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Hi

My RTi A9's just arrived and I am curious about bi-amping them..1 the benefits and 2 if I even can. I have never owned a speaker that gave me that option so I am a bit confused on the terminology. I did my research but I am still confused..sorry
My AVR is the Pioneer VSX-32. In its docs it does give instruction on how to bi-amp your speakers but I keep thinking in my head that I need 2 amps

thanks
 

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I am curious about bi-amping them..1 the benefits and 2 if I even can. ... My AVR is the Pioneer VSX-32. In its docs it does give instruction on how to bi-amp your speakers but I keep thinking in my head that I need 2 amps
Normally, you have one pair of amplifier channels (front L+R) powering both your main (L+R) speakers. Each channel powers all of the drivers in one speaker enclosure.

With bi-amping, one pair of amplifier channels (or one dedicated two-channel amplifier) powers each front speaker. Within each speaker enclosure, the tweeter is powered by one channel, and the woofer (or remaining drivers, if more than one) is powered by the other channel.

Is there an advantage to bi-amping? Some say yes, some say no. Try it out, see what you think.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks eljay...I have extra wire so I will give it a try...I assume by your post that I understood the pioneer manual correctly and it can do that.

S
 

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If the manual says you can "bi-amp", that means it can do it. It'll probably tell you to:
- assign one of the surround channels to "bi-amp" duty; and
- remove the metal jumpers that link the two pairs of binding posts on each of the front speakers.
(Note: This second step is very important. Do not leave the jumpers in place when bi-amping or bi-wiring.)

If you decide you don't care for bi-amping, re-install the jumpers and power the speakers with just the front L+R amp channels.
 

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Most people don't realize it, but they already have all the benefit of bi-amping/wiring if they use a powered subwoofer. The sub amp is taking care of the wattage for the bass and the AVR sends the signals below the crossover point to the sub, assuming the LFE settings are "sub only" and not "both" and assuming you set the speakers to "small", which is usually the better option. This would leave the AVR with plenty of power to handle the rest of the frequency range. Of course, feel free to experiment if you have a bunch of speaker wire hanging around.

With these speakers, you can probably reduce the crossover point, however, you should probably let MCACC handle it.

There are plenty of previous threads on the topic if you search for biamp or similar terms, etc. Also, bi-amping really does nothing if the AVR doesn't actually have separate amps - some do, some don't. I didn't bother checking your particular AVR but others here may know...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone..much appreciated!

Ok so I set it up normal and bi-amp...I didn't notice any difference but in fairness my ears aren't as good as they used to be with loud parties concerts and welding shops:)
I did notice one thing though..the binding post just won't stay tight. I am using just bare wire( stranded 14 G)..would tinning them help stay tight ? or just go to bananas.
I've done my research and most seem to think bare is better but with dangers.

thanks

S
 

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quote:.."I've done my research and most seem to think bare is better but with dangers."

Isn't that always the case :p

On a more serious note you have a chance of a wire coming loose off a binding post.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
...so to fix the binding post from loosening I tinned just the ends so that most of the wire is still copper and put some Threadlocker (blue)on just the top part of the thread ..works like a charm..and all is nice and tight..do not use the red or you may never get them off!!..

S
 

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Tinning wires is not recommended since it leads to poor connections with time. That's especially true of lead based solder. Tinning wires for electrical connections is illegal in Canada due to the problems it causes. I find that solid wires work best for stationary speakers. I won't get into the voodoo science that justifies solid wires but it makes binding post connections easier.
 

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Stirling said:
I am using just bare wire( stranded 14 G)..would tinning them help stay tight ? or just go to bananas.
I vote for banana plugs. They're convenient and fairly inexpensive, especially if you order from a Hong Kong vendor on eBay.

(I'll PM you a link to a vendor I've bought from. I like the style, quality and price of a particular line of plugs he sells.)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
all my wire is bought and installed so chucking it and going solid isn't in the cards this time. I will try and just tin the tip or just use the threadlock without tinning and see how well the strands stay together..
thanks everyone and thanks for the link eljay
 

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Discussion Starter #13
This may be an obvious question to most but if you leave the jumpers on a bi-amp speaker does it matter if you connect the wires on the top 2 posts or the bottom?

thanks
 

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No, it does not matter if you're not bi-amping, provided the jumpers are properly in place.

Does the speaker manual say anything on the topic?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
no..not that I could find..just info on how to bi-amp and the damage you could do if you DO not remove the jumpers

thanks 57
 

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One more note Stirling - check out Roger Russell's pages here:

http://www.roger-russell.com/

He is an audio engineer who designed speakers for what I consider the holy grail of audio equipment, McIntosh. This guy will forget more about acoustics than I will ever know.

Regardless, his web pages are a fantastic source of information for any audio afficionado.
 
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