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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just subscribed to TELUS Wireless home phone yesterday, I live in Newfoundland. The caption ad reads:

“Telus Wireless Home Phone is a new, affordable alternative to traditional home phone. Keep your existing home phone number and enjoy unlimited nationwide calling from $10 a month.”

Using it I can confirm it connects to the Cell phone towers. I added it to my cell phone plan yesterday. Apparently Koodo has it too from what I was told ! The box that they give you says Alcatel on it.
 

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If the power goes out its out. So it doesn't take a lot to set up but for non telus customers, $30 is to steep for effectively voip type service. I know its not voip but it woould replace my voip which is about $5/month.
good for those with telus mobility though
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, I’m only paying $10 I’ve been a TELUS mobility customer for about 7 months. I have Rogers Ignite internet and TV service as well because everyone loves the internet but I wasn’t enticed by the options of a home phone, until now. Rogers Mobility sucks in this part of the country, I could go to the Gould’s and lose service and their LTE seriously is lacking here, I had it before and don’t miss it.
 

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...I have Rogers Ignite internet and TV service...
Just as an FYI, you may wish to not use the "Ignite" modifier with respect to TV since IgniteTV (IPTV) is not available in Atlantic Canada yet. I know Rogers calls it Ignite Internet, but there is no reason to use the Ignite modifier as it will confuse a lot of people if you mention TV.
 

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Just looked up the Telus wireless home phone, if your province is set to anything in the west coast you can view it, but once you change it to ontario it says not available, oh well. bummer. also telus wireless home phone is not the same as voip. voip you need a separate internet connection which you pay for separately, telus is 3g/4g, and if u cancel your internet, the telus wireless still works cus for that price it includes its own backhawl, almost all voip providers do NOT, but ones that do are rogers cable home phone, rogers wireless home phone and rogers ignite home phone.
 

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once you change it to ontario it says not available
The Telus site thinks I'm in Toronto and the home phone service shows up. It also says shipping to anywhere in Canada. Telus mobile operates in Ontario so don't know why wireless home phone wouldn't be. Maybe it's not available in all of Ontario. Some area codes are excluded.

Can't say I care for the pricing or terms. It's a 2 year contract with cancellation fees for early termination. 911 fees are extra. Non-Telus customers pay $30+/mo. A cheap cellphone service may be a better option. There is also a long list of services that don't work.
Not compatible with services that require landline communication, including: home security systems (unless wireless enabled), medical alert system, fax machine, dial-up internet service, DSL internet service, POS system, and collect calls.
Note that Koodo offers the same service for $5/mo with a $65 upfront fee for the hub and SIM card. There doesn't appear to be any contract requirement. Koodo is owned by Telus.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I have a TELUS contract already and I’d need to be a Koodo customer to get that $5 pricing I’m pretty sure. Still not disappointed I signed up but it isn’ t for everybody and not everyone would like it, I’m out a lot of the time and mostly just use it as a backup option aside from my cell phone to call friends/family/long distance. I’ve been pretty content with Telus.

Edit: I just called Koodo to make sure and was informed that you do need to be a Koodo customer and have a plan to get that $5 pricing.
 

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also telus wireless home phone is not the same as voip
VoIP is a method of carrying phone calls over IP. While it's commonly used over the Internet, any IP connection can be used. For example, I have Rogers Home Phone, which uses it's own terminal, separate from any Internet service. However, it's still VoIP. Same with VoLTE. It's essentially VoIP over the cell network. Years ago, I used to work with devices that supported remote users on a PBX. The devices could be configured to use IP, sot they'd also be VoIP, though not the usual SIP/RTP as commonly used now.
 

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Weird, it shows available now and my province is set to Ontario. And yes I am aware Telus Mobility has an office in Ontario. I've actually been there to do work as a Vendor for them on several occasions and I have a doctor specialist in one of the Telus buildings on Consilium as well.

$30 dollars a month for non Telus customers, not bad but not that great. not worth it for me tho. i am happy with no bell landline for now, i survived for a year
 

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VoIP is a method of carrying phone calls over IP.
Chances are that POTS lines are converted to VoIP or a similar packet switching network once they hit the CO. The days of running a dedicated end-to-end line for each POTS connection are long gone. Bell was using packet switching networks at least back to the 1980s. They were available to residential customers then and provided a way to get cheaper long distance.
 

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Bell was using packet switching networks at least back to the 1980s. They were available to residential customers then and provided a way to get cheaper long distance.
The packet network back then was X.25. The consumer service Bell provided over it was called "Alex". It did not use IP and was not used to provide voice. X.25 was commonly used for services such as Alex, CompuServe and also Telenet, which was offered in Canada by CNCP/Unitel. I used to work on the computers and other equipment that supported Telenet.
 

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Then it's a good thing I never said it was TCP/IP or voice. It was X.25. I'm not familiar with Alex. The one I used personally had another name and it had lower long distance rates and supported dial-up modems. It turned out to be a wash because speeds were so much slower that it negated any per minute savings. One business I worked for in the late 1980s used X.25 modems for computer communications. It may have been Alex but I never heard that name used.
 

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^^^^
Alex, like Telenet, was a service that ran over X.25. Subscribers would use dial up modems to connect to the X.25 network. X.25 could also be used with ISDN or direct connection, if available.
 
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