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Hi All:

I recently installed Ubuntu on a donated old laptop (2004 vintage) as part of a refurb for a non-profit I have joined. Decided to play around a bit while waiting for OEM XP install disks to arrive.

I am stuck with this: even though I installed Ubuntu via the CD/DVD drive, I cannot find the drive in the file system and cannot find any files contained on inserted DVDs.

It seems that I must go to "terminal" and enter long strings of command line commands in order to "mount" this drive. I may also have to manually edit certain files in order to accomplish this.

I've been on the Ubuntu support site and other "Linux Guru" web sites, and tried all sorts of recommended command line strings, and all I get is incomprehensible error messages.

My question is this: is this the reality of Linux and Ubuntu? Do I really have to become expert in lengthy and arcane command line strings in order to deal with everyday concerns?

If so, my observation is that this just isn't for me. It reminds me of DOS in 1982.
 

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I don't use Ubuntu, so I can't help with the details, but with OpenSUSE, when I insert a CD or DVD it's automatically mounted under /media

It might help if you mention what computer you're using.
 

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HP Compaq nw8000

Hi James:

The machine is pretty solid, if a bit old. An HP Compaq nw8000, 2004 vintage.

I looked under /media and everywhere else I could to find the drive or the files that were on known good DVDs in the drive.

I downloaded various utilities which apparently can mount drives when run. It is worth noting that the machine now has a phantom floppy drive that does not exist in the laptop's hardware and cannt be removed from Ubuntu.

My question stands: is this the reality of Ubuntu? Command line woes?
 

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^^^^
No, it's not the reality. It's something peculiar to your computer. Perhaps someone with Ubuntu experience can help you.
 

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Camera.Ken said:
is this the reality of Linux and Ubuntu?
Of course not. In your case it is a question that Ubuntu users can answer best since other Linux distros mount it under /media and pop up a window menu asking you what you want to do with the inserted DVD.

I need to install Ubuntu into a virtual machine so that I can get more familiar with it. I'm a Mandriva/Red Hat/Fedora/CentOs Linux user.
 

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your situation is very strange...Ubuntu is really reliable when it comes to mount. Post the results of a look at etc/fstab and this should show how the install messed up the /media mount for /dev/cdrom. We can then compare it to a normal setup with any of the Ubuntu varients. BTW I would suggest trying Mint Linux before giving up on Linux
I think you will dump the idea of going back to XP once you see what it can do without having to install all the so called "proprietary" codecs... etc ...I have an older Pentium M t42 IBM that I put one gig of ram in and because the processor has 2meg of l2 cache it compiles software really quick. I even does a respectable job of high bit rate trans-coding video with handbrake. It is almost as fast as my Athlon 64x2 and Vista and one heck of a lot less nonsense than using software that thinks I am trying to steal content!

PS. sorry... I meant etc/fstab and auto-mount is the default with all Ubuntu variants so sounds like there is definitely something wrong...or you are still just running from the live file system and not a hard-drive install. I have done this before when I forgot and booted from the live disk instead of the install that I did....and I have run Linux for over 12 years!

With a correct Linux install if I stick in a video dvd it will automatically play with VLC my choice of player. If the disk has any kind of data on it the file browser just pops up....with usb drives I just connect my camera and browse to the dcim folder and there are the thumbs.

The default dvd authoring software in Ubuntu/Mint will let me save a vid dvd to hard-drive as an ISO and VLC will play that same iso directly from my hard-drive. Try that with a Windows machine without the ability of some extra software to create ISOs.

So essentially a well installed Linux will do everything you do with any form of Windows only with free (as in beer) software. With the added bonus of not having to run stupid intermediate virus scanning to make sure you will not hose your system. Linux does not install anything automatically unless you give it permission to do so....an essential security setting.... something that Windows users are finally learning about!
 

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Hi EricReesor:

Thank you for your answer, and your offer to help.

But I am simply taking a look at Ubuntu / Linux in a casual way before installing XP on this and 3 other machines as a refurb job for my little not-for-profit.

It is becoming all a little too complex for me -- poring through ect/fstab and then posting it here is more than I wanted to do.

The answer to my question is loud and clear, however. Ubuntu does not require command-line skills and file editing, except in occasional cases (like mine) where something goofy is happening.
 

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Um, yes this is the reality of many Linux installations. The CDROM, or USB or floppy for that matter, almost never automounts as the default. There are likely very good security reasons behind that but just the same, that's what I've seen. I've used Red Hat(quite a long time ago), Mandrake, and Debian recently, none of which automount any media.
My guess is a lot of people like Camera.Ken pack it in within ten minutes of the install completion and go back to Windows, that always automounts everything....but hey, some people are fond of DOS from '82.
 

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Mentioning DOS from '82 in comparison to Linux is really just an admission that all computers underneath their eye candy graphics essentially look the same to an untrained person sitting in front of a monitor. It's true. What is also true is that Linux is many orders of magnitude more capable than DOS of '82. They are worlds apart in capability.

I read plenty of posts here at this site from Windows users who get bogged down by screen messages that are shown on a (insert music of doom) command line or blue text screen. Do you compare those situations to DOS of '82 too?

So, comparing Linux to DOS of '82 is funny if this is supposed to be comedy, but it is really not much more than hyperbole from an admittedly confused beginner who may simply have used a badly burned install disc or other matter.

Anyways if you really, earnestly want to give Linux a fair shake then I'll help. For a non-profit organization It is a godsend! :)
 

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The CDROM, or USB or floppy for that matter, almost never automounts as the default.
Ummm... I guess someone forgot to tell my computers. I'm running OpenSUSE and it most certainly automounts all those.
 

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Hiya Camera.Ken.
Ubuntu is pretty solid, and the behavior you mention is unusual ( in my opinion ).Your machine is old enough that you may have problems even with XP......and I can remember having to descend to dos to get windows going on some of the old buggers ( "terminal and cli is your FRIEND").



EDIT: Did a little googling (sp?), you might wanna look at this (http://www.tt-solutions.com/vz/hardware/hpnw8000/ )
 
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