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Hi all, I'm still using an old SA8300HD PVR that I bought years ago. It's still working perfectly fine, and I've upgraded the to a larger HDD with more than enough storage capacity. My question is, other than missing out on 4k resolution (I don't have a 4k TV yet) and a better channel guide (not a real concern for me), is there any other reason to upgrade?
 

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The 9865 will allow for up to 8 simultaneous recordings instead of 2.
The 8300HD does have "manual recording" capabilities, which the 9865 doesn't.
The picture quality from the 9865, even at 1080P on both, is a bit better than the 8300HD. I have both and can compare.
The 9865 has an HD user interface for the guide, menu items, etc.
The 9865 responds faster to button presses.
The 4K PVR uses the same firmware as the 9865, and has 4K capabilities...

See also:


Some of this discussion may be a bit moot because everyone will be migrated to IgniteTV in a few years. I definitely prefer the 9865 over the 8300, however, it's certainly not a necessity if you're happy with your 8300.
 

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^^^^
Yep, Rogers wants to move me to Ignite, as they will be killing the old system some time in the not too distant future.
 

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I see used 9865s listed for $50 to $150. A good used one for $100 or less might be a worthwhile upgrade. I wouldn't buy or rent from Rogers. Check to see that Rogers will activate it first.
 

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If the SA 8300 is the same SA 8300 hardware that Time Warner used here, by all means get rid of it. Is like using a computer from the year 2000 with an OS from 2020, expecting it to run as smooth as it did in 2000. Painfully sluggish...
 

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If the SA 8300 is the same SA 8300 hardware that Time Warner used here, by all means get rid of it. Is like using a computer from the year 2000 with an OS from 2020, expecting it to run as smooth as it did in 2000. Painfully sluggish...
Actually, with Rogers, the SA8300HD still uses SARA firmware and is therefore not very sluggish. It's a 2000 device running 2000 firmware, not 2020 firmware. ;) It's therefore roughly as fast now as it was initially, which was 2004 for Rogers. It's not as fast as a 9865 though and as mentioned above, one can be purchased relatively inexpensively used. Here's the list of caveats for purchasing used:

 

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they got so bad here, had to AT6 the thing...just awful...
 

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Here in Montreal with Videotron, there are channels that broadcast in MP4 format that the SA8300HD doesn't support. My SA8300HD doesn't receive dozens of channels that are available on my other receivers. Also, I can remotely program from the net my newer PVR to record a program but not the SA8300HD.Then there's whole-home PVR that isn't supported on the SA8300HD.

Needless to say, my SA8300HD is in a secondary bedroom and doesn't get a lot of use.
 

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^^^^
It used to be possible to program PVRs remotely (not sure about 8300), but Roger discontinued that due to some patent dispute in the U.S..
 

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Whole Home PVR is no longer available from Rogers. They won't activate it. It only works (somewhat badly) on legacy Whole Home installations.

The remote programming patent applies to cable systems only. It's owned by TiVo. Rogers could probably enabled it on Digital TV (along with other features and improvements) if they wanted to pay a license fee but Rogers would rather give the extra profits to their shareholders or waste it on failed in-house technology projects. Even though they have enabled remote programming with Ignite, Rogers appears to be going down a similar path with it. Poor equipment features and reliability have already negatively their TV business and, judging from the problems with Ignite, I doubt it will get better.
 

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^^^^
That's something that really bugs me about how patents are abused. Someone takes something that works generally, such as using a browser to control something and uses it in one specific application and claims it to be "original". How is taking something general and restricting it to one application original? Anyone who knows anything about networks and browsers knows that doing that over a cable network is irrelevant. The whole idea of protocol stacks is so that you can change the various layers transparently. For example, token ring and ARCnet used to be popular LAN technologies and the network protocols, such as IP or IPX didn't really care what they ran over. It's really amazing how lawyers can abuse reality.
 

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I agree. Part of the problem is that some companies swamp the US patent system with applications and hope to get a few bad ones through. Some of these are "patent trolls" whose entire business model is to create or buy patents and launch law suits against companies that appear to be infringing. Another issue is that patent office workers cannot keep up with the explosion of new technology. It's very difficult to tell when a patent in a new product has prior use or if it will be interpreted too broadly in another application. Some patents, especially for software, are too broad in scope and can diminish entire classes of products and prevent the formation of industry standards.

The US legal system doesn't help either. Most large patent suits in the US occur in one Texas legal district where a local judge frequently grants favourable rulings to patent trolls. Then it gets dragged out in appeals for years afterward. That can cost a company millions or billions in lost business or market share. The end result is that the affected company often settles out of court or redesigns their products rather than spend years in appeal courts. After TiVo won their patent law suit, most cable systems disabled remote programming in their PVRs. The big losers were millions of cable customers.
 
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