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Discussion Starter #1
There is no traffic over the WAN. Just the LAN.

When I reboot the Dlink NAS DNS-323 the traffic stops momentarily.
When I reboot my netbook the traffic stops momentarily.
I turned off the iTunes service on the DNS-323. Something is still causing an 800kbps 24/7 data stream and I can't figure out what.

Could the SMB share on the NAS cause this much traffic? Netstat reports this.

TCP EEEPC:1232 dlink:microsoft-ds TIME_WAIT
TCP EEEPC:1256 dlink:microsoft-ds TIME_WAIT
TCP EEEPC:1258 dlink:microsoft-ds TIME_WAIT
TCP EEEPC:1265 dlink:microsoft-ds TIME_WAIT
TCP EEEPC:1277 dlink:microsoft-ds ESTABLISHED

I have been fiddling with iTunes and WMP to organize a large MP3 collection on the NAS. If a process got orphaned (iTunes did lock upon me) I would have thought a reboot would have fixed it. But the 800kbps chatter returns almost immediately upon reboot.

Anyone have any suggestions?
 

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Doesn't iTunes always snoop a directory looking for new files?

It's probably some random filesystem service just going around looking for changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Using my finely honed goggling skills :) I figured it out. It was my printer that is connected to the DNS-323. I killed the print service and the network traffic dropped to nothing. OK off for another drink before I enter 2011.

But you are right iTunes and WMP can snoop and organize your music collection for you. Normally it only occurs when the apps are running.
 

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Hi Jake - glad you solved the problem.

I use Wireshark for troubleshooting network problems - it's free. Even if you don't want to get into decoding individual packets, you can at least see which device is generating the traffic.
 

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^^^^
I have used Wireshark, both at work and home, for many years, and you're right it is quite useful. However, one issue is most people use switches these days, which means you can only see stuff addressed to the computer you're running it on. This limits what you can see to broadcasts and traffic specifically intended for that computer. Back in the days of hubs or the old coax networks, all data was visible on all computers. On managed switches, you can usually set up one port to monitor one or more others, so you can watch the traffic on those ports. You can also get data "taps" that plug in between the switch and device. I have often used an old 10 Mb hub in the same manner.

Bottom line, Wireshark is a great tool, but you have to be aware of the limitations of using it on a switch connected network.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the Wireshark tip. In my case my Tomato router provided me with Real time graphs of usage. I could see it at the router level. I just could not determine which device (DSi, Wii, Apple TV, WDTV, NAS, printer, Slingbox, PC or netbook was responsible.

I still don't know why the netbook was talking to the printer via USB (which is connected to the NAS).
 

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^^^^
Wireshark will tell you the IP and MAC addresses. I have it installed on my Linux based firewall as well as my other computers. A tool like it is essential for solving many network problems. As I mentioned, if you can find an old hub, you can use it to monitor traffic going to your internet connection. Of course, by forcing 10 Mb, half duplex, you might change the situation enough that it affects the problem. One very nice feature of Wireshark is the way it can follow a TCP stream, which makes it easier to resolve problems.
 
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