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Discussion Starter #81
the internet would work but the 802.1p priority value has to be set on any packets going to the TV VLAN, without that the TV part won't work. the switch would have to set it, not many can.
 

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Your quite right File. Many switches can read tags but they do not actually physically apply tags to the data packets. Instead they have an internal schema which they apply to the vlans or ports (prioritize data) physically vice inserting tags. What they do is map the 802.1p standard settings to the switch settings. They show the user what the switch setting equates to (mapped to) the standard so that the user can choose which device setting to select and thus apply the equivalent priority. One switch I have found is the Netgear GS108Tv2. If you read the User Guide in the DiffServ section, it actually talks about inserting tags. In the rest of the less complex settings they do the mapping trick thing.
http://www.downloads.netgear.com/files/GS108T_GS110TP_SWA_5Nov10.pdf starting on pg 132. More involved than just setting levels to vlans or ports as one has to set up classes, policies and define services for an interface. But in the end one can do what is required, at least according to the manual.

"Mark CoS. Enter the specified Class of Service queue number to mark all packets for the associated traffic stream with the specified class of service value in the priority field of the 802.1p header. If the packet does not already contain this header, one is inserted. The CoS value is an integer from 0–7."
 

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It's important to note that 802.1p is an extension of the VLAN standard so dot1p port priority values set by a managed switch will only be carried across an 802.1Q VLAN trunk. This actually works quite well for a FibreOP install. Create a dot1q trunk from the router to a managed switch and define VLAN 34 (IPTV) and VLAN 36 (data) on the trunk. On the switch, put some ports in VLAN 36 for data and one port in VLAN 34 for the STB and define the CoS/802.1p priority value for the STB port. The priority tag for IPTV VLAN 34 traffic is carried across the trunk to the router and up to Aliant.
 

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Couple of comments, what is VLAN 36 used for?? My understanding is that VLAN 35 is internet and VLAN 34 is IPTV. If the managed switch I find can actually tag data packets going out of the switch on VLAN 34, then the router should not have anything else to do except continue the VLAN 34 routing out to the internet to the ISP. In other words no QoS settings are required on the router.

On a different sidebar, I do note my router has DiffServ capabilities and it uses something called ToS and DSCP marking to modify data packets. I am investigating if that can be used for the 802.1p tagging, that File has pointed out needs to be done (and for which many switches are unable to do). If this is the case then perhaps it can all be done without the specific managed switch in question. Would only need an unmanaged switch to move the data to a single port on the router and then assign all traffic going out the router (via the WAN port) on vlan 34 with the appropriate 802.1p tag of 4 (if its possible).
 

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Discussion Starter #85
VLAN 36 is for management. Each Actiontec is reachable by Bell Aliant on it for config/firmware upgrade reasons. Or it might be VLAN 33... one of them. It doesn't matter for the Asus so that was pushed to long term mental storage.
 

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Couple of comments, what is VLAN 36 used for?? My understanding is that VLAN 35 is internet and VLAN 34 is IPTV. If the managed switch I find can actually tag data packets going out of the switch on VLAN 34, then the router should not have anything else to do except continue the VLAN 34 routing out to the internet to the ISP. In other words no QoS settings are required on the router.

On a different sidebar, I do note my router has DiffServ capabilities and it uses something called ToS and DSCP marking to modify data packets. I am investigating if that can be used for the 802.1p tagging, that File has pointed out needs to be done (and for which many switches are unable to do). If this is the case then perhaps it can all be done without the specific managed switch in question. Would only need an unmanaged switch to move the data to a single port on the router and then assign all traffic going out the router (via the WAN port) on vlan 34 with the appropriate 802.1p tag of 4 (if its possible).
Correct, VLAN 35 is the WAN and VLAN 34 is IPTV. If you replace the Actiontec then the internal LAN data VLAN number doesn't really matter. I'm currently using three different data VLAN's (36, 37 and 38).

DiffServ is class-based QoS used in routers for setting the DSCP field value in the IP header. ToS was used before DSCP. It's a way of marking traffic at layer 3 so the value is carried within the IP packet. CoS/802.1p is used to mark traffic at layer 2 in a switch and is only carried across links within a VLAN tagged frame. You can configure some routers and managed switches to map CoS-to-DSCP and DSCP-to-CoS, and when both values are set you can define which value to trust. AFAIK, the Aliant FibreOP CO is configured to trust CoS from your router. I'm pretty sure they would ignore DSCP so you would need to set the CoS/802.1p value or configure your router to mark the DSCP value and map DSCP-to-CoS.
 

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We recently had fiberop installed (internet only). Like many others, the actiontec just wasn't cuttin it for me. I decided to replace it with a custom router, using pfSense.

So my current setup is ONT -> pfSense box -> gigabit switch

The pfSense box has two NICs. (em0 and em1)

While installing pfSense, I assigned VLAN 35 with the WAN interface. (em0)

Before I took the actiontec out of the way, I wrote down the WAN MAC address and released the current IP address. I replaced the actiontec with my new pfsense box. I logged on to the web configuration and noticed that my WAN interface had obtained an IP address!

I am confused because I was under the impression that I would have to spoof the MAC address of the WAN interface (on the pfSense box) with the one from the actiontec.

No spoofing was required for me to obtain an IP address.

So how does Bell Aliant's DHCP server know which client I am? I thought customers were identified by the WAN MAC address of the actiontec router.
 

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It is handled by the SLID on your ONT. If they ever needed to know where a problem is coming from, they can match the IP to the proper slot on the GPON equipment, which would trace back to a specific home.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
To go further down the road... it used to be that you had to spoof your MAC address but Bell Aliant upgraded/changed their DHCP server so it is no longer required.
 

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HI File, that is good news, so we no longer have to clone the mac address of the Actiontech.
Thanks.

On another note, I saw mention and saw it myself for the first time (didnt know it was coming out) the Asus N65U. The mentioin was the possiblility of your supporting that particular router. I am assuming support is predicated upon the ability to vlan tag and 802.1- tag as per the older realtik switch in the N56U. Also the performance of the NAT engine is key. After reviewing some specs it certainly appears that the N65U has a nat engine so hopefully that part should suffice. The switch thankfully is a Realtek and the same series number, however is not exactly the same ending in RB vice M so it should be good to go so to speak - If I had to guess they are doing this (putting out this n65U especially for Bell fiber customers LOL. After reading through the sheet, not being technically astute it does seem that this switch will do all you want ie programmable to do the things required and then some.
http://www.realtek.com.tw/products/productsView.aspx?Langid=1&PNid=18&PFid=15&Level=5&Conn=4&ProdID=300

Can you elaborate??
 

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Discussion Starter #91
It's pretty much the same as the RT-N56U, just runs hotter and a few other tweaks (more flash).
 

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need info

I have read all of the post but no one mentions anything about hooking it up to an asa5505.
I have TV (cat5), phone and internet. I am currently using the rt-n56u instead of the actiontec but I might be looking at if I can connect it directly to the ONT if that will work.
 

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Just figured I'd share this here, as this thread covers a lot about the underlying network architecture.

Today, while troubleshooting some speed issues, I bit the bullet(despite my fears that it may break my custom setup), and factory reset my R1000H in order to get the 33.120L.05 firmware. Once it downloaded and upgraded, I took a bit of time to play around in the new system, and reconfigure it.

I have found that the new firmware appears to be IPv6 capable, deployment timeline is another story. I did a quick look in the peering DB( http://www.peeringdb.com/view.php?asn=855 ) and it looks like BellAliant has IPv6 peering setup.

I finally got around to re-configuring the system for my setup, and PPPoE is still an option on the settings(presumable for VDSL customers not yet migrated to fiber), changed that, saved changes, rebooted R1000H, TV came back(still assigning 192.168.2.x IP) I looked at the routing table, and the IPs of my STBs is being routed to the 10.x network, as mentioned in the firmware thread is being handled by “Dual Routed IP Edge” aka “DRIPE”(thanks @macmillan). Internet no longer functioned through the R1000H. Went back to my pfSense box, rebooted, got an external IP and everything came back online.

I have included below, an in depth description of my home setup. The key parts are ONT, DGS-1005G, and R1000H. pfSense is my gateway, therefore can be replaced by whatever solution you want, as long as it is capable of 802.1q VLAN tagging. If you are an internet only customer, the DGS-1005G can be replaced by your gateway, connecting directly to eth0(LAN1 Port) on the ONT. The opt0 interface on my pfSense box is connected back to the R1000H strictly so I can view the status pages, without needing to switch networks. Remember that MAC spoofing is no longer required!

ONT:
FXS Port connects to FXO Port on asterisk
eth0 connects to DGS-1005G:eth0

DGS-1005G:
eth0 connects to ONT:eth0
eth2 connects to R1000H:wan0
eth4 connects to pfSense:wan0

R1000H:
wan0 connects to DGS-1005G:eth2
eth0 connects to VIP2262:eth0
eth4 connects to pfSense:eek:pt0
HPNA connects to 2x VIP2202

pfSense:
wan0 connects to DGS-1005G:eth4 VLAN 35
opt0 connects to R1000H:eth4
lan0 connects to WS-C5505:eth0

WS-C5505:
eth0 connects to pfSense:lan0
eth1 connects to fileserv:lan0
eth2 connects to asterisk:eth0
eth3 connects to desktop:eth0
eth4 connects to AIR-AP1130AG:eth0
 

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Ok, so I've been playing around some more, and found some interesting things. I connected to the R1000H and took a look at the routing architecture, which is interesting to say the least.

Routing Table
Destination Netmask Gateway
10.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 0.0.0.0
192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 0.0.0.0
10.31.64.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.2
172.23.64.0 255.255.252.0 192.168.2.2
172.31.64.0 255.255.248.0 192.168.2.2
10.228.0.0 255.255.192.0 0.0.0.0
10.237.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.228.0.1

10.0.0.0/24 appears to just be remnants from the older IPTV setup. Which coincides with the other IPTV rules.

192.168.2.0/24 is for local traffic.

10.31.64.0/24, 172.23.64.0/22 and 172.31.64.0/21 are static routes that I entered.

10.228.0.0/18 looks to be IPTV related, just providing routing to the IPTV gateway.

10.237.0.0/16 appears to route traffic to the IPTV network, a packet capture showed trafficgoing out to numerous hosts in this subnet. Specifically hosts from 10.237.1.196 to 10.237.1.210. I am able to ping 10.228.0.1 successfully, however, anything beyond that returns a destination host unreachable. I am assuming that this is normal behaviour for non STB devices.

There is no default route, as the internet connection is disabled as per my above post.

On the IPTV network, there seems to be a lot of traffic with 3 common destination ports, 80 which is HTTP, 43962 which is unassigned, and 47806 which is Asynchronous Layered Coding(ALC) used for content distribution, with multicast for scalability. Common multicast hosts seen are: 239.192.0.4, 239.42.137.114, 239.42.137.119, 239.42.137.15, and 239.42.151.24. Many more were seen on a quick packet capture, I would assume though, that each channel has it's own multicast address.

Enough with the R1000H, we all know it sucks. The only reason I have it around, is the need for the HPNA.

I also have a line running from my pfSense box, back to the R1000H, and the appropriate routing rules now in place(pfSense put up a big stink creating the rules pointing to a gateway not on the subnet), to allow my network to communicate with it, I am also able to ping the STBs, and the IPTV gateway 10.228.0.1 from my internal network 172.23.64.0/22. In the near future, I plan on moving one of my STBs from the R1000H to the internal network, and see if it works.

The have found that if I create VLAN 34 and tag it as priority 4 on the interface back to the ONT, I see nothing(not surprised though). The funny part though, if I create VLAN 33(which is the management VLAN) on the ONT side, DHCP gives the interface an IP from the R1000H. It is able to ping both the R1000H 192.168.2.1, and all 3 STBs.

I will be doing some more playing in the near future.
 

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Actiontec in bridge mode

Hi all, I realize this thread is largely about eliminating the actiontec from your setup entirely, however I have been using mine in bridge mode successfully for some time now. Currently we have only Internet service, but we're considering getting TV service with a promotion. My question is, will fibreop TV work with the actiontec in bridge mode, or will I have to return it to the poorly functioning router mode? I've searched extensively and can't find the answer to this specific question.

Any information will be appreciated.

Vic
 

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Thanks for your quick response! This is great news.
 

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Short answer: Yes, it will continue to work.
Tech was out and installed the FibreOp TV box. We weren't able to get any sort of connection on it with the router in Transparent Bridge mode (tried network ports as well as HPNA port) - had to revert to normal mode to get TV working. Do you have any additional information on how to go about enabling this setup? I consider myself quite technically adept, so feel free to go heavy on the details. Thanks.
 

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I just got MTS fibre internet here in Manitoba, no phone or TV service. They gave me an ONT and a Pace 5168N router. I would like to replace the Pace router with my own router. If I clone the mac of the Pace onto my own, it still does not get an IP address. I am trying to sniff the traffic between the ONT and the Pace router on my managed switch to find out if there are any vlans or priority being used, but the Pace does not get an IP address when connected to the managed switch. I don't have a plain hub. Any other suggestions to sniff the traffic?
 
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