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I'm pretty sure I still have a bunch of Amiga 3.5 inch floppy game discs stored somewhere in my basement. Heck, I may still have an Amiga 500 stored somewhere in my basement.
 

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I guess I shouldn't have thrown out my old C64 game floppies. :eek:
 

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I still use my Amiga 2000HD. Also have a C64 in storage...
I thought Commodore was long dead!
 

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Found memories!

This wasn't my first computer--that had been a Commodore Vic-20, a machine with the same body as the C64 but with just 2 kilobytes of memory. I can recall using that little machine with my old friend to write the most elementary little BASIC programs:



Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-20050585-52.html#ixzz1IgqbZz8m
I too owned a Vic-20 first. I was in the military then and some of us had ordered our Vic-20 through one of our coworker soldier that was going on assignment in the US. The main reason for those Vic-20s was to use them to learn basic programming provided by a Warrant Officer which was the president of our computer club. I was in a young marriage then and I can recall having to give up the Vic-20 programming as my young wife was complaining I was going to bed too late at night so I had to give up my Vic-20 training/pleasure to do my young husband duty. The Vic-20 was fun but never the young bride had to twist my harm to accomplish my duty (I was a soldier afterall!!) :cool:

When I was on my PL5 (Course/training that led to Full technician status upon completion) electronic course/training the Commodore 64 was the new favored toy and I can recall our troop playing games during our lunch periods. This was a good tool to keep the troops together and high morale within those troops. The Vic-20 was now in my eyes a boat anchor and I was drooling about this new Commodore 64. When I was transferred to Inuvik North West Territories, our CANEX (small Canadian military exchange) was closing few months before the station it self and I could not resist getting my hands on one of those Commodore 64 being let go at ridiculous pricing (I made sure to bring back a huge microwave oven and portable dish washer to prompt WAF) :cool:

I remember the quality of the Commodore CRT monitor. It was so good that the Commodore had erected its home in our bedroom. This fine piece of art was used as a basic computer, gaming station along with heavy usage as a bedroom monitor and I guess it was kind of my first theater like experience. My VHS and Beta players were both hooked up to the monitor for endless movie watching in the comfort of our love nest.

My Commodore 64 was put to rest (in storage) for a year when I was transferred to Bermuda as the beautiful beaches had for some reason a greater appeal. When I came back to Canada/Ottawa, I was glad to see my old friend again and use/abuse it during the long Canadian winters evenings/nights. However, the Commodore 128 was the new attraction and my loyalty/love was moving away from my dear 64. We had purchase a home in Gatineau then and with 2 young children I decided to part away with the 64 and accessories in order to provide the money around the new home and family which now had all of the priorities. At times, I had some regrets parting away with this great toy but I survived.

All of this babble to finally say that if this is more than a rumor I would love to acquire the new version of the toy and integrate it to the HT. This would be great timing as I could introduce the soon to be 4 (at at present 3 and 1 more to come in the fall) grand children to the joy and entertainment of the Commodore 64. I was thinking of a gaming station the past year or so for the grand kids but I might wait and see what the Commodore 64 has to offer in this time and age.:cool:
 

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Heehee, still have mine... I think? I had the whole 9, the cassette thing, and disk reading boaster thing I think? have a bunch of games on disk and cassette tape, man I should look for it and plug it back in, last time I had it in use the printer finally ran out of ink. I loved that thing.
 

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Commodore is long dead. The name an IP rights have bounced around since the 1990s.

This new C-64 is just an Atom PC in a C-64 like case, but supposedly includes a C-64 emulator package.

We too are, or were a Commodore house, with the Vic-20, C-64, and A-500. I still have much of the stuff. I liked the Wico brand sticks best, Sega second.
I have (or had) an original Atari stick that played particularily well with an Amgia game called Lotus Esprit Turbo. I also made accessories. For the C-64, I made a hexadecimal keyboard to enter program listings from Compute! magazine using their entry system (plugged into the joystick port; was made from an old adding machine keyboard). For the Amiga, I made an adapter to add two more joystick ports to play Gauntlet in 4 player mode.
 

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I still have my Commodore SX-64 all in one with the 3" built in colour CRT down in storage. A friend of mine also recently gave me his old C64, and a couple of 1541 Floppy Drives. I've got a couple game disks around somewhere in my basement. I'm always meaning to pull it out for nostalgia, but I never seem to get around to it.

I also have an Amiga 500, but I've got absolutely no software for it which is unfortunate.
 

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The Commodore 64, that '80s computer icon, lives again

It was chunky, a hideous tan color, and, by today's standards, ridiculously feeble.
It was limited to 64 kilobytes of memory -- about the equivalent of one long e-mail.
And yet 25 years ago, almost everyone seemed to have one.
It was the Commodore 64, an 8-bit, mass-produced machine that brought personal computing into the home for millions of users in the early- and mid-1980s. People used their C64s, as they were known, for everything from basic office functions to primitive games like "Impossible Mission."
Commodore sold more than 17 million of its C64 systems, according to the company. The Guinness Book of World Records lists the Commodore 64 as the best-selling single computer model of all time.
"Spent hours and hours writing little programs for my then very young kids .... happy days," wrote Ian Mumby last month on a Commodore 64 Facebook page. "Still have the c64 in the loft, may have to go dig it out and play."
Now, nearly three decades after it debuted in 1982, the Commodore 64 is making a comeback. The company that built it, Commodore International, went bankrupt in 1994. But a revived outfit, Commodore USA, plans to release a line of retro-looking Commodore computers this month that have modern components inside.
http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/gaming.gadgets/05/09/commodore.64.reborn/index.html?hpt=C2
 

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That computer was heavily used by amatuer radio ops to set up as a SSTV machine. I still have the plans somewhere.
 

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The C64 is still very popular, you should see the various forums out there. People are still writing new games/code for various software and hardware. I had a C64 back in the day and we got our monies worth out of it. I eventually got a PC in the early 90's then the C64 went into storage. I pulled it out maybe 5 years ago and they (2 C64's) no longer worked. I tossed those, but I still have 2 disk drives, power supplies, 1802 monitor and a bunch of games on floppies and some in their original boxes.
 

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I still have my Vic 20. It's in the cold room next to my rotary telephone. The game cartridges were sold to a collector years ago for $4 for the set.
Remember typing out pages of BASIC from computer magazines? ;) C64 was beyond my budget. A friend gave me the CRT... Top quality picture!
 
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