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Hi all,
Need some advice. I currently have a wireless router I bought about a year ago from futureshop for about $50. Dlink likely.
When I go to basement I get nothing. Actually if I go to the next room I get close to nothing. I want to really be able to access my wifi from anywhere in the house.
Would also like for my playstation not to choke when I am watching an HD avi. We have his and Her's iPhones and a PS3 and hoping to get an iPad. If at least 2 or three of these are on the web I don't want any lag.
What do you guys recommend?
 

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What model of D-Link? You might be able to install dd-wrt http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/index which would allow you to tweak your signal. Honestly though, I think streaming HD video over wireless is a pipe dream. I've had a router in the same room as the PS3 and still had stuttering when playing HD material.
 

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Rolando, you don't say what type of router you have, what the conditions are on why you are not getting any Wifi etc so its virtually impossible to help.

Honestly though, I think streaming HD video over wireless is a pipe dream.
Exactly.
 

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Rolando, you don't say what type of router you have, what the conditions are on why you are not getting any Wifi etc so its virtually impossible to help.

Exactly.
I wouldn't say that exactly.

720p HD video generally streams reliably over a wireless-n connection - at least that has been my experience. But of course 1080p requires a very strong, stable signal which is hard to get in most cases.

And generally speaking, if you can locate your wireless router in the basement, you may find the signal radiates upwards throughout the house better than downwards from an upstairs location. Again, that's been my experience and that of a few friends.
 

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^^^^
Another possibility for better coverage is to get another router and operate it in access point mode. That is, turn off DHCP etc. and connect to the local network only so that the data is bridged to it. You can also get an Asus WL-330ge, which is actually designed to work in that mode, among others.
 

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Another option as well of the above is better antenna on the router. but for the price the idea of going bridge is the best solution for better coverage. That is what I did in my house and I get 95% signal anywhere in the house without issue
 

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With a wireless-n router you would get better reception (g has better range but because of interference with everything from microwave ovens to cordless phones to even blutooth devices n will give you better performance).

Thing is, I keep reading how wireless-n routers will not operate in n-mode unless all present devices are able to operate in n. The iPod (an iPhone) support wireless-n but I believe it's still not enabled in software. Not sure about the PS3 or iPad.

I'm thinking of upgrading my wireless router myself, but hesitant to take the plunge because I am unsure if I'll get any noticeable improvements.
 

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It's probably worth noting the 2.4ghz wireless-N has better range than 5ghz wireless-n.

On a side note, the new Western Digital Livewire product has got decent reviews. It essentially uses your home electrical wiring as a distribution system for a network rather than wireless.

These types of products aren't new but this one had got the best reviews to date.
 

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Thing is, I keep reading how wireless-n routers will not operate in n-mode unless all present devices are able to operate in n. The iPod (an iPhone) support wireless-n but I believe it's still not enabled in software. Not sure about the PS3 or iPad.
The PS3 has only wireless-G built in. The iPad has wireless-N.

If you have both G and N devices then you need a dual band router to operate simultaneously at 2.4GHz and 5GHz. Essentially, you are running two wifi networks from one router. I have one of these routers (Linksys 610N) and I find that the N signal is notably weaker than the G signal. Doing some research, it seems this is a common scenario.
 

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^^^^
N also works on 2.7 GHz. Some N devices are 2.7 GHz only.
 

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2.7? Is that a typo? If you mean 2.4GHz then yes, I agree, but then you're subject to the interference that everyone talks about.
 

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^^^^
Sorry, it was a typo. I haven't had my morning beer yet. ;-)
 

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Rolando,

I just went through this dilemma myself. I ended up adding another NAT router/WI-FI adapter.

Depending on how tech-friendly you are, it is possible and reasonably priced.

1. Buy another NAT router/WI-FI adapter (any will do, but I do recommend one that will work with DD-WRT (if you're technically-minded).
2. Connect it, via network wire to a vacant network (LAN) port on the main router, running the wire to another part of the house where you want a stronger signal, connecting the other end of the cable to a LAN (not WAN) connection on the new router.
3. Configure or note the main router SSID, and change the channel to 1 (default is usually 6), configure the security password to as high a level as the new router will support (suggest WPA2-PSK).
4. Configure the secondary router to the same SSID name and then channel to 11 (as far away as possible from the main router), using the same security password as the main router).
5. Also configure the secondary router's main IP address to a static address that will work on your network (ie: main router is 192.168.0.1, secondary router is 192.168.0.2), and disable the DHCP services on the secondary router.
6. Also configure the new router to be an Access Point (AP) if that feature is controllable (it is on a DD-WRT router).
7. You now have two Access Points (APs) with the same name, and you can walk around your home with your laptop (or WI-FI enabled smart phone) and "roam" between the two APs without any changes. When you turn on your laptop for example, and you search for Wireless networks, you will see one name for both your routers, and you will have a strong signal when you're close to either of them, and hopefully an acceptable signal in between them.

I also agree with jayoldschool that you really should connect your PS3 through a wired connection if possible.
 

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if you can locate your wireless router in the basement, you may find the signal radiates upwards throughout the house better than downwards from an upstairs location. Again, that's been my experience and that of a few friends.
Nope, that's technically not a good idea. Whenever possible, the router should be above-grade for best performance.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hi guys, thanks for all the advice.

What I currently have is a D-Link WBR 2310

Live in a 5 plex on the ground floor with a finished basement. 3 bedrooms on ground floor, big living room (where PC and router are) same size kitchen/dining area. also basement with about half the living space becase other half is 2 door garage.

Ideally want to get wifi in the kitchen that is on other side of house from PC as well as the basement but right know the signal is even weak in master bedroom which is literally 8 to 10 footsteps away from the PC and router.

Now PS 3is is going back in living room and I am going wired. However our ipod touch and 2 iPhones need to get good wifi.
will my iphone 3GS and my wife's iphone 4 benefit from getting a new N-router?

I am not very tech savy. basically I am thinking of getting rid of this one and buying a new wireless router. what would you guys recommend?
 
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