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Please use this thread to discuss safety equipment related to the installation of OTA antennas, satellite dishes/systems, home theater, etc.

Safety equipment can include equipment related to: fall arrestors, harnesses, positioning apparatus, electrical safety--any equipment used to ensure a safe install.
 

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I was considering if you could point me in the right direction to purchase the correct, and appropriate safety gear for both roof & tower climbing.
I've actually had a fair amount of difficulty finding quality safety gear in retail stores in Canada.

You can easily find the "roof climb gear in a bucket" stuff...but I've found it to be uncomfortable to wear and complicated to use.

While I don't have a lot of experience with safety stuff for roof climbs (I don't often encounter a "dangerous pitch" roof where I feel the need to use safety equipment), I do have plenty of experience with tower climbing. I've found the best equipment is found online at safety equipment manufacturers, as it tends to be a niche market.

So far I have done it without any equipment which I know is foolish! + my family is disappointed !
Obviously not recommended.

The gear for the roof & ladder I assume is pretty standard, although even this im not sure. Also, for towers, I need some basic gear also, my BIL has a old Air Force harness (hooks from the back), but not sure if its appropriate. Also I have no lanyard, or connectors. In some cases I considered installing a line up the tower to hook onto also, but I assume this is an excessive measure.
I can't speak to your particular Air Force setup. A proper harness for roof or tower work should have at least 4 D-ring points: Either side of the hips, back, and chest. It should fit and secure around your legs, waist, chest and over your shoulders.

In terms of connections between the structure (tower) and the harness, you need to consider two requirements: (1) fall protection, and (2) positioning.

The former is obvious. The latter is also very necessary.

By positioning, I'm referring to an apparatus that holds you in a preferred position, with the intention of freeing both of your hands while up the structure. Having both hands free is key...as this enables you to work effectively.

To facilitate positioning, I use what's called a "web rebar assembly". It's basically a "Y" configuration laynard with a locking clasp for each side of your body, and a large locking hook in the middle which connects to the tower. The distance is short between the side hooks and centre large hook, thus keeping you close to the structure, but giving you enough room to maneuver.

For fall safety, I recommend using an energy absorbing laynard. These come in many configurations: Single "leg", double leg (for continuous protection), etc. They tend to be sold in 4' to 6' lengths.

When you fall, these laynards absorb the fall energy...thus preventing you from hitting the end of the laynard in a sudden jolt. Most laynards only absorb fall energy once...and thus must be replaced if ever used. As such, never use a laynard to support a weight load--they are only to be used for fall protection.

Always use energy absorbing laynards. Straight laynards are often sold in safety stores, but these could definitely result in injury or damage should you fall. If you must use straight laynards (typically to reduce cost), buy as short a length as possible (3' is typical).

Note that you should always maintain at least one connection to the tower at all times. I connect the rebar assembly, then reach up connect the laynard, disconnect the assembly, and repeat. It's tedious...but absolutely critical to safety. Never leave yourself unconnected from the structure while climbing.

Another, last priority is choosing equipment to hoist antenna gear up tower, or onto roof, do you have any recommendations...
When ascending a tower, I tie an end of a length of rope to my harness. The rope is probably 40' longer than the tower. Once at the top of the tower, feed the end of the rope through the top of the tower and tie it off. Then pull up the item from the ground, using the tower as a pulley to hold the weight if you need to take a rest. It can be quite tiring to control a large antenna during an ascent up a tower, so it's important to ensure that you can rest the load on the tower if necessary.

At least that's how I do it...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Web Rebar Assembly



Note that you can also buy assemblies constructed with chain links rather than material.

The two smaller hooks attach to the hip D-rings on your harness. The large hook connects to the structure.
 

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Energy Absorbing Laynard (single leg)



Remember to buy a laynard with one large rebar hook. Smaller locking hooks won't connect to a typical tower.

Never use a small hook and wrap it around a tower structure and connect it to the laynard. Only a locking hook should connect to the structure. This prevents wear on the laynard material.

The smaller locking hook typically attaches to the back D-ring on your harness.
 

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Harness

I use a DBI Sala Exofit harness. Mine has the optional (and detachable) "seat", which is meant to improve comfort in situations where you're hanging for long periods of time. While a premium harness, more affordable and equally safe options are available.

 

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Energy Absorbing Laynard (double leg)

 

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Hmm, Jase, this great...


rebar is essential !


I imagine double leg lanyard is more comfi shoud you fall, so I assume it attaches on clamp to each ring on either HIP side of harness...?

I think same equipment can be used on roof, except not sure of lanyard length & best method of attachmnent to fixed attachment point on roof...though each roof is different....

I would submit to you that a roof (no matter the pitch, even if flat) is as dangerous or more dangerous than the tower in terms of potential falls and resulting injuries ....its just that we beome accustomed to assume there is nothing to it !

I have NEVER seen a single roof worker, EVER tie-off to ANY roof, so its not surprising, BUT I HAVE seen several near misses (thankfully) where they realized after the fact, that tying off woud have made them a lot more CONFIDENT !


Still not clear on a one-stop, qualified retailer you suggest for ALL the different gear ?

thanks for this thread
 

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Fall arrest gear must be worn if you are working at heights greater than 1M (3ft). Regardless of the pitch of the roof you should be using a fall restraint system to keep you from being able to reach the edge. A fall restraint system can be a single non-energy absorbing lanyard securely anchored and attached to a belt with a single d-ring in the back. Always carefully examine fall arrest and restraint gear before use.
 

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^^^ Deckster, agreed. And I indeed should be wearing safety equipment on a roof at all times.
 

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Ironically the day I completed my fall arrest certification, a family member was working on the roof of a warehouse that was being demolished. He fell through the roof and bounced off beams and trussing as he fell. It was a closed casket funeral. He was 23 years old
 

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@balm. I get most of my safety equipment from Soucie Salo Safety. They have a retail store where I live but also a website. I would think that most moderate sized cities would have a safety supply store that would have staff trained to deal with fall arrest systems.
 

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I imagine double leg lanyard is more comfi shoud you fall, so I assume it attaches on clamp to each ring on either HIP side of harness...?
No, the purpose is not comfort. And you don't use the large hooks on either side of your hips.

The single small hook connects to the D-Ring on your back. You want this connected to your back, as it will keep the leads out of your way, and swing your face away from the structure should you fall.

The purpose of the dual legs is redundancy: So that a hook may be left connected to the structure at all times. You never want a situation where you are not connected to the tower, even for a second. Therefore you move each hook one at a time, secure it, then move the next hook, secure, and repeat.

I think same equipment can be used on roof, except not sure of lanyard length & best method of attachmnent to fixed attachment point on roof...though each roof is different....
Certainly the harness can be used on a roof. Though you would likely want different laynards for this purpose.

Perhaps someone that uses safety equipment on roofs more often can better explain the approach they use.

I have NEVER seen a single roof worker, EVER tie-off to ANY roof, so its not surprising, BUT I HAVE seen several near misses (thankfully) where they realized after the fact, that tying off woud have made them a lot more CONFIDENT !
I've mentioned this in other threads, but safety does slow you down. Without safety equipment in use, I could climb a tower in a fraction of the time. I assume the same is true for workers on a roof structure. Some employers may overlook the use of safety equipment for this very reason: It makes their workers more productive.

But the fines are steep should a government inspector investigate. And supervisors can be found criminally responsible for neglecting or not enforcing safety protocols.
 

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Still not clear on a one-stop, qualified retailer you suggest for ALL the different gear ?

thanks for this thread
We perhaps shouldn't discuss sourcing of equipment in this thread. But due to the complexity and difficulty of obtaining quality equipment, I believe an exception could be made.

I've used Norguard (a Canadian company, based out of Sudbury, ON) for laynards and web rebar assemblies. You can order directly from them, and they'll ship to you.

My harness was bought in the US, but you can get harnesses from Norguard or others.

Unfortunately, I'm not familiar with safety retailers in Quebec.

Alternatively, you can make your own Web Rebar Assembly by visiting a local rock climbing supply store such as Mountain Equipment Coop. You can buy a large locking carabiner "hook", two small carabiners (locking), and what's called a sling.

A sling is a thin but strong rope-like apparatus with loops at the ends that allows climbers to link between safety points on a rock face. I have one, and it's capable of withstanding up to 27kN of force (kilo-newtons) which is more than many carabiners will withstand. I'll post a pic...

Remember: if you decide to use carabiners, use only ones that are certified specifically for climbing. There are many out there not made for this purpose, and are thus dangerous.

And you're most welcome! I hope this information is of good use to yourself and others.
 

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yes, this is exactly why I think this is a good thread....weed out the misconceptions, for one...

After seeing Decksters disturbing post, this brings another question, assuming the retailer doesnt help with methodology...where do we go for training, or certification....again this is niche, so not sure where to start here in QC....


its nice to haveall the fancy equipment, but useless if not used properly....I guess...
 

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Climbing Gear Web Rebar Assembly Equivalent



The large hook has a spring loaded twisting lock for safety and ease of unlocking and attaching with one hand.

Smaller carabiners have twist-screw locks on the gates. If you see red paint, they're unlocked.
 

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After seeing Decksters disturbing post, this brings another question, assuming the retailer doesnt help with methodology...where do we go for training, or certification....again this is niche, so not sure where to start here in QC....
Safety instruction companies are everywhere--it's big business. I would check your local Yellow Pages online. Definitely recommended that you get formal instruction on which equipment to use, and how to use it.
 

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I did several google searches here for Climbing Safety Quebec - and nothing, no results.....did other search terms also, including working Heights, after many results pages with no industrial specific climbing info...so as I suspected, its not easily accessible to the lay public....

I will have to call the work safety board here and see who is qualified, probably thru adult vocational training at one of the school boards...
 

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Did you check just "Safety"?
 
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