Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am embarking on a major home renovation with the opportunity to pre-wire and install speakers and AV components in any location and configuration I like. I presently have a audio-video-computer system which includes a Panasonic plasma TV, Onkyo AVR, Apple TV, Mac Mini, Sonos, and Shaw Cable. I could easily replace the TV with a large, high-quality monitor since it only displays output routed through the AVR via an HDMI cable; that is, I'm not using the TV's tuner at all. Instead of buying a new feature-rich TV I would prefer to go in the opposite direction - buy one or more large (50" or bigger) relatively "dumb" UHD monitors that I can connect to "smart" external components that include tuners, an AVR, etc. Also, I'd like to display art and photos on the monitor(s). I discovered a device - the "Frame" (at depict.com) that is a specialized 50" monitor designed to display high-res art on your wall. A thin, flat monitor installed flush with the wall could be used as a virtual photo / art frame, TV screen, and computer monitor. Has anyone gone the route I am considering? Any thoughts on which brand of monitor to buy? Top priorities are that the monitor(s) be UHD, 50" or larger, be flush- or recess-mounted on the wall, attractive (the "Frame" at depict.com looks like an art frame), and have a wide field of view.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
56,637 Posts
There are not usually that many monitors on the market. With a limited demand, these are often more expensive, even if they have fewer features (tuner, smarts, speakers, etc). There are probably at least three or four orders of magnitude more "TVs" than monitors, so since it's unlikely that you'll be saving, or getting additional "quality" it hasn't typically been worthwhile getting a monitor.

I'm not trying to dissuade you from the monitor route, it's just that it's not the same ballgame that it was 10-15 years ago when a monitor may have made more sense. TVs today are pretty thin. For wide viewing angle you'll need to look into an IPS panel if purchasing LED. These are better in every way except price too.

With a major renovation, it should be easy to recess a TV and make it look like you want, flush, whatever. Is 50" large enough? How far away from the TV are your eyes?

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/30-57s-home-theatre-faqs/76075-faq-how-large-hdtv-buy.html

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/30-...d-have-known-what-features-look-tvs-avrs.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,422 Posts
I use a monitor in my "office". I have a 23" LG monitor and can switch it between my Rogers box on the HDMI input or computer KVM on the DVI input. However, as 57 mentioned, I don't know you'd save much over a TV, particularly at larger sizes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,169 Posts
One thing to consider is that a monitor made to display art may not make a good TV. The main cost in TVs is the panel. In general, the price of monitors and TVs is tied to the cost of the panel. Extra features add some cost but they are not the major determining factor for price.

I always look for a TV that is moderately priced but has above average picture quality for the price point. My last purchase was a Vizio model that has a good quality display and LED array backlight that provides a very good picture. It was priced well below comparable models from other TV makers. The "smart" features are not used and added about $100 to the price. The alternatives were slightly lower priced TVs that were not "smart" but had a significantly poorer picture and were of lower quality in every respect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,915 Posts
I stayed at a bed and breakfast inn once. The owners had a satellite receiver and were using a digital monitor instead of a TV set. It was very cumbersome to operate. You needed one remote to turn on the satellite, but you had to turn on the monitor manually, and since the monitor did not have built in speakers, they used a pair of external pc speakers and you had to adjust the volume on them manually too. Infact the owner made an instruction sheet in every room for how to operate the tv, what order to turn on the components. I asked the owner about their interesting setup and he said he had the parts kicking around so he made use of them and he thought computer monitors displayed a sharper image than a tv. I told him for about $100 bux he could buy a nice 22" inch digital tv with component and hdmi input and use it instead. That way everything could be operated by one remote and he would not need the speakers either. He said he will think about it as they dont have these big box stores in this part of ontario.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
That's a very smart choice DSDunber. Exactly my thoughts of not having a rich TV.

More than one decades ago, this was a little problematic, when people use to have CRT monitors. I've seen someone use his monitor as TV but the screen wasn't quite clear. That's a very long time ago, maybe his cables were broken. I really don't know. But now that's not an issue at all. You can keep enjoying what you have and what you are doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,964 Posts
I do the opposite, and use a small TV as a computer monitor. And don't bother using any of it's hdmi inputs. Flip from TV tuner, to VGA / PC Input on a whim.
There is no point using a computer monitor any more these days for anything I would do.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top