them.
 

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The guy replied to Measurement Canada's reply implying that it was measurement canada's job to step in once inaccurate measurement was found regardless if it is written into the act or not.

I don't believe he received a reply.

Thank you for taking the time to reply. I appreciated your prompt response and attention.

However, I still have a few questions, and matters of concern here, which are shared by many people now faced with major incumbents (ILECs) gravitating toward these kinds of usage-based billing schemes. And there is a growing chorus of concerns that these billing schemes and metering are rife with overbilling, counting issues, verifiability, and outright abuse.

To my understanding, is not the onus upon measurement canada, once discovering evidence of inaccurate metering which results in inflated bills, REGARDLESS of the good/service involved, to actually get involved and discover why these inaccuracies exist? The Act may be silent upon throughput measuring devices, but it is not silent upon the principle of fairness of measurement where the unfairness would result in extraordinary additional costs for consumers whose habits have not changed, and where such additional costs are largely based on erroneous and unfair metering.

To clarify, a weight or a measure is a weight or a measure, irrespective of the good or service being provided. When I go to a grocery store, for example, and purchase a quantity of food at the deli, I can always be reasonably assured that the amount of food that I receive is accurately measured and can be independently verified. Why cannot I have that same assurance when I purchase Internet services that the when the provider chooses to bill me via usage that it is in an accurate, verifiable quantity? Why is this different than any other good or service that MC regulates?

Before answering that please remember that the landscape is shifting very quickly in the Internet Service Provider field and many providers did not choose to bill via quantity (UBB) in any material significance until only recently. Does it not behoove measurement canada to re-examine this issue so that fairness to the customer is placed at the forefront?

In light of the facts and evidence, why would MC NOT choose to do so? Why would MC not take this initiative even despite the fact that "other industrialized nations" do not? Do we not want canada to be a leader in technological innovation? Then it would make sense that measurement canada keep ahead of the issues in regards to fair billing and regulation and ensuring a level playing field with regards to these "new" types of measuring devices.

Why would measurement canada not work in partnership with the CRTC to ensure that canada becomes a true and shining example of fair regulation and innovation to the rest of the world?

I and the many people who have read your first response would appreciate your department's reply and rationale and perhaps I'll take this opportunity to suggest that this would be forwarded to those who may take appropriate action on these concerns. Thank you sincerely.
And another article written about the inaccuracy of ISP's usage "meters".
http://www.moneyville.ca/article/937763--roseman-let-s-talk-about-faulty-internet-meters
 

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It appears at odds for one government agency (the CRTC) to approve or mandate measured billing for a public service while another (Measurement Canada) would not take take steps to ensure that the measurements and billing was accurate. Do they expect consumers to verify the measurement and billing on their own? I know some here are capable but the average consumer is not. Even if some people do find inaccuracies, they are like a voice in the wilderness until their results are verified by a recognized agency or a large number of individuals.
 

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As far as I know, there are 8 bits in a byte and 1024 bytes in 1KB.

Where it seems to get murkier is with Mega and Giga. Some seem to indicate a Megabyte is 1024 * 1000 but I always use 1024 * 1024. Same thing for Gigabyte (add a * 1024 to the calc).

There is no cast in concrete rule as far as I can tell. :)
 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte

The kilobyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. The prefix kilo means 1000 in the International System of Units (SI), therefore 1 kilobyte is 1000bytes. The recommended unit symbol for the kilobyte is kB or kbyte.

The kilobyte is often considered to be 1024 bytes in some fields of computer science and information technology. This use has been discouraged by the major standards organizations and a new prefix system was defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission, which defines the kibibyte for this binary multiple and affirms the kilobyte as 1000bytes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megabyte

The megabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information storage or transmission with two different values depending on context: 1048576 bytes generally for computer memory; and one million bytes (106, see prefix mega-) generally for computer storage. The IEEE Standards Board has decided that "Mega will mean 1 000 000", with exceptions allowed for the base-two meaning. In rare cases, it is used to mean 1000×1024 (1024000) bytes.
Gigabyte similarily has multiple meanings. It's a bit of a mess.
 

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Just one of the problems with Usage Based Billing (caps). There isn't even a standard unit of measurement let alone a proper way to actually meter it.

I am not nearly as versed as some people on that forum as far as the way everything works, but one thing that was brought up that would affect your usage is DPI (Deep Packet Inspection, aka throttling).

When you are being throttled some packets are being discarded and you never receive them. There is some question regarding those packets and if they are being counted as your usage or not. If they are being counted, you are being "charged" for packets (bytes), you never received due to the DPI. Depending on how much you use a program that the DPI is throttling, that could add up to quite a bit of data that never actually made it to your computer yet it is counted in your usage.

And for an update, the guy that wrote Measurement Canada never received a reply to the letter he wrote in post #44
 

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It could add up to 90% or more of the packets sent or received in some cases. IMHO, only packets that are successfully sent or received should be counted. If network errors force retransmission, the retransmission communication should not be counted. It's kind of like paying extra postage for multiple letters that are not delivered. If the service is not rendered, it should not be billable.
 

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From Rogers FAQ

How can I calculate my additional usage and charges?
The usage tool tracks your usage in megabytes. To convert your usage into gigabytes and calculate your additional charges, follow these steps:
1. Over usage = (“Total Usage” MINUS “Service Includes”) DIVIDED BY 1,024
2. Round down to the nearest gigabyte
3. Over-usage charge = Over usage in GB (from Step #1) MULTIPLIED BY $1.25
For example:
Total Usage: 128,522 MB
Service Includes: 90,000 MB
Therefore:
1. Over usage in GB = (128,522 – 90,000) / 1,024 = 37.62 GB
2. Round down to the nearest gigabyte = 37 GB
3. Over-usage charge = 37 X $1.25 = $46.25
Rogers is saying they track in Megabytes and then divide by 1,024 to get Gigabytes.

so for Rogers

1 GB = 1,024 MB. No idea on how they calculate a MB or KB. (i.e./ 1,024 or 1,000)
 

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To further the conversation....

said by user

If one definition of a Kilobyte is 1024 bits of data and another definition is 1000 bits of data than it should be clearly defined as to which is to be used as the Standard Unit of Measure. As 1 GB of data @ $2.50 per GB is less costly with a 1024bit kilobyte than that of a 1000bit kilobyte.

There is nothing to be defined there, SI clearly and unambiguously defines scaling prefixes like Kilo as 1000 units of something, Mega as 1 000 000 units, Giga as 1 000 000 000 of whatever unit, etc. This is the only definition that has indisputable legal significance.

The power-of-1024 prefixes are not recognized by the SI since the SI is only concerned with physical measurements, nor arbitrary/convenient computer science definitions so the 1024 bytes KB is invalid. To help resolve the ambiguity from this prefix misuse, the IEC recommended the use of Ki/Mi/Gi/Ti/etc. prefixes for base-1024 prefixes.
 

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DjEclipse,

So if understand correctly, you're saying that a

KiB = 1,024 bytes
MiB = 1,024 x 1,024
GiB = 1,024 x 1,024 x 1,024 = 1,073,511,741,824 bytes

and

KB = 1,000 bytes
MB = 1,000 x 1,000
GB = 1,000 x 1,000 x 1,000 = 1,000,000,000

making a GiB about 7.35% bigger than a GB.


Edit: So in reading Wikipedia, we should refer to a GiB as a Gibibyte and GB as a Gigabyte. Is that correct?
 

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To make things even worse, some companies (like hard drive makers) mix the two types of measurements. (IIRC, their MB is 1000*1024 and GB is 1000*1000*1024.) I wonder what Bell is using, or are they even telling anyone? I did a quick search and didn't find anything. What does Measurements Canada have to say on the issue?
 

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hugh,

I am just sharing info about inaccurate measurement. I am quoting what I have read on another board over on this board as I greatly feel everyone should be aware of the inaccuracies in data measurement.

The more people that know how wrong it really is to try and charge people for specific data usage (caps and UBB), without a standard form of measurement, or an accurate way to measure, the greater chance we as a country will have at making changes and putting a stop to the big ISP's raping us.

Regarding what is the proper measurement I am just as lost as you. We do need a standard, and we do need someone keeping the ISP's in check to make sure if they are going to charge their customers by data usage, there needs to be a standard form of measurement.

I have quoted different people from another forum (whos members live and breathe this stuff) to show that as of today there is no standards at all. Which brings us back to the original question, how can you charge me for data usage when there is no accurate meter, or even a standard unit of measure?

Bell never counted on a large portion of their consumers to become educated on this topic.
 

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The more I read, the more I think what I posted in post #54 is accurate.
 

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ScaryBob,

Read this thread, I posted a rely form Measurement Canada, as of today they have no intention of getting involved.

Read post #39
 

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DjEclipse, that was more of a rhetorical question, since I suspect MC will take no position until directed to do so by parliament.

Hugh, I believe post #53 is accurate. As it stands, ISPs are free to use whatever measurement they choose and are accountable to no-one.
 

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Hugh,

That's the thing, there is no correct answer.

Right now one ISP could use 1GB as 1,073,741,824

And another 1GB = 1,000,000,000

But with ISP A you are being charged more than ISP B for using the same amount of data.

In fact, right now an ISP can use their own unit of measurement and no one is to stop them since no standard is in place..
 
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