Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Member #1
Joined
·
47,683 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The following are the Capitol Sales Company top ten tips for custom installers for optimal system design and installation.

Some tips are to help the installer but I thought they would be useful for anyone designing Front-Projector Home Theater System .

Feel free to comment
 

·
Member #1
Joined
·
47,683 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
1.) Bigger Picture and Bigger Sound

Look for opportunities to suggest a room for big impressions. The room should be isolated from noise and distractions with enough space for a ceiling mounted projector, screen, associated equipment and ability to control the light. Make sure your customer understands the benefits and disadvantages of the large image along with how a reflected view through projection is different than a direct view on a flat screen television.

2.) The Room and the Screen

Your ceiling height will determine the size of the image—the higher the ceiling potentially the bigger the image. You'll also need to determine which wall will be best for viewing, equipment and seating arrangements in the room. And, you'll need to determine whether a wall-mounted screen or retractable option will be best for the application and homeowner's preference.

3.) Math for Sizing the Screen

First, determine the top of the viewing area for your screen. Minimum should be 6 inches from the ceiling for fixed screens and 12 inches for retractable screens.

* Measure to the floor.
* Subtract 3 feet for height of viewing area from the floor
* Multiply by 1.33 for width of 4:3 screen
* Multiply by 1.78 for width of 16:9 screen


4.) Math for Seating Distance from the Screen

There is an ideal seating distance from the screen for viewing that's easy to calculate. First, you determine the actual width of the screen. Seats should be positioned between 1½ to 2½ times the width of the screen.

Example: a 110-inch with a 16:9 screen has an actual width of 96 inches.

* 96 inches x 1.5 = 12 feet for nearest seating
* 96 inches x 2.5 = 20 feet for farthest seating


5.) Project Location

Mounting the projector on the ceiling works best because the projector will be out of harm's way. When measuring, remember to take into consideration where the wiring will go and spacing for the brackets to hold the projector. The distance you'll need to be from the screen varies greatly by project, so it is best to determine the projector that will be used before prewiring. If you wire to near the end of the range of the projector, it will provide you with more options if you need them once you begin setting up the equipment. If you have not determined a projector, most will work if you wire to an area 1.75 times the width of the screen.

6.) Offset Project Lens

Lenses are not always in the middle of the projector so consider this before you begin mounting the project in order to center it properly. Some models do have horizontal and vertical lens shift built in, which will make you job a bit easier. Connections can also be in different locations depending on projector type so make sure you have the projector available when you are planning where the wires will be located in the ceiling.

7.) The Wires

Here are some of the wires you need to consider for the source signal:

* RF for cable TV or off air
* Composite (VCR or "Legacy" source) cable or RG59 pure copper
* SVHS cable or 2 RG59 pure copper or Cat5
* Component cable or 3 RG59 pure copper or serial digital
* RGBHV in one jacket i.e. IXOS XHV806CL or Monster MCTSRGBM5-250
* HDMI for best picture quality
* VGA for computer connection
* 12 volt trigger out for electric screen control
* Carlon raceway—1.5 inch for the next great thing or a replacement
* 2 conductors for IR connection
* 2-6 Cat5 wires for future add-ons

You may only need a few of these wires for your current project, but always prepare for the future with extra wires or a flexible raceway.

8.) Backlit Learning Remote

Consider upgrading the remote to one that will be more user-friendly. Look for a learning remote that's easy to program, and one that is backlit so your customers can easily pick up the remote and use it when they are sitting in the comfort of their easy chair in a darkened room.


9.) Equipment Location

Ideally, the equipment can be placed out of sight for fewer distractions. You'll need to ensure the space is properly ventilated because the equipment will get hot. Make sure you quote a proper rack setup along with fans to help keep equipment cool and protected. Because the equipment is out of sight, you'll need to include an IR repeater as part of the setup. And make sure to include media storage space.

10.) Power and Protection

Plan for enough amperage and surge protection for all equipment in your system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,614 Posts
4.) Math for Seating Distance from the Screen

There is an ideal seating distance from the screen for viewing that's easy to calculate. First, you determine the actual width of the screen. Seats should be positioned between 1½ to 2½ times the width of the screen.

Example: a 110-inch with a 16:9 screen has an actual width of 96 inches.

* 96 inches x 1.5 = 12 feet for nearest seating
* 96 inches x 2.5 = 20 feet for farthest seating
Everyone's opinion will differ, but I think a reasonable rule of thumb for minimum seating distance is the diagonal in inches / 10, to give a distance in feet.

Thus, a 110" screen has a reasonable minimum seating distance of 11 feet.

That's equivalent to less than 1.4X width. Some people even consider 1.3X acceptable (although it's a little too close for my tastes). However, at these close distances (whether it'd be 1.3X or 1.5X width), screen door effect may become visible, with certain types of projectors.

I'm perfectly happy to sit at 1.8X back though.
 

·
Member #1
Joined
·
47,683 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
CLeaned up thread
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top