Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
81 - 100 of 775 Posts

·
OTA Forum Moderator
Joined
·
24,867 Posts
Hey, there you go, Ontarians: call your MPP and demand to know why Quebec is doing a better job of converting its public broadcaster than Ontario is! :D

Seriously though, I'm impressed with Quebec's approach while Ontario and BC continue to muddy the water around the futures of TVO and Knowledge Network, respectively.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,950 Posts
"CRTC is currently working on plans for a possible subsidy to help defray the costs for over-the-air viewers to purchase digital receiving equipment."

I didn't think this was confirmed yet? If so, they've got a little over a year left so they better get on with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,255 Posts
For example, Quebec's public broadcaster is planning to converting *all* its analog OTA transmitters to digital by August 2011 — even in small markets.
Although true, not quite a valid comparison since Télé-Québec only has 12 stations and 5 repeaters. TVO on the other hand has 24 full power and 152 low-power transmitters.

Another factor is a much larger percentage of those in Quebec (especially those who speak French) receive their TV OTA than in any other place in Canada, so keeping these transmitters on the air is significantly more politically important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
And Télé-Québec airs commercials. I'm not sure what the proportion of government funding is, relative to commercial revenues. That, coupled with the higer proportion of OTA viewers than elsewhere in the country, could be a factor.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,734 Posts
That's fair. So let's trim back the numbers a bit. According to TVO's website:
TVO said:
Ninety per cent of the Ontario market accesses TVO through cable and satellite, and 10% of households capture the TVO signal over-the-air. Our broadcast distribution includes 23 major transmitter sites and 150 low-power rebroadcast transmitter locations throughout Ontario.
So let's leave the low-power relays off the table.
That's 23 high- and medium-power OTA transmitters — a more manageable target anyway.
Wikipedia lists them as serving the following communities:
Belleville, Chatham, Cloyne, Hawkesbury, Huntsville, Kenora, Kingston, Kitchener, London, McArthur's Mills (Bancroft), North Bay, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Parry Sound, Pembroke, Penetanguishene, Peterborough, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Timmins, Toronto, Windsor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,255 Posts
That's 23 high- and medium-power OTA transmitters — a more manageable target anyway.
I am not so sure how manageable transitioning 23 transmitters in a little over a year is. I doubt if any Canadian broadcasters will have that many transmitters transitioned by the deadline (just a guess on my part). The problem is, if they go beyond the 6 mandatory markets in Ontario and don't do all of them, where do they draw the line on which other ones will be transitioned?

In some of these markets they might be able to work out a deal where they can share a transmitter with other stations. In others, they may need to do it alone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,734 Posts
You're right, roger1818 — if only broadcasters (not just TVO) hadn't waited until the last moment to get it all done. (Even Télé-Québec, which appears to be super organized with its DTV plans, will need an extra two weeks past the deadline to move equipment around and complete its transition in 2011.)
At least we know the mandatory markets (Toronto/Hamilton/Barrie, London, Windsor, Kitchener, Thunder Bay) will have OTA access to TVO by deadline. That's five transmitters out of 23.
I'd argue that if TVO can swing it, it should convert all their transmitters in the Windsor-Ottawa corridor by the August 2011 transition deadline. So on top of the five listed above, you'd also have Belleville, Chatham, Kingston and Peterborough.
Unless I'm missing a transmitter or two, that's five mandatory and four optional markets. It would be a terrific start for TVO and provide OTA digital TV service to a majority of Ontarians.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
You're right, roger1818 — if only broadcasters (not just TVO) hadn't waited until the last moment to get it all done. (Even Télé-Québec, which appears to be super organized with its DTV plans, will need an extra two weeks past the deadline to move equipment around and complete its transition in 2011.)
At least we know the mandatory markets (Toronto/Hamilton/Barrie, London, Windsor, Kitchener, Thunder Bay) will have OTA access to TVO by deadline. That's five transmitters out of 23.
I'd argue that if TVO can swing it, it should convert all their transmitters in the Windsor-Ottawa corridor by the August 2011 transition deadline. So on top of the five listed above, you'd also have Belleville, Chatham, Kingston and Peterborough.
Unless I'm missing a transmitter or two, that's five mandatory and four optional markets. It would be a terrific start for TVO and provide OTA digital TV service to a majority of Ontarians.
Add Ottawa. I bet that's an easy one, as CBOFT-DT channel 22 pre-transition transmitter on TVO's Camp Fortune Antenna is bound to be frequency agile enough for channel 24. I'm sure CBC is planning on a new transmitter for CBOFT-DT on channel 9 post-transition, with its antenna at the top of the mast instead of the TVO antenna half-way up..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,255 Posts
Unless I'm missing a transmitter
You forgot Ottawa, so that is 6 mandatory markets in Ontario.

it should convert all their transmitters in the Windsor-Ottawa corridor by the August 2011 transition deadline.
What is so special about the Windsor-Ottawa corridor? If you are going to go beyond the mandatory markets, it should be strictly based on population. Using that, Sudbury should be next in line.

you'd also have Belleville, Chatham, Kingston and Peterborough
Though probably unpopular, some might argue that a Belleville doesn't really need its own transmitter as it is just over 60km from the from Peterborough transmitter and just over 70km from the Kingston transmitter. It is also the least populous of the group.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,255 Posts
I bet that's an easy one, as CBOFT-DT channel 22 pre-transition transmitter on TVO's Camp Fortune Antenna is bound to be frequency agile enough for channel 24.
Alternately, TVO might buy SunTV's transmitter if they do indeed go off-air in January. CBC might be able to re-use their transmitter elsewhere in the country.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,734 Posts
Of course. Ottawa. I knew I forgot something.
As for what's special about the corridor, it's densely populated, but I can see an argument for adding Sudbury to the list of places for DTV conversion.
Reminding myself now that this is all just wishlists and speculation at this point — but it's fun to pretend. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,334 Posts
I know this is an OTA forum but most of us get TVO via a BDU - when will they start providing an HD feed to BDUs if all of their equipment is ready sans transmitter? In other words, why doesn't Rogers have TVO-HD adjacent to every other Canadian network which is available in HD?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
This is skipping back a topic, but what would be the point of TVO spending money transitioning in non-mandatory markets if no one else does? In that case, who is actually going to have OTA equipment set up for 1 channel? I can't imagine any other broadcaster worrying about TVO having a monopoly in some areas (OTA).

I am eagerly awaiting the Toronto switch to digital. I like watching TVO sometimes but can't pick it up on my HDHomerun, so I just don't bother watching it most of the time now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,809 Posts
Just curious...

Where did this idea of mandatory/non-mandatory markets come from? Did the Americans do anything like this? All it seems to be doing is confusing the issue and making it likely that Canada will be messy mix of analog and digital signals for many years to come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
Tvo and CBC could lead in non mandatory markets by broadcasting 720p and leasing the other 3 sub channels to the other networks. That's 6 SD sub channels that could be used for CTV, Global, CBC-F, City, Omni1 and Omni2

Two digital transmitters provided by gov funding can be a cost effective way of improving the OTA infrastructure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,809 Posts
Who Wants SD?

hkaye says: "That's 6 SD sub channels that could be used for CTV, Global, CBC-F, City, Omni1 and Omni2"

Why would anyone want SD channels for anything any more? The less SD is encouraged/supported the sooner all viewers will upgrade their TVs. We should be looking to the future not to the past although I guess it shows maybe Marshall McLuhan was right about the "marching into the future while looking through the rear view mirror".
 
81 - 100 of 775 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top