Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a Samsung UN46C6400 TV from Costco. I bought it without doing the research that I should of. My previous TV stopped working so I went out to Costco and basically bought what the guy there recommended. The Costco rep said that all of their TVs were 120Hz.

The TV I bought is advertised on the Costco site as 120hz but the manual states otherwise. Page 58 Specifications reads 'Panel Native 1920 x 1080 60Hz' I understand that incoming signals are never more than 60Hz, I also understand that the TV software can increase the frame and can take advantage of the 120Hz screen... if I have one. Does the UNC46C6400 have a 120Hz screen or a 60Hz screen? The manual seems to indicate it is 60Hz. I realize the TV may have the capability to increase the frame rate to 120Hz, but what is the use if it is being delivered to a 60Hz screen. It sounds like a case of 'creative marketing'.

Can someone enlighten me on this.

Cheers & Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,122 Posts
Greetings

Go to the samsung web site and read up on it. 6000 series sets are step up sets when new calibration features start to appear that were not present in those less than 6000 ...

so go and read up.

regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
My question is what is the actual refresh rate of the screen panel?

I am wondering what the real advantage of the frame rate increase is if it is being rendered on a 60Hz panel.

In the specifications section of the manual that came with my TV it says the panel is 1920 x 1080 60Hz...

I downloaded the PDF manual and interestingly they have dropped the '60Hz' in the Panel Description.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,666 Posts
Do you have a Blu-ray player?

If so, the biggest reason to get 120HZ is about 1080p viewing of a Blu-ray movie. Simply put, movies are shot at 24fps, while video content is 30 fps (rounded number before anyone jumps on it). Therefore, any LCD TV is able to display video content fairly easily (60Hz or 120Hz or 240Hz can all be divided by 30 and get an even number). However, 60Hz displays have difficulty with 24fps signals. Therefore, they employ an algorithm called "3:2 pulldown". The effect will never be as good as a display that can handle a 24fps signal without pulldown. Since 24 goes evenly into 120 or 240, these displays don't need to use an algorithm that creates "dirty frames" or judder.

The other arguments in favour of 120Hz displays (like the "it's better for sports" argument) have arguments against it such as "soap opera effect". That said, most higher end LCD TV's these days are 120HZ (or 240Hz) so you are likely getting more features and a better display in any event, but at 1080p/24 there is an unquestioned advantage to 120Hz over 60.

The CNET post seems to indicate that it's a 120Hz as does Samsung's website. I would be surprised if it wasn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
Hi MoreCoffee,

I have a 46UN6500 and also was initially wondering why I was not seeing the 120Hz when I first setup my Samsung. From the link I posted, I thought that the higher 120 hz was simulated when you use the Auto Motion Plus but doing some more googling and now I'm just as confused as you.

I turned the Auto Motion Plus off as I found that I enjoyed the picture quality better when it was set of. With it on, the picture looks too real and vivid. I bought the marketing hype that 120 hz was better but honestly, I don't now if I'm utilizing it or not. I just know that I love the picture so I'm not changing the setting around. Sorry can't be much more help than that.

Cheers,

jayson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I have only had my set for a few days and I am still getting used to it. I have now turned off the Auto Motion Plus as it seemed to cause to much artifacting and at times the pictures was just horrible. In particular a scene in CSI Miami (I never watch the show normally) where there was a shoot out with lots of running, the picture was so blocky it looked awful. More testing is needed but I think the AMP is only useful in well lit studio type scenes. It seems to work very well for hockey games.

I still think the screen in the TV is only 60Hz... even if it is I am very impressed with the picture.
 

·
Member #1
Joined
·
47,683 Posts
The 60 vs 120Hz discussion has been discussed many times since the sets were first introduced 4 years ago. I'd recommend searching the forum as there are a number of good threads discussing with links to lots of informative articles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I did some searching in the forum and have found some discussions on the 60Hz vs 120Hz refresh rates.

My question now though is...

Does the actual panel in my new tv have a 120Hz or 60Hz refresh rate?

If it is in fact a 60Hz refresh rate, I wonder how there can be a benefit of upsampling to 120. I do not doubt that it is better, in fact I am sure it is, there are many testaments to that fact in the forum. I just can't grasp why it is if the end refresh rate is 60Hz.

It it possible the manual is wrong? Maybe the panel is 120Hz...
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top