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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed this problem a month or two ago and thought maybe it was temporary and would go away. However, it hasn't and I'm sick of it so I wanted to ask if anyone else has this issue.

Some channels, specifically AMC and HBO are really snowy, however it only seems to happen when the show actually starts. The AMC show introduction or ads looks fine but then The Walking Dead starts and all the blacks get really snowy. Maybe everything is snowy and it only really shows on the blacks but it's pretty irritating.

I'll try to post a picture soon of the issue but it's very noticeable. I only seem to have this issue on a couple HD channels and that's it so it can't be a connection issue on my end.

Anyone else notice this problem?

I have a Pace box with an external PVR HD (although I noticed the issue on my motorola box prior to switching to Pace). I usually watch my shows recorded and not live. And I'm in Alberta.

I really notice it in The Walking Dead and Mad Men (when season 4 was running). I've noticed it on HBO shows too. Come to think of it, I noticed it on Dexter too, which runs on Movie Central HD.
 

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In the case of the Walking Dead, it is almost certainly film grain. I believe it is filmed on a lower budget and uses 16mm film. American viewers are irritated with the video quality as well.
 

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In the case of the Walking Dead, it is almost certainly film grain. I believe it is filmed on a lower budget and uses 16mm film. American viewers are irritated with the video quality as well.
Walking Dead isn't filmed on a low budget; they chose to film it that way. They almost wanted to keep it like to book and do it all in B+W.

Cinematographer, David Boyd in an interview said "16mm is the perfect choice. Regardless if we did it in HD or 35mm film, we'd add grain in the end to make it have this look. It calls up the language of what we're used to seeing in a horror film. George Romero's stuff was all grainy. It's like looking at a documentary, and you instantly get into the 16mm documentary world. And if you take those same cameras and put them into The Walking Dead, it begins to be a believable, real experience. We were looking at a day exterior the other day, and it actually becomes scary -- the moment when you realize it's possible to do something this frightful in broad daylight."
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's definitely not film grain for cinematography purposes. It's really annoying snowy blacks.

Anyway, sounds like I'm alone on this issue. I'll do some testing to try to figure out the issue.
 
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