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we are changing one of our basement rooms into a home theatre. we would like to sound proof this room a bit so that other people in adjescent rooms have minimal inconvinience. but at the same time we are not looking to spend a lot on sound proofing alone.

i searched on the internet and came across a product called quietrock. anyone used it? is it cost-effective? available in canada?

any help will be much appreciated.
 

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If you type "soundproofing" (one word) into the site's search engine, there are several threads on the subject - you may wish to check them out.
 

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thanks a lot - that information was very helpful.

i am in Vancouver - and I am not too much of a handy man to be able to do this myself. So I want to ask - do you guys know of any good contractor in Vancouver area who can do this for me for a reasonable price?
 

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This if my first post. I guess I've never really had anything to say. This has been one of the most informative forums I've come across. I like the fact that you can find Canadian sources for products and services. kudos to all who contribute.

I've been doing a fair bit of reading on soundproofing. I've read through the post here and on AVS as well as a variety of other sites. There is so many varying opinions on what will work and what will not.

heyman said:
i searched on the internet and came across a product called quietrock. anyone used it? is it cost-effective? available in canada?

any help will be much appreciated.
http://www.dryco.ca/products/product.htm these guys carry Quietrock only out west. I contacted the Ontario branches and they don't carry it.

I found Sound Divide in the Toronto area at (416) 208-3040 apparently they are the sole distributor in Ont. They carry 2 thickness QuietRock QR-530 at 5/8" 83lbs per 4x8 sheet and QuietRock QR-545 which is THX certified at 1"3/8" thick 180lbs per sheet. Apparently the QR 545 is what AMC theatres use. It all sounded good until I got the price. QuietRock QR-530 is $135 per sheet and the QuietRock QR-545 is $175 per sheet and they will recommend have it installed for $350 (for 2 guys) per day. You cannot cut this stuff without a saw.
I am figuring that for my ceiling 14'x24' it would probably run me over $3000. Too much for this basement reno for a house I will not be in long term. On my next house I may consider it.

I think I going to lean towards Sonopan, Roxul and possibly resilient channel.
I figure I will have to live with muffled sound rather than sound proof.

Anyone have ideas on how they placed their subs. Did you enclose them? use spikes or cones etc etc. would I be better off leaving it on concrete floor or a subfloor. The bass is what worries me the most.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Shell Busey was talking about this soundprooof drywall product on CKNW this week.

If you are an early riser, give him a call on his Saturday (5AM!) show on CKNW. It seems pricey but he said that it really works well.

As far as the sub goes, the best thing you can do is experiment and see what works best. Maybe a sound meter could be useful here???
 

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heyman said:
we are changing one of our basement rooms into a home theatre. we would like to sound proof this room a bit so that other people in adjescent rooms have minimal inconvinience. but at the same time we are not looking to spend a lot on sound proofing alone.

i searched on the internet and came across a product called quietrock. anyone used it? is it cost-effective? available in canada?

any help will be much appreciated.
I am not an expert by any means but I just renovated our basement and installed a sound-proof room for a "simple" music studio. I can give you some of what I learned and my experience

I did most of the work myself but got advice and many of materials from a great company called Wilrep Ltd. 1-888-625-8944 www.wilrep.com. Small company in Toronto but they knew their stuff and were prepared to work with a little guy like me on what was a large project for me but relatively small for them. They provided some key sound proofing products and advised me of what I could just use from Home Depot, etc. Don Wilkenson was the guy who helped my and I am most appreciative of his willingness to explain things and customize a plan for my needs.

Basically you have to decide how sound proof you want the room to be. The greater the sound reduction, the higher the price. You will find it is not a striaght line $ to results thing. If you go too cheap you will get virtually no benefit, mid-range effort and cost will yield very good results (what I call "bearable and ignorable" - in our case, our oldest son can be rehearsing his rock band (with amps) in the studio and we will barely be able to hear it with the TV on at moderate volume in the family room 20 ft away. To go significantly quieter will likely cost 2-3 times more than the moderate.

Think of sound proofing a room like an aquarium with air. An aquarium that is 99% water-tight, will still leak water. Same concept with sound in a room.

Most sound escapes a room via air ducts and door thresholds. Try some cheap weather stripping around any door ways into the room to help seal the doors a bit better and stop sound leaking out that way.

If you have access to your air ducts, you should be able to find some inexpensive accoustic foam that you can stuff into your duct about 1 foot (get thin stuff so that you can leave an opening down the centre for air circulation). A lot of sound bounces from room to room via your duct work. Putting a foot or two of foam at the sound treated room end helps absorb the sound rather than having it bounce further up the duct.

With respect to walls, ceilings and floor, general rule is solid mass objects (5/8ths drywall, contrete, etc will stop high frequency sounds, while "air" and soft foamy substances are best for reducing low frequency or bass effects.

Ironically, what works for one, often makes the other worst - bass travels best through solid walls and especially concrete floors (often to bounce up in the wierdest places elsewhere in your house!), - high frequency will go far through thin air.

The best sound proofing is done in a layered fashion. Usually solid 5/8ths drywall type on outside (solid to cut down the highs) ) often on a floating frame (to help reduce ability of bass to travel through wall) rather than screwed directly to studs, behind it will be one or two layers of sound proof insulation (again to help muffle bass , then drywall another high frequency barrier.

To be really effective you should also treat the ceiling in a similar fashion. As for the floor, if concrete, you should consider an accoustic subfloor (special tiles that have sound absorbtion foam under neath to inhibit bass getting into the floor concrete.

To do all the above on a 16' x 16 room will likely cost about $6,000 if you do much of labour yourself. Obviously, you can reduce cost by cherry picking what makes sense based on what you are trying to accomplish.

There are a number of websites that do discuss options, just make sure you determine whether they are independent or primarily there to promote one product over another. These may still be good but recognize that they are likely to flog a particular solution and product rather than provide fully open comparative advice.

Hope this helps a bit.:p
 

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I recently finished my TV room and was concerned about "soundproofing" however i had no interest in spending 5-6K on soundproofing i did use safe n sound in the ceiling and it did help another fix i will make is solid core doors i think these will help.
 

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GORD HARRIS said:
I recently finished my TV room and was concerned about "soundproofing" however i had no interest in spending 5-6K on soundproofing i did use safe n sound in the ceiling and it did help another fix i will make is solid core doors i think these will help.

I forgot about mentioning the solid core doors. Gord is correct, they do make a sizeable difference right off the bat
 

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hdtvman said:
Shell Busey was talking about this soundprooof drywall product on CKNW this week.

If you are an early riser, give him a call on his Saturday (5AM!) show on CKNW. It seems pricey but he said that it really works well.
I don't thing the 5am show is call-in. You can always listen to it at CKNW's audio vault.

Or you can go to Shell's HouseSmartCenter and search for "soundproofing". There's several FAQs on the topic.
 

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anybody know where in the GTA I can get 5/8" QuietRock installed in my basement. I Just want to make a simple HT room but I have zero skills in doing so.

The room area will be approx 20' x 10'. Preferably with 5/8" QuietRock all around, fill up the ceiling area with Owens Corning sound absorber and possibly the 3/8" QuietRock. Plus a solid door.

Anybody can help me by giving me referral or such? THe phone number mentioned by wingzero doesn't work.
 

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David,

You may find that 2 layers of Drywall (5/8" if u have the room) plus green glue may be cheaper than the OC Quietrock.... (at least Material wise)... I think that a 4x8 sheet of QR was in the $100+ range.

2 sheets of drywall should be about $30
1.5 -2 tubes of GG is $25-34

Total cost for 32sq ft = $55-64

Peter
 

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Sound proofing... no right answer!

If your starting from studs/framing, then the typical route is Roxul Safe'N'Sound for insulation but even fiberglass batt insulation will work. All cavities must be filled, no air spaces. Next up is RSIC clips/resilient channel typically, second best would be hat channel, the cheapest would be furring strips. If your going straight on studs, then integrity gasket (I use Owens Corning sill gasket ripped into 2by strips) on the stud surfaces helps with isolation. Next is drywall, the more mass the better but also the more expensive. Typical would be double drywall with Green Glue, but you could go with single 5/8" or 1/2" drywall only. If sound transmission is a problem, add another layer of drywall (with GG) at a later date. Solid core door and door gasket/sweep. For duct work, there is stick-on sound isolation material (I use stuff for reducing road noise in cars; aluminum backed closed cell foam) and of course all drywall joints have accoustic sealed. Electrical boxes can be buttered with accoustical sealant (or accoustical putty sheets).

The above will result in a room with a significantly lower STC. The idea is to get the biggest bang for the buck. All of the above materials are fairly basic price wise (not over inflated like the QuietRoc) but don't expect to do a room for next to nothing. Material is material, labour is labour. Material cost depends on what "your" requirements/desires/goals are; don't have much in those terms and you can save on materials. Labour cost can be saved via DIY but you have to assume the time/risk; getting a contractor will jack the price obviously.

Cheers,
Kaoru
 

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If your starting from studs/framing, then the typical route is Roxul Safe'N'Sound for insulation but even fiberglass batt insulation will work. All cavities must be filled, no air spaces. Next up is RSIC clips/resilient channel typically,

Cheers,
Kaoru
Kaoru,

Good post. A couple points

- staggered stud walls may help to decouple the wall and can be an alternative to the RSIC clip/hat channel, or Isomax clip. It also might be the cheapest /bang for buck option. Figure on less than $2 / linear foot of wall space.

- each joist cavity (ceiling) , or stud cavity in wall should be treated. I don't believe ceiling joists need to be filled to full thickness, air spaces can be left in the ceiling. The RSIC / Isomax clips leave an intentional air space in HT construction.

- Air can be important in reducing noice (airlock / communicating door) entrance into a HT.
 

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I'm picking up some QuietRock 510 half inch board. $60 per sheet. It's expensive, but I'm hoping it's worth it for my TV room.
 

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I can't find Green Glue anywhere. Does anyone know where I may find it in my area? Cost?

I am just starting to put up the QuietRock board. It appears to be 2 qaurter inch sheets of drywall glued together with a Green Glue- like adhesive. It is hard to score with a knife.

How does the LePage acousti-seal non-drying glue (available at Home Depot) compare to the Green Glue?
 

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Home theatre insulation

For all those looking for special insulation for home theatres, I distribute owens corning soundproofing for theatres

You also have the option of using "duct liner' which is the insulation they use inside AC ducts and heating systems to absorb noise. This stuff has a black facing, which also absorbs light, Glue the stuff up and bobs your uncle.
 

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Should any treatment be done to the basement ceiling in terms of making the subfloor of the main floor thicker? There's hardwood already on the main floor, but should I screw in either drywall or plywood from the basement between the joists to make the floor thicker? I assume the more mass I put up, the better?
 

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More mass is better. Adding mass directly to the underside of the subfloor also allows you to damp that floor, and that's a great thing as well.
 
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