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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a 43" 4k tv and I can't see a difference between native 4k (Netflix) content and 1080p content.
What should I be looking for?
Can a difference only be seen on larger screens?
 

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You need the Premium Netflix plan, a multimedia device or TV app that supports 4K streaming and a 25Mbps or higher internet connection to watch in 4K with Netflix. Even then it is not guaranteed. 4K streaming will deliver more picture detail and better sound with audio systems that support it. With a 43" TV, the difference will be discernible using a direct comparison between 4K and 1080p but may not be noticeable otherwise. If the content, service and TV support HDR, that will provide greater contrast. I have a 43" 4K TV (no HDR) but don't think it's worth paying the extra cost for the Premium Netflix plan since most content is 1080p.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I DO have 4k Netflix and my tv info shows it is 2160p.
I don't see more detail than the upscaled 1080p.
I have HDR but it seems a lot of 1080p content has HDR too.
 

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The 2160p may be what the TV is receiving from the streaming device (internal or external) and displaying. It doesn't necessarily mean the original content is 2160p. Don't know what else to say but just sit back and enjoy the TV and the show. A good 1080p show is still better than a bad 4k show.
 

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I have the 4k Premium Netflix and some of the content is stunning.

I have also found that HDR is far more important than 4k.

Can't say I've ever seen any 1080p content with HDR though.

I will add that if I use the Netflix app with my Bell Satellite receiver...it will not give me 4k/HDR.

I only use the TV's own (LG OLED) Netflix app and it works flawlessly.
 

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dm_4u: and you never will see it on 1080P. TPTB have decided that HDR goes with 4K even though it could just as easily been added to 1080P if they had wanted to do it. Instead they've made the majority come to believe that only 4K can have HDR. They've done this because they know, as one person has found here, that 4K by itself doesn't do much to improve the viewing experience on smaller screens and frankly even on medium size screens. Good HDR on the other hand helps to sell 4K TVs as something premium. Without it 4K would likely have gone the way of 3D. It is the HDR that is selling the TVs not 4K.

(I'm now waiting to see what they'll do to hype up sales of the next latest and greatest, 8K, which is going to be an even tougher sell than 4K but that's a topic for another thread).
 

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Every technology advance requires expensive factory retooling. Don't know what it costs to retool a panel manufacturing plant but it must be in the $100s of millions at least. It's not worth doing that for 1080p panels because the profit margins are too low. Manufacturers will spend the money on making improved 4K panels, OLED panels or 8K panels.
 

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Perhaps what reidw might be saying is why not put HDR on a 1080p Blu-ray to watch on my 4K TV panel which already has HDR. The industry wouldn't want to do this because it would cut into the marketing of UHD 4K Blu-ray, and make the difference between the two formats mostly negligible.
 

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You will never see the difference on that small of tv, experts say you need to sit 4 feet away from a 65 inch set to notice the difference. Some say they can see a difference, they are lying, the human eye can only discern so much. Now that doesn't mean there won't be any difference using a 4k set, usually there will be as 4k sets are usually higher end sets.
 

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4K panels tend to be better than 1080p panels because they are newer designs with better contrast, etc. The same goes for 1080p vs 720p. That's also why TVs with lower resolutions are so cheap. Apart from being less valuable in consumers' eyes, engineering and factory tooling costs were recovered years ago.

...why not put HDR on a 1080p Blu-ray to watch on my 4K TV panel which already has HDR[?]
This would benefit very few people. The disc would need a newer disc player with HDR. The HDR would most likely be lost with an existing HD players. Existing HD and UHD discs without HDR would look the same. People buying new players or discs to get HDR will buy UHD versions.
 
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