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of course the CRTC doesnt regulate internet content but id bet they would do so so one day we may have a canadianised internet like in china and that while it's mostly in place shouldnt be
I'm sure they want to regulate the internet but the moment they do the world will start to notice what's going on in Canada with our media. Television is one thing, but like with China and North Korea, once they start messing with the net people start being concerned.
 

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I'm not sure what this Hulu,Torence are or from other internet route, but my point was like HankMoody said its channels that we can't get here that the programing is from. There a good 20+ channels that have programing not picked up by Canadian Nets. To bad because some of the programs are quite good. Now grant you I'm not sure if some of these shows are available via the internet or by getting them by getting a US IP address that I don't know, but I know the Canadian Neyts have a certain % of Canadian shows(not sure how much that is? :confused: )but what ever it is the rst is mainly US shows.

I'm not sure of what their budgets are to buy US shows or how this proocess is done? :confused: Bidding war? or just going out and buying them, but with all the channels owners have CTVGlobemedia, Canwest/Shaw,Rogers,etc. how can they tell me there no room on their Speacialty channels?

Do we really need to se "What Ever Happen To" on 3 or 4 different channels?Instead of showing the dsame show on 3 or 4 channelsa leave it on one and buy 3 other progams(US) not from thre taditional US Nets, but from F/X,TNT,etc and show them on those channels.

Now grant you this whole thing doesn't really effect me as I have Dish, its just I feel sorry for those on the forum or other Canadians that are missing out on some great shows.
 

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Shows do not get picked up due to cost. Canada's protectionist laws lets broadcasters get away with recycling mediocre programming indefinitely. It's about time the Canadian government recognizes that the current system is not working and starts dismantling some of the laws that are causing the problem. It's not going to happen soon though. There are too many vested interests at stake.

Restricted access to sites like Hulu is due to copyright law. That is not going to change. This is also tied to laws that protect Canadian broadcasters since they own the Canadian rights to many shows and must authorize streaming of the content. Many US copyright holders will not allow streaming to Canada because they want to sell the programming to Canadian networks. For now, there are ways around this but it's US companies that are restricting internet access, not Canadian broadcasters.
 

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Walter Dnes:
One problem is that Canada, with 1/10th the US population, can't support the same number of commercial TV networks. For English language commercial national TV networks, we basically have CTV and Global and CITY and that's about it.
Australia has approximately the same number of people as English Canada. They have a flourishing TV industry, several networks, including a national TV network that is commercial free (ABC). Our problem is that because of our proximity to the US, our national identity is fuzzy at best and American media seems to meet our cultural needs.
Content regulation in Canada has worked about as well as the war on drugs.
 

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There's no justification for the present Canadian broadcasting regieme from a consumer or a normal market perspective. The regulations like simsub are in place to protect a small group of companies and employees from competition, not just from the USA but the burgeoning programming sectors in other countries.

I should be able to pay Shaw or some other aggregator a monthly or pay per view fee to access anything Shaw or some other aggregator is willing to offer - full BBC, real HBO, ESPN, F/X etc. Let the market work and we'll see what the Canadian population can support.

Instead, we have to wait for a combination of CRTC commissioners and Canadian broadcast executives to decide what we can choose from - both of whom have a huge bias in reducing external competition (i.e. consumer choice).

The Internet makes a mockery of the present regulatory structure. There is no longer any role for government in determining media content options for consumers or for gatekeeping who consumers can buy transmitted video content from, beyond upholding the existing libel, slander, obscenity and sedition laws, along with maintaining technical standards.
 
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