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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Since I got such great advice when I needed to buy the camera (Nikon D90) I figured I'd ask about a UV filter.

My wife loves her camera and has signed up for a course. The teacher highly recommended she get a UV filter (for function and lens protection) but she didn't recommend anything specific.

Based on the limited research I've done, it looks like she needs a 67mm filter but does the rest matter?

I don't mind ordering something but I'd prefer if it was something we could pick-up in / around Ottawa so she can have it by her next class.

Any recommendations?

Thanks in advance!
 

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I would hate to be seen to contradict your wife's teacher but there is another school of thought on UV filters for digital cameras. Digital camera sensors are less susceptible to UV light than is traditional camera film and so there is little or no functionality added. Likewise, modern lens coatings are more advanced than they used to be making UV less of an issue. Except for the terminally clumsy or those who specialize in shots of sand storms, the protective value of UV filters is likewise overrated -especially if you routinely use the provided lens shade. A cheap filter, then, is more likely to degrade an image than to add value. Having said that, I use a Kenko Pro1d on my D90. It's reasonably available, thin and so less likely to provide vignetting and apparently made specifically for digital cameras (or so they claim).
 

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I agree with CRM14, it sounds like your wife's teacher is from the old school, 35mm era.

You really only need a clear filter (for protection against scratches) in the digital age, the camera already compensates for UV. You should still make sure you buy high quality glass though.

I have found that you can get filters much cheaper in the states than you can find them in Canada. Last time I was on vacation ordered a clear Nikon filter through Amazon for a fraction of what I could find in Canada.

EDIT: I may have to qualify my comments, I just did a quick google on this and the price difference is not a great as it once was...way to go Canadian dollar!!!
 

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+1 for clear "filters". Most of my lenses have one. I do have some UV filters from my film days and I just use them as protectors. The clear protectors I have are Hoya.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks folks!

That settles it, a clear filter it is.

My wife did say her teacher was older and seemed to be "old-school".

It's really great to have a forum such as this to get answers I feel I can trust!
 

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I agree with the other posters especially with respect to not getting a cheap filter.

If she is comfortable using a shade always and is careful she shouldn't need one. I have a lot of $ invested in my lenses so I always use one and with young kids it is easier to clean fingerprints off the filter. :eek:

Look for a clear "protector". I usually spend the money and buy Hoya filters but B+W & Tiffen are other brands I'd consider.

I wouldn't be as worried about it being a UV or Skylight as these filters are coated and thus less susceptible to flare than uncoated filters.

While you are at it a Circular Polarizer will be the only other filter she will probably ever need. It will make the sky pop & get rid of reflections from water surfaces & windows.

Most effects from filters can be simulated in post processing these days with the exception of polarizers and not scratching the front element of your lens.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If she is comfortable using a shade always and is careful she shouldn't need one. I have a lot of $ invested in my lenses so I always use one and with young kids it is easier to clean fingerprints off the filter. :eek:
Funny you should mention this; since she's gotten the camera she has always used the shade and was always very careful with the lens. Her teacher told her the shade would cause shadows in some conditions and recommended she remove it and get a UV filter instead.

We will hit some of the local stores in Ottawa to see if we can find a good deal on a Hoya. Failing that I'll just order it for her online.

Thanks!
 

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If the lens is designed without a shade or filter in mind, you may get vignetting. As mentioned earlier, a slim filter minimizes those chances.
 

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Mostly Agree

I liken the filter game to those situations when you are leaving a Toy Store and the salesperson asks if you'd like an "extended warranty".

I don't buy the protection argument at all.

In ancient days I had many filters, but most were for use with B&W film.

Now I only have one filter that I use and that is a circular polarizer. I paid big bucks to get a good one that fits my largest (non-drop-in filter) lens along with some step-down (or step-up) adapters so that it can be used on multiple lenses.

In 40 years of photography I've only scratched one lens and that was a free loaner from Canon (in the good old days), a 300mm F2.8 for which they didn't send the proper lens hood. If they had sent the proper lens hood instead of one which kept fallng off, then there would have been no scratches in 40+ years of shooting. Moreover, that lens used the soft fluorite glass as the front element. With reasonable care, one should not scratch a lens.
 

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...Her teacher told her the shade would cause shadows in some conditions and recommended she remove it and get a UV filter instead.
If the lens hood is designed for the lens then it will NEVER cause shadows from taking a picture. The only time you will run in to issues with a hood and shadows is using a pop-up flash where the shade may block the flash illumination to the lower part of the image.

A hood is designed to prevent lens flare when shooting towards a light source.

Most stores in Ottawa will stock clear protectors but 67mm is a bit of an odd-ball so check the stock on-line (you can do this for both Henry's & Vistek). Be warned, however, that Vistek is closed Sundays as is Henry's on Bank St.
 

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and be aware that clear filter is not always clear. B+W clear filter is a tad warmer than Hoya or Tiffen
 

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She ended up gettng the Hoya clear filter.

She like having the extra protection and hasn't noticed any differnence in the photos... I guess that's a good thing.
 

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I prefer Hoya too. IMHO it's the most neutral "clear filter" on the market.
 

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Ditto for the Hoya clear "protectors".

I can't afford to send one of my lenses in to Canon to replace the front element so I usually use a clear filter and the hood.
 
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