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Discussion Starter #1
My friends new home is 4 telephone poles, well actually he has underground pipe from the 3rd pole to his home, with room for cable to be pulled easily.
Shaw wants $3500 to run the drop to his home? Is there any second opinion, option? I know satellite TV? but his internet choice is only
shaw for high speed. Can shaw charge whatever they want? or are there
some guidelines? Publice service commission rules?
thanks
 

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A couple of my own thoughts on this from the 20,000 foot view....

3 poles length can be anywhere from 100 feet to 200.
Lets say it is 150 average.

You have now 450' of cable just from the beginning of the plant. This is in all probability not near any active electronics because it is near the end. So add in a line amplifier.

Add in 20 feet from the top of the pole to the ground level. Add in maybe another 200 feet to get to the end of the "drop". We're ESTIMATING at what: 650'-700' maybe even more.

Add in UGuard at the pole.

It would require the cable to be lashed to the strand.

Estimate that manpower/equipment would be about 1/2 that total cost. Pole rentage from the owner will have to be adjusted by extending to more poles. Probably there will be administrative costs associated with getting municipality approvals for plant extension.

600-700 feet of cable will require large gauge cable, not your typical RG11. Well, you could use it but the slope will kill your upper channels or cause such an imbalance that a second high quality amplifier will have to be used at the prem. Not talking Radio shack quality here either.

Consider the risks for Shaw. You say there is room in the conduit- but how do YOU know? How would Shaw know the condition of the conduit underground? I would surmise given the requirements, that at minimum a .625 cable is needed. Then they have to take the risk of pulling in an occupied duct and damaging the other infrastructure. That is even if it is legal. What if it is a power duct? Probably the safest way is to plow in their own and then pull it through.

I'd say the costs are about inline with what one should expect to pay for what you are receiving. I seriously doubt you're paying the full shot.

In all likelihood there would be provisions for cost recovery built in to the CRTC agreements. Can't run the biz like a crown corp, or it'll be in the same financial mess as all them, now.

Just my 3 cents worth...
 

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Are they within city limits? I'm not 100% sure, but I thought that there was some CRTC rule that made it manditory for the ISP/cableco to provide a line to the house free of charge for a residential customer as long as they were in the city. I know we charge for businesses, but for new lines for residential addresses we never have.
 

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if you can get satellite tv, maybe one of those internet usb sticks might work, i know telus bell and sasktel offer them. im not sure if its unlimited or you pay by the gigabyte. something to look into maybe.
 

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I would tell your friend that this is part of the cost of deciding to build new rather than buying an existing home. New homes are nice because they are new but there are WAY too many fees for everything in and out, and I would tack this $3500 to a cost to owning a new home.

I know it sucks, I know you don't want to pay it, but at the same time... its a one time fee and if you are going to live in the home for 20 years that is only $175 per year.

I would complain too if I had to pay it don't get me wrong - I like to save money but when you are spending 300k already what's another 3500? What would be the post if shaw just flat out said.. NO we won't run the cable? At least they are offering you service. Many people would love to have cable in their area...

Just my thoughts
Shawguy
 

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My parents live in East St Paul, MB just several hundred meters outside the City of Winnipeg municipal limit. In the 1980s my parents and our two neighbours were interested in getting Shaw installed but we deemed it to expensive. Then sometime in the late 90s we responded to a Shaw Internet offer for free install. When the tech arrived he was "Shocked, Apauled and Flabergausted" of the job he had infront of him that he realized that he was not equipt to run a couple hundred additional metres of aerial cable between the street and our house. Needless to say an additional truck roll was needed and we got a free install.
 

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I know Shaw will not charge for the first 250-300 feet of a drop into a customers home. (It's just part of the cost to get the cable to the customer). After that "heavy drop" is usually required so that the signal does not degrade and affect service quality. Heavy drop is thicker gauge cable that costs more than the average 5 cents per foot that the regular RG6 costs. In addition to having the cost of the cable and the labor to put it in there is the cost to install the equipment at the street to feed your home as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A little more info

I thought I was going to get replies stating the public utility commission requires them to hook up a new residential customer etc., seems like
everyone works for shaw that is replying? lol!

Well there is a Shaw cable amp at the highway with taps on the output,
so no need for shaw to instal a new amp as someone suggested.

The cable distance is about 600 ft., and 3 poles, to the customers underground 2" conduit that the telephone ran their drop into, by the way
the phone company charged nothing for this!

The first shaw person to show up at the house said it would cost about
$350 to $500, then phoned back and said no it was $3500?

How did it become 10 times more expensive? Is this the contract
installers price? There has to be some precedent, this is robbery.

I told the friend to try the CRTC and the PUC and maybe even his MLA.
The first price under $500 given by the contract installer on site who saw
the installation requirements is acceptable, how did it jump 10X?
 

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Are all of the poles on customer property? If they are on the road up to the dip pole, there would be access fees associated with placing cable - those poles would belong to the telephone and or power company.

There are also rules regarding how many cables can be placed on a pole line. If the pole line is deemed full by the telephone or power company, there would be "make ready" involved.. new strand, maybe new pole anchoring. Make ready can be quite costly.

To get the answer you need, request Shaw provide you with a written quote breaking down the associated costs.
 

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Well, there is not sufficient information to draw any firm conclusions from this thread alone. The OP offered scant details, others offered what they thought of it based on that. Nobody knows the real story.

A detailed quote and probably a phone call to the construction- not installation- supervisor at the cable co would be advised if there was a desire to get to the bottom of the matter. In most cable co's, installations is a "light duty" department that won't likely be doing the bulk of the work as described by OP. They almost assuredly wouldn't operate with dually's with 1 ton hydraulic buckets. That's more in the lane of a construction department.

A bit of advice if you will.

A lot of people can get their nose out of joint when they perceive they are being ripped off (be it reality or not). This often comes out in their demeanor whether or not they intend it to when engaging others. My grandmother always used to say (God rest her blessed soul) "you catch more flies with honey than lemons".
 

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You can't just attach 600+ feet of cable to a tap - plant levels will not support that. I all reality the whole thing may require a re-design with a line extender cut in just before the lateral down the pole.

Sometimes it is not as simple as attaching a cable. I understand that you and your friend are frustrated but this is not a clear cut issue. Also, one of the previous posts were correct about this being a matter of plant construction, not just an install.
 

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The planning department in shaw (not a front end dept) is the dept responsible for these types of requests. You should request a contact number for the planning supervisor and speak with them on this. They may be open to negotiation for subsidizing their construction/access costs with a service agreement.
 

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perhaps if your neighbours want to become shaw customers too, then the work they would require to do would pay off in the end. Perhaps they can work out some kind of a deal or negociate?
 

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You're not alone with this problem. When we upgraded our small business internet and phone service 18 months ago, we asked Shaw what they could offer, and they wanted $5000 to do a cable drop to our building (a small office/retail building with about 8 businesses). Apparently it didn't have cable yet, although we are located in a central commercial district. We weren't going to pay that much, and none of the other business tenants were either. But apparently Shaw decided to go ahead anyway at some point in the last year, and they are now bombarding us with promotional offers to sign up for the new Shaw cable business internet/phone service in our building. I guess they decided that it made sense at some point. I just wish they'd made the decision earlier.
 

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Very few things in life are perfect- especially the first time round. If at first you don't get a satisfactory answer, gather your wits and best manners, and head to the company (virtually or physically) and get a contact to someone who can help.
A lot of times, companies have "policies" that are cookie cutters for the vast majority (high 90's) percentage of the time, and there are ALWAYS one off's. Not every instance is the same, and if you can convice someone that has the authority to "break the mold" so to speak, there is an excellent chance that something could get done.
It is often the "rule" to follow guidelines set forth by precedent and therefore not challenge conventional wisdom. Not all companies follow this, nor are they completely inflexible.

One thing to remember is that for instance at one point it may be too uneconomical to do something today, but possibly there is a way to "break even or close to it down the road. So trying again never hurts.
I cannot re-iterate enough that your approach to people you want something from is crucial to its inevitable success. If you're a grumpy demanding bear, whomever you are conversing with can just shut the door and hide behind "policy". However if you present a clear concise case, understand that they have to sell the idea to someone higher up the food chain, and give them a reasonable case to justify any expenditures, I think you might find your chances of success are going to much better.

Nobody likes to be treated inhumanly or rudely.
 

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+1 Holger. You have to tailor your approach to the situation. It's sometimes necessary to be forceful and obstinate but that is generally productive only if you've caught the other party with their pants down and they're trying the "What, me?" game. If you are asking for something you're not strictly entitled to, well, being aggressive is often a great route to ignoresville. As you said, a calm approach buttressed by a sensible business case that gives the other party a chance to "help" you will get action most often.
 

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as noted the price may or may not be fair so

To get the answer you need, request Shaw provide you with a written quote breaking down the associated costs.
Closing since this appears to be going off-topic and the question has been answered.
 
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