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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had OTA for years. Most of the time I didn't even realize I was using RG59. So sad. I upgraded it to RG6 and still get great signal. Once in a blue moon I lose signal only because the station is down for some reason. I just picked up a CM-3412 to boost my signal and was thinking of upgrading my coaxial to RG11 as 4K broadcasting will be coming in about 2 years. So my question is, is it worth upgrading to RG11 now? Will I notice a difference in signal between RG6 and RG11?

Thank you in advance and look forward to reading.

K.
 

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Retain?
Consider that your tuner is only able to lock onto signals that make an antenna resonate loudly enough over the noise in the radio spectrum around it, and if the noise isn’t low enough (or the signal isn’t high enough above the noise floor, whichever way you choose to look at it), you’ll not be able to discern a clear signal from it.
Cable just carries signal - it doesn’t hold it. If you’re talking about locking onto channels, that’s an antenna/tuner thing, assuming they’re capable of snatching from the air the signal you want, assuming enough of it is available at your location.
RG11 will not miraculously help extend the reach of your antenna; it might help the tuner do its job with more ease, but so will raising the antenna height 3-5-10-30 feet higher to try to catch more of the signal in the air overhead as it passes by...as will getting an antenna with higher average gain or more gain in the frequency range you’re looking to capture. Now, if you’re talking really long Cable runs of over 1000’ and RG11 has significantly lower resistance and capacitance than the same length of rg6, THAT’S why you’d make the change. Especially if an amplifier at the antenna end is impractical. But for most consumer home installs, a few ohms and mIllifarads in the cable won’t make a significant difference, ESPECIALLY if your electrical and signal grounds are solid/proper/correct, so that the resonant signals the antenna relays to the tuner are “loud enough” for it to lock onto and decode reliably.
Does that help?


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Agree, if your cable had to carry a decent amount of DC current, by powering electronics at the far end, AND the cable run was extremely long, RG11 would help. Another scenario it might help is if ya had a really long run, AND you didn't use an amplifier at the antenna.
But RG6 is available with Solid Copper Center Conductor and quad shield,
which helps to reduce the DC Resistance enough also, for almost any install.
And most people use a preamp to overcome their losses on the RF side of the house
with long coax runs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Morning, yes audioguy_on_ca that does help. Thank you. Run from antenna to amp is 7 feet. Amp to 1st TV is 6 feet and 2nd TV is about 50 feet. I guess in my stupid mindset that better is better. But you if chaps feel RG6 should be good enough, then I'll stick with it.

Thank you so much for your valued input.

Ken
 

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Better IS better. But you haven’t talked about “enough”

Can you shorten the distance from antenna to amplifier? It’s already quite short, but if you want to optimize your setup, that’s the way to do it.


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In that situation, RG11 would be a complete waste of money. RG11 may provide some advantages for very long cable lengths (hundreds of feet) or very high frequencies (well above OTA frequencies.) For most situations, a better antenna, a better preamp or a better receiver/tuner will provide more improvement that using RG11.
 

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Also requires special connectors and adapters.
 

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You can always run RG11 from the antenna down your drop amp and then run RG6 after that to all your TVs, that is the way I did my set-up simply becasue I had RG11 cable already on the roof from my previous satellite dish install.
 

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Pending on the quality of the cable (no name Chinese vs known US brand)
based on a standard 100' length at 600MHz (the highest TV frequency now)
RG59 6.2db
RG6 5db
RG11 3.2db
Meaning RG11 has half the loss as RG59. BUT, as stated, it's harder to work with (bending & 'fishing') due to it's thickness. It does use the same type of fittings ('F') but they are of course much larger and more expensive and will need a special 'compression' tool.. As another member also stated or suggested, it's best between the antenna and you indoor distribution system; distribution amp indoors instead of a preamp outdoors and splitters.
 

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Meaning RG11 has half the loss as RG59.
At 600MHz. What about lower, in the freq band in question for OTA? And that’s per 1000’ isn’t it? Not much of a factor over 20-30’ it sounds like this run will be.


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600MHz is the current top frequency for OTA. (Before 1983, 890MHz was the highest frequency). Always figure the highest frequency in use for cable loss.

In most cable loss charts 100' is the typical length used for comparison.

Yes, 30' isn't much. RG6 is what should be used. I use RG59 for short 'jumpers' due to it's flexibility (not as 'stiff') (y)
 
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