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Having all "major services" SD,Bell Fibe, Bell Sat & Rogers at some point, I can only say each had its good & bad points. Channel wise depending on where you are the channels vary. As PBS has been set out fore example, here in Ottawa we get PBS watertown on Bell Fuibe as well as Rogers. At one point Rogers Ottawa wanted to drop PBS watertown in favor of I think was PBS Detroit or Buffalo don't recall which,anyway Rogers reasoning was those two PBS stations showed the same programing as PBS Watertowbn. True, but Watertown also showed programing regarding Ottawa and Eastern Ontario whiuch Buffalo & Detroit diddn't and when when more the 50% of your subs donate monet are from Ottawa & Eastern Ontario for that PBS station Yeah it makes a difference.

True both Bell Fibe & Rogers Ottawa have Detroit instead of Buffalo for ABC,CBS,NBC,& Fox, but Montreal has them from another city, as do other cities in Canada depending on where you are and your provider is.

The only thing I've notice that seems to be the same(in most cases) is it Appears that almost all provider(at least in the Eat have Seattle as the US Western feeds. Yes SD is an exception(or at least the last time I had SD they did).

So all in all each provider has its good points and bad points. And no Fibe(cable) isn't available to all Bell Fibe subs as Iginite isn't available to all Rogers subs as Rogers Fibe is not available everywhere.
 

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...There is no battery backup like the Roger VoIP modem.
Just throwing in another bit of information to complete the picture.

Rogers also has an Ignite service that is expected to be their only/prime offering some time in the future (3 year, 5 years, who knows). It consists of a single integrated modem (without a battery) for internet, phone, and TV. Connection is via the standard coax cable. There may still be a signal on the coax if the local node has battery backup (it is not clear if all nodes have this). You will need to have your own UPS to supply power to the modem, cordless phone, etc. With local node battery backup and a UPS you should be able to have internet and phone service during a short power failure. A lot of if's and should.
 

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Thats the big issues with the discussion over home phones and who to go with as a whole.. who/what is best.

Yes, that overall, not having to have your own battery backup (assuming the node is powered) with rogers is a bonus to go with bell. But bell's home phone line, usually is quite expensive, if you are getting it just by itself (and say wanting your internet through someone else).
(EG: Bell only can offer my 5mbps dsl... vs rogers can give me 1gbps. So would be paying a lot more, to go with rogers & bell home phone.


A major thing that a LOT of people dont factor in as well.. is the phone itself.

More than 3/4 of the people I know who still have home phone (and havent ditched it all together), are using only cordless phones. Which again unless the base station is on a batter backup, will not function when the power is out.
A lot of people dont have a corded phone anymore..
 

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I have Rogers Ignite and separate VOIP service. Different strokes for different folks. I have never had a UPS (never is a long time), and have been fortunate in my area that there are only 3 or 4 power outage per year. So lack of power is not a critical issue for me. And a UPS will likely not last through an extended power outage.

Everyone's needs and preferences are different, and luckily there is a usually a reasonable solution for each situation.
 

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... and have been fortunate in my area that there are only 3 or 4 power outage per year.
How badly has the power system degraded that only 3 or 4 is not many? These seem shockingly high numbers compared to what I remember in Ontario in the 1970s through 1990s. Moving to Quebec in the 1980s was eye-opening, as they were far more frequent there.

It's for reasons like this that I insist on copper-wire phone service.
 

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It's for reasons like this that I insist on copper-wire phone service.
You may find that copper doesn't go any further than the curb.
 

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There are lots of areas that have not been upgraded beyond POTS, even in major cities. The GTA gets priority for upgrades of all kinds from Bell. Much of Toronto has been upgraded twice since the last time POTS was rebuilt here and that was only done due to the street being dug up to upgrade city services. The only time we hear from Bell is to try and sell services that don't exist and complain about lack of customers in the area. They just need to compare what they offer with Rogers services to see the reason why.
 

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I would have to agree with ExDilbert. Toronto, and maybe a few select other major urban centers seem to be Bells priority.
Your lucky to barely even have decent POTS even in some cities.

I live in Keswick. Probably a population over 30k now. So not huge by any means, but not tiny either. And expanding continually.
Rogers is currently able to provide 1gbps service (though I havent tested it myself, on how well they can provide it.. but I am on 500 and can almost always get close to 590)

Bell has done NOTHING it seems to really try and upgrade anything much north of Newmarket. Most areas north of newmarket do not have access to even basic FIBE.
There is one subdivision in keswick which can get it, but I think maxes at 50mbps service (might not even be that).
The rest of the city, they only can provide 5mbps DSL. Their POTS lines and supporting infrastructure is that poor. Let alone the rural people who live just outside of town.. from talking with most locals they are lucky to get 2mbps.



Thats my biggest/hardest complaint when comparing them.
People are always like "Switch to bell Fibe, its much better"
Well, thats all dependant on where you live, for everyone, that is not always an option.
(Dont even get me started on the people who will still try and bring up the whole 'its shared' argument for cable now :p)
 

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The speed issues cable had in the early days was fixed 10-15 years ago. Rogers has fibre to the last mile and the last mile is high bandwidth cable, not low bandwidth twisted pair like FTTN. For most current consumer requirements, cable is as good as FTTH. Cable does not have the massive bandwidth of fibre but most residential users have any use for more than cable offers and it will remain that way for years. Meanwhile, FTTN Fibe maxes out at 100Mbps, which is a small fraction of what cable provides and is barely adequate for power users and families.
 

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If I can watch Netflix and Prime (and even Crave) in HD on my 5 Mbps POTS ADSL (about 0.6 Mbps up), I'd think that no one with 50 or 100 Mbps should be having any problems unless they are uploading a lot.

Yeah, there are times when there are 3 people trying to stream stuff that it starts to be a bit of a problem. And the day is coming I'll have to upgrade - but the whole cable versus fibe debate is surely irrelevant to most users, as both have extreme excess capacity.
 

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It definitely depends on where you are in general. Here in NB, we have FTTH Fibe in lots of places because Bell Aliant rolled it out early, it's largely above ground infrastructure (making it much cheaper to deploy than working underground), and the government gave grants to get it done. Meanwhile, Rogers inherited an out of date Shaw system and hasn't invested what it would take to get it up to equivalence to their Ontario service (which, to be fair, would be very expensive). So Rogers isn't even in the same league, but they do offer good pricing as their way of competing.

There's no way to make a single comparison between them and have it apply universally cross country.

I'm watching Prime in 4k HDR while streaming Stingray upstairs in my son's room and my wife is doing stuff online. 5 Mbps ADSL would not get it done. God forbid when I buy a game on Steam and have to do a 40GB download.
 

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But how does 5Mbps DSL work with multiple users or a family? It might handle one or two light simultaneous uses but beyond that there will be issues. I had problems with Netflix on 5Mbps DSL which is why I upgraded to cable. Never mind that major downloads like Windows updates took many hours and potentially impacted other things like Netflix. In addition, Fibe TV is not available with DSL.

50Mb and 100Mb DSL2 places limits on Fibe TV use. It's 3 or 4 simultaneous channels (watch or record) which is easy to exceed during prime time, especially for families. Get a gamer and a download or two on top of that and it's beyond its limits. Google's new Stadia gaming service is reported to use up to 50Mbps. Try that on 5Mbps DSL or even on 50Mbps DSL2 when other people are streaming TV. :eek:
 

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But how does 5Mbps DSL work with multiple users or a family? It might handle one or two light simultaneous uses but beyond that there will be issues. I had problems with Netflix on 5Mbps DSL which is why I upgraded to cable. Never mind that major downloads like Windows updates took many hours and potentially impacted other things like Netflix. In addition, Fibe TV is not available with DSL.
I've got Rogers Cable - about a $40 package, combined with the $35 for the ADSL. Neither Rogers nor Bell have come close to matching that on price.

One user I don't see any problems with Netflix ... it's rated for 6 Mbps, but I usually only see 5. Now, before Bell rebuilt the neighbourhood for fibre it might have been more of a problem, as 3 Mbps was more typical.

Two users is starting to push it - but generally if the kids are streaming something, I'm not. I've no idea how long Windows updates take ... it's all in the background. The 0.5 GB ones for the phone don't seem to be a problem.

5 Mbps gives you about 2 GB an hour. How big are these Windows updates ... should be about to do 15 GB overnight easily enough?

The only real issue I noticed is when I switched to online backups. Now that took a few days to upload when I started - but now it's only incremental I don't notice it at 2 in the morning.

50Mb and 100Mb DSL2 places limits on Fibe TV use. It's 3 or 4 simultaneous channels (watch or record) which is easy to exceed during prime time, especially for families. Get a gamer and a download or two on top of that and it's beyond its limits. Google's new Stadia gaming service is reported to use up to 50Mbps. Try that on 5Mbps DSL or even on 50Mbps DSL2 when other people are streaming TV. :eek:
That's good to know ... as I've now got (non-Bell using Bell lines) 50 and 100 options ... best to stick to Rogers then! No gamers here yet. Might be a bigger issue when the kids get older. But so far it's working. And I can easily double or treble the ADSL pipe for another $10 to $15 a month.
 

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And I can easily double or treble the ADSL pipe for another $10 to $15 a month.
Which is what I chose to do. Switched from 5/.75Mbps DSL for $35 (plus modem purchase) to 35/5Mbps for $45/mo (including modem rental.) Haven't looked back. I see unlimited 30Mbps cable for as little as $50. That's 6 times the bandwidth and a lot more data for an extra $15. Price per Mbps is a small fraction of the cost with the higher speed plan and unlimited data means no surprises on the bill. 6Mbps DSL is up to $41/mo or more for new customers so it's just not worth it. I find that higher speed tiers have other advantages such as much faster web site response times. I'm no longer wasting time (sometimes hours) waiting for large downloads or leaving the PC on all night or all day for Windows updates to complete.
 

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Note: since we are comparing Bell Fibe TV with Rogers, it should be Rogers CABLE vs Bell Fibe TV, or better yet, why not compare Rogers IGNITE TV (IPTV) with Bell Fibe TV (also IPTV) so we can have a direct apples vs apples comparison, because Rogers has a non iptv called Rogers Digital cable, and bell has a on iptv service called Bell Satellite (formerly Bell Expressview)

The only reason my dad wants to stay with Rogers Digital Cable is because he invested $$$ into his Set Top Boxes and memorized all the channel numbers, but he has been quite upset with Rogers over the years with their technological issues in his neighbourhood. I would not see him jumping to fibe tv cus it would definitely cost him more than he is paying for now and he is old school so he would not like calling every 1 to 2years looking for a deal, he wants to keep it simple, he does not need to call rogers every year for a deal he simply has his grandfathered cable package and keeps the great price. A lot of people forget that this is great, that you can keep a price and not have to waste your time by calling in to renew discounts and promos, me too im the kind of guy with a busy family of 4 who has very little time to call and ask for promotions and credits. no body likes dealing with billing so try to make a package that u dont have to call often and it will pay off in the long run
 

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Note: since we are comparing Bell Fibe TV with Rogers, it should be Rogers CABLE vs Bell Fibe TV, or better yet, why not compare Rogers IGNITE TV (IPTV) with Bell Fibe TV (also IPTV) so we can have a direct apples vs apples comparison, because Rogers has a non iptv called Rogers Digital cable, and bell has a on iptv service called Bell Satellite (formerly Bell Expressview)

The only reason my dad wants to stay with Rogers Digital Cable is because he invested $$$ into his Set Top Boxes and memorized all the channel numbers, but he has been quite upset with Rogers over the years with their technological issues in his neighbourhood. I would not see him jumping to fibe tv cus it would definitely cost him more than he is paying for now and he is old school so he would not like calling every 1 to 2years looking for a deal, he wants to keep it simple, he does not need to call rogers every year for a deal he simply has his grandfathered cable package and keeps the great price. A lot of people forget that this is great, that you can keep a price and not have to waste your time by calling in to renew discounts and promos, me too im the kind of guy with a busy family of 4 who has very little time to call and ask for promotions and credits. no body likes dealing with billing so try to make a package that u dont have to call often and it will pay off in the long run
Not always necessarily 17671.

Grandfathered plans do not always stay the same way, same pricing.
Rogers for example, got rid of the old bundle discounts quite a while ago on their old stuff.
Generally the TV plan, etc may be cheaper possibly compared to some of the new ones..
But even so, they are subject to the yearly increases.
So the price, will go up :(

Internet can be a big one for changes. There are times where I have seen that some of the older grandfathered ones are actually MORE money overall comparatively.. where you get more speed, and more usage (or unlimited) for the same price as the old grandfathered one.


Not saying, that people need to switch to the newest one.

Each person needs to compare what they have vs what they can get.
And yes sometimes that may take work, calling in, etc :(
 

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Internet can be a big one for changes. There are times where I have seen that some of the older grandfathered ones are actually MORE money overall comparatively.. where you get more speed, and more usage (or unlimited) for the same price as the old grandfathered one.
That's why it's important to call occasionally, to see about updating your plans. When I did that, about 3 years ago, my bill dropped by about $50/month and I was moved from Ignite 60 to Ignite 75. I also got a new cable modem, which supported IPv6.
 

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Same here. The upgraded modem (unavailable on the former plan) was more reliable and overall responsiveness increased noticeably. They also offered unlimited Ignite 150 for $5 more. That didn't provide as great an improvement but the faster downloads and unlimited data cap were worth it.
 
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