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Hey there,
We are planning to move to Ontario next week. As we all know, Internet is one of the most powerful tools in our daily life. We start our day by checking emails and notifications from social media. Earlier we used to go to libraries in search of information but today we just browse and obtain information within seconds. High-speed internet is essential for our new home. What are the essential things to ask the internet service provider before hiring?
Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
 

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You might ask if they provide IPv6. The world is moving to it to get away from the problems caused by the IPv4 address shortage. Some companies, such as Rogers, Cogeco, Teksavvy and others provide it. Bell doesn't. You'll also want to consider the technology used for the connection. Fibre is the best and cable is also good. ADSL varies considerably and wireless can be expensive. Both cable and ADSL now use "fibre to the curb", where fibre comes to your neighbourhood, but then copper from there.
 

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Not sure IPv4 vs. IPv6 is that important for consumer end users. If getting a static IP address or addresses is important to you for some reason, then you should ask ISPs what their policies are. Also, if you can, ask your future neighbours who they use and how they find the service. That's good way of uncovering if a particular ISP has problems in a particular area.
 

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If getting a static IP address or addresses is important to you for some reason, then you should ask ISPs what their policies are.
With IPv6, you get a minimum of 18.4 billion, billion addresses and they're almost static. I get 256x that.
 

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Almost static is not the same as static. I've had the same IP address for about three years now, but it has changed in the past, and the ISP is under no obligation to tell me if/when it's going to change in the future.
 

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^^^^
The same with IPv6. My IPv4 address has been the same for several years and requires a hardware change (different MAC addresses) or Rogers reconfiguring the network to cause an address change. With IPv6, it would be similar, but the prefix is based on the DUID, which is a file stored in the device. Also, since the prefix is routed to the user, network changes shouldn't cause it to change.
 

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What are the essential things to ask the internet service provider before hiring?
Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
Type of connection, speed, price, hardware are usually available on the provider's web site. More important is what residents in the area can say. How reliable is it? Do they get the promised speed or something lower? How good is customer support and how long do they take to fix issues? Another thing to check is contractual obligations. If the service turns out to be crap, you don't want to be stuck paying hundreds of dollars to cancel in order to get better service.
 

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If you have your address, search who has hi-speed. My 'hood in Whitby can only get hi-speed from Rogers, Bell doesn't have the infrastructure. Also, if you are a business, sometimes you can get better rates. I did when I switched from consumer to Biz for the home office.
 

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^^^^
Also, check for bundles. With Rogers, you can bundle Internet, TV, home phone and home monitoring.
 

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In Guelph and likely elsewhere on Rogers Cable they over-provision. My internet is their 150 Mbps service but download is normally around 275-290 Mbps.

If you are moving to a new subdivision there is a good chance that you might get fibre to the premises.

As for IPV6, most of the ‘big’ sites are available on V6 now.


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