Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just wired my whole house with Cat6e and RG6 and one of the sub-contractors tore off most of labels on the wires.
I now have a bunch of wires in the basement with no way to trace them back to the rooms.
Anyone know of a way to test the cables so I can find the 2 ends?
Any help would be appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,188 Posts
While the toner is an excellent method, all that's needed is a multimeter and clip lead. Use the clip lead to short the far end and then use the meter to check for continuity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
This is true, but that can be tedious if you have a lot of wires, because you then have to strip back the wire connect your multimeter to every one until you find and eliminate the one you've got shorted. Lather, rinse, repeat for however many there are...

Personally, I'd get the subcontractor responsible to come back and do the work. Or at least bill him for the time it takes you to do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
If they've got plugs already, and a laptop and switch, you can have someone go from room to room plugging a laptop (or other device) into each port.
At the origin, connect all the cables to switch and watch for the ports to light up when connected. Note which jack your partner plugged into as each lights up.

Probably not the most elegant solution, but should be quicker than multimeter tests.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
on the other hand does it really matter?

Though I've traced and labelled all mine (wire toner is great), since the router and cable distribution all in the basement was easy enough to get the initial splits correct but then everything else downstream was equal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
If you haven't done it already, a solution that I have used in the past is to crimp a RJ45 connector with a very short length of cable to it. Strip all the wires inside and connect them together. That will create your short circuit. Now to test continuity, you do the same as the last step and crimp a connector onto a short length of wire and strip back any two wires. Then use your multimeter to test for continuity. Et voila! Now you can test even if the cable are terminated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,188 Posts
^^^^
A few years ago, I picked up an Ethernet cable tester from Tiger Direct for about $10, which works well. I don't see any at that price on their web site now, but the do have others starting at about $30. The testers have two parts, one for each end of the cable, and test for continuity, shorts and crosswiring.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top