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Not with a preamp, assuming you installed it at the antenna, the splitter makes no difference at all in SNR. My system has an 8 way splitter, 13.2 dB insertion loss...
 

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Not with a preamp, assuming you installed it at the antenna, the splitter makes no difference at all in SNR.
A splitter that points signal to 2 TV's have around 3.5db of loss per port in signal strength. Not a clue what you are referencing. Before installing the preamp that signal loss was a make or break reception point.

A 2.1 db loss at RF 34 from the LTE filter seems quite large when the channel isn't the strongest. My preamp definitely has cleared up some problems, though.
 

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The point of the preamp is to make the downstream losses, regardless what they are irrelevant, simple as that.
Yes before you used a preamp, the splitter was likely causing you problems. But after you installed the preamp, at the antenna, the splitter is no longer a factor in your reception or lack thereof.
My guess is that u will have enough headroom there for rf34 to not be missing the 2 dB insertion loss of the filter between the antenna and the preamp, because it's "local"

You are trading off your quoted 2 dB at ch 34 for the rejection it offers in the stop band.
 

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Signal strength and SNR, signal to noise ratio, are two different things. With digital you can have low signal strength, but if the SNR is at a certain level your TV you will have a perfect picture and audio regardless of the splitter.
 

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Signal strength and SNR, signal to noise ratio, are two different things. With digital you can have low signal strength, but if the SNR is at a certain level your TV you will have a perfect picture and audio regardless of the splitter.
And you can also have a higher Signal Strength and low SNR like one low power station I'm getting. 59/60% but it's SNR is 16... half the time it's in and out. RF 34 was solid at 40% and 19/20 SNR mostly but once you get to these lower numbers, any little thing will cause you to lose reception. The goal is to have reception reliably. Both measurements are indeed, important.
 

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I agree both numbers are important. But in the digital world SNR wins out.
 

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"Both measurements are indeed, important."
I would agree, however, for different reasons. Is important to have a good handle on the overall
situation from top to bottom, across the entire spectrum.
The sad truth is that consumer equipment does a poor job of reporting the two quantities.
One of my TVs does a decent job, at least displays SNR dB, eg "quality", but no "strength" at all.
That is why I go thru such lengths to make sure in linux, the pc based devices I use can report both, when ever possible. By dabblin around with the drivers in the kernel.
Most other people could care less.
 

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Signal strenght was important in the analog days. Digital has changed our concept of reception. In the analog days you could watch a TV station until it faded away into the noise. Today the TV demodulator decides when to cut you off based on some algorithem. My argument was always that anolog had better reception range. Digital only cares about spectrum efficiency and delivery of perfect image and audio.
 

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My Tablo has no discernible numbers except for 5 bars (like a smartphone) for signal strength. It would be useful to get these numbers. My Sony TV has Signal Strength and SNR, not sure on how accurate it is.




I'm watching 3 stations from 75 miles away today, in the afternoon (one of them is the subject of the pic). I've never seen 'tropo' in the daytime, if that's what it is. There is no other reason why I should be getting these far away stations with my small setup.
 

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Well I get Buffalo stations 80 miles away consistenly. However, they are transmitting from 1800 foot mountain tops with 1000kw erp. Yet low power station serving the Buffalo markets 50 miles away I do not receive.
All I have is a CM 4221 about 35 ft on the roof pointed at the general Buffalo area.
Tropo and other anomolies can happen at any time of day especially in the summer months. Many mornings I get Rochester for about an hour or so and them its gone. Thats 100 miles away. Also often in the late evenings they re-appear.
Any kind of antenna testing this time of year is at the mercy of propogation due to unstable temp variations.
Good luck.
 

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Well I get Buffalo stations 80 miles away consistenly. However, they are transmitting from 1800 foot mountain tops with 1000kw erp. Yet low power station serving the Buffalo markets 50 miles away I do not receive.
All I have is a CM 4221 about 35 ft on the roof pointed at the general Buffalo area.
Tropo and other anomolies can happen at any time of day especially in the summer months. Many mornings I get Rochester for about an hour or so and them its gone. Thats 100 miles away. Also often in the late evenings they re-appear.
Any kind of antenna testing this time of year is at the mercy of propogation due to unstable temp variations.
Good luck.
Wow, if I had your setup instead of my knockoff antenna at 18ft, I might get something at 200 miles ;)

Too bad I don't have the cojones to climb my 30ft tower or spend the money on better equipment. I guess I'll just watch my locals which are 14-20 miles away. I do get some low power stations and one is Religious, the other is Black programming, Spanish language on Azteca station, Country Music videos, Shopping Channels, etc. Not much worth watching. There is a 'local' channel on VHF 3 that few can get, even if you live in Detroit. Low power and few have the 6 foot long VHF elements anymore.

But hey, "CHiPs", "Knight Rider", "Hunter" and all those old shows are here to watch, in glorious 480i.
 

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Anyone put dielectric grease on any of their antenna connections outside or is it not necessary? I have some weather boots but the LTE filter and balun connections obviously, have no boot.

Anyone know where to get a 5ft x 1.25" antenna mast cheaply? They are asking ridiculous money for this stuff on Amazon.
 

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Try a fence post from Home Depot. If I recall correctly, a top rail is close to 1.25" and about 12 feet long. I used one with a chimney mount for awhile.
 

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Sure looks like it. It's a bit lighter but it should work fine with a smaller UHV antenna. Don't think I would trust it with a big VHF monster.
 

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Fence post from home depot is what I use as a mast. They are galvanized and very solid.
I have used dilectric grease in outdoor connectors for years with OTA, satellite and my amateur radio connectors.. Never had any moisture issues..
 

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Sure it will. Cut off the 2.5 feet! LOL
 

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Cutting off 2.5' won't affect the structural integrity. It may rust a little at the cut. Provided it fits, the 1.5" pole should be much stronger.
 
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