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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I'm in the midst of my home theatre build and was wondering if there were any code issues with running the power cord and HDMI cable though a wall (in one end and out the other) without any inwall connections being made?

What I want to do is to have the tv above the fireplace, run the power cord through the wall and then out again into the rack to the left where it will be plugged into a surge protector.

Besides worrying about it touching the fire place exhaust pipe, is there any issues with what I plan?

Thanks,

Work in progress pic:

 

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Running the HDMI cable shouldn't be an issue since it is low voltage cable. However you may want to check your local code. I would recommend getting an in-wall rated cable (available from monoprice).

As for the power wiring, I highly doubt that what you are proposing would meet code. Can you splice a new 14/2 cable into an existing outlet and run it to your proposed outlets above the fireplace - that should meet code.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Timmay,

What you propose is well above my expertise so I would need professional advice on that one.
 

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Extension cords are not designed to be run through construction. It would be a major code violation and could invalidate the house insurance. Spots like this can be difficult. However, I highly recommend that you run a new circuit from the panel to the AV center and TV, with proper outlets installed. There are a number of reasons to do this, not the least of which is protecting the equipment from sags and surges caused by other devices.

Considering the proximity to the fireplace, you definitely want to use a fire rated HDMI cable and most definitely want to avoid using an extension cord in the wall. Depending on local codes or the type of fireplace and chimney, running any type of electrical cable above the fireplace may be against code and could be dangerous. The wiring should have been done before the fireplace was boxed in so that it could be done properly.

You might also want to reconsider placing the TV above the fireplace, or at least providing some sort of protection against heat damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Would something like this fit the bill as far as Ontario codes are concerned? Could I have one end on the front, the other on the side and then run an extention cord down from the outside of the fireplace into the rack?

I drilled a peep hole to look at the exhaust pipe and it's about 7 inches back and to the right of centre, should be safe enough for anything going to the left correct?

Scarybob, I will be replacing the mantle (not shown in the pic) again when I finish sanding and painting the wall. I've recorded the temp above the mantle with the fireplace on and it does a good job in deflecting alot of the heat.

http://www.**************/products/product.asp?c_id=104&cp_id=10425&cs_id=1042505&p_id=4652&seq=1&format=2

 

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Discussion Starter #7
They should just make the power cords to the same standard as what I linked above and save the bother of having to go through this trouble. Do they actually sell that anywhere?
 

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they DO make power chords to that standard. now I don't know if you are asking if those chords are a standard item or are they standard on every new tv? my TV has a chord like that and its removable, I changd mine to a shorter length no problem, i actually had one kicking around, it uses the pc power supply connector.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So according to the link it says "Most local fire codes do not allow high voltage stranded power cables to be run behind a wall. Therefore it is a violation to simply run your standard power cords through the wall. Power cables for in-wall application should be solid core specifically designed for that purpose"

I assume that the cord used in the kit is "solid core". Are you saying that most tv power cords are solid core and therefor fine to run through the walls?
 

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The cable pictured above looks like it is stranded. There are also differences in insulation characteristics and wire gauge between cables designed for construction and extension cord use. The device above does not look like it is approved for use in Canada. Like I said, get a separate circuit installed for the AV equipment with properly installed outlets. Current draw can be quite high when a large screen TV, high power AV receiver, sub and other equipment is on. An AV receiver alone can draw up to 1200 watts at peak volume. Add 400w peak for the sub and 200w for the TV and you are over the rating for a single circuit. (These are peak values so they won't blow a breaker but they impact the equipment in other ways.) Why someone would spend thousands of dollars on an AV setup and not spend a little extra to make sure it is powered properly puzzles me. Providing inadequate power (and other bad installation practices) is a sure way to create performance problems and early failure for electronic devices.
 

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How hard would it be to just cut out a small section of drywall so you can do a clean wiring job to code - and run any low voltage wiring while you're at it? The material cost would be fairly small, plus you'd have peace of mind that it's done properly.
 

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The purpose of the given product is to meet code without having to run a "power" cable in the wall. What you are essentially doing is creating a plug and socket "extension cord" using regular 14/2 Romex wire. The plate with the plug goes behind the TV and the plate with the socket goes to the rack location, then use the supplied cord to run from the socket to the existing house circuit. Between the two outlets you use a length of 14/2 Romex (white electrical) to join the two. This also allows you to use your surge protector on your TV rather than just a regular outlet.

The other good thing about this product is that it already has the the opening for you to run the HDMI through as well. You can pull both HDMI and 14/2 Romex and make the connections afterward.

The down side to this is the cost. I believe the kit costs $80-$100 and it doesn't include shipping or the 14/2 romex.

This will eliminate your need for the power cable in the wall AND you don't need an electrician to install it as you are never connecting directly to your house circuit. The instructions outline step by step exactly how to install it properly so there should be no worry of doing it wrong.
 

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There's a similar solution from PowerBridge: http://www.powerbridgesolution.com/aboutpowerbridge.html

Note that these are CSA approved. The other nice feature with these aside from the relatively easy installation is that it allows you to plug it into a surge suppressor or UPS which you can't easily do if you run a new circuit.

You do want to take note of ScaryBob's comments though regarding potentially overloading the circuit. Before assuming you can run off of the circuit near the cabinet you'll want to check to be sure it isn't already carrying a lot of load. From your pic it appears to be a basement and depending on who did the original reno it wouldn't be at all surprising to find that they ran way too many outlets and lights off that circuit. Unfortunately many basement renos are done by amateur contractors or do-it-yourselfers that don't know or care about proper building code.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the comments guys, I see my own error in assuming that the black cord shown in the pic was the "extention" between the two plates as opposed to the romex wire which is not included.

The basement was finished by the builder so I would assume it is done to the standards of the rest of the house.

I will continue with my little project and come back to this thread when I've placed the mount and ready to route the power supply with either of the two kits.
 

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CEC Code Rule

Violation of CEC 4-010(3)(a)(ii)

"Flexible cord shall not be used....run through holes in walls, ceilings or floors."

Low voltage Data cabling is less sticky, but make sure the cables you choose are FT1 rated or better for fire spread and better terminated in jacks ie do not bring an HDMI cable from your AVR/PVR directly to your TV.

"If you dont know dont go." As an apprentice electrician, my advice is get it done right by a licensed electrician who knows your local building code ammendments. Good luck.:) I've seen my share of bad DIY electrical. If you aren't sure about it and do it yourself grab a green homeowners basic electrical book from Home Depot or the like AND pull a local home owners electrical permit (they are very cheap usually.) Then at least it will be looked at by someone who knows for sure.:cool: Do not skimp or cheap out and do scabby work. Trust me it is not worth the fire risk or nuissance tripping.;)
 

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I now see how these plates are hooked up. (Figured out the non-working link.) Running 14/2 romex between the two plates so that no cord runs through a wall makes sense and most likely meets code. However, the 14/2 installation must still meet code. The device in the original link (from Monoprice) does mention standards approvals so it seems to be Ok in that regard. Note that a large part of the cost for these products is to pay for standards testing and approval. There is no way this device costs that much to make.
 

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I used to make my power cord using the standard 120 volt rated in-wall wire i think it is 14-2 but don't my word for it i have been out of the industry for a bit but there was a change in styles when i use to do installations in newly built condos ,is there are new products like flex pvc piping. so when the new owner that takes ownership of his condo or house the hole is ready for you and just take a coat hangar and fish your wire with es , just remember that in the future things will change and you may want to add or change your cables or TV. I ran into some flat panel tv's with the new ultra slim LCD's with its own and non standard power plug so if today if a was going to build a house or do renovation i would fill my house with conduit or flex piping to be ready for the future. Get ready ,fiber optics are going to becoming more poplar soon. Maybe Cat 5 or 6 will be in the past;)
 

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I have the powerbridge solution with a bunch of install pics in my user profile. The albums are [HERE]

Here is one picture from the album with an in-wall HDMI from monoprice and in-wall speaker cable:

 

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nice product ...i have not seen this one before , most of the time in your configuration that i have seen on your profile is i remove the base boards and cutout about 2 inch of drywall and have the wire come back up then out using a nose plate or a reverse nose plate but that looks really nice if you decide to locate your entertainment unit under the TV.
 
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