Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
This does not sound like an HDD issue but it's possible. It sounds like it may be an overheating issue. One common cause is dirt accumulating in the unit and vents. That's usually fixed by taking the cover off and cleaning the device with compressed air (available in cans at Costco.) However, the people who made the Nextbox decided to make if very difficult to take apart without special tools and somewhat difficult even with them. One quick fix might be to use compressed air or a vacuum to clean the vents. Blowing accumulated dirt into the unit is not recommended. Use the compressed air or vacuum very carefully at the fan vent so the fan is not damaged. Other vents could also be carefully cleaned.

Another common cause of problems is the switching power supply. That, again, could be due to dirt or a component overheating. Make sure the Nextbox has lots of space above and around it and is not over other devices that created heat or in a warm cabinet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
I believe it's discussed in the thread about replacing the Nextbox drive. A security torx screwdriver or two is required. The best bet is a set available from Princess Auto or Ebay for about $10. A handle that takes the bits is also required. I haven't done it for awhile but I recall removing the top cover screws, the top cover, then removing the front cover (clipped on) and an internal cover.

As for the fan, I would just place it beside or behind the box to force air under and over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
I look at the CAV10455HD: 6 screws at the bottom, one screw each on the right and left panels and one screen in the back panel above the HDMI. Which panel should I remove first? A bit worried because I may break something.
As I recall, the bottom cover provides no access. Ignore it. The two side screws need to be taken out to remove the top cover. Not sure but I don't think the back screw needs to be removed. I believe the top cover is also clipped in so the sides need to be flexed out to remove it. Under the top cover is a metal plate that needs to be removed. Once done that provides full access.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
I would use a small brush attachment on the vacuum and just run it carefully over any visible vents. Turn the suction of the vacuum down if possible. Do not push the nozzle up against the vents as it could dislodge or damage something inside. The same goes for the compressed air. Hold it an inch or two away from visible vents. If the cover is removed, hold the compressed air a few inches away from components and fans and clean the entire inside surface, including vents. Also clean the cover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
Also, who manufactured these boxes: Cisco or Technicolor?
Cisco designed and sold the Nextbox units originally. They sold the rights to Technicolor, which is basically a holding company that buys the rights to products the original manufacturer no longer wants to manufacture, sell or support. Cisco did such a bad job on these boxes that they faced a support problem to fix all the firmware bugs. I wouldn't be surprised if they were concerned about lawsuits as well. Someone at Rogers seems to have been doing the firmware support for that past few years. Every new firmware seems to introduce more bugs than it fixes. They've broken the whole home function in major ways by eliminating handshaking in order to gain some minor speed improvements. Other changes requested by customers have created a number of unintended side effects. Things don't ever seem to get better with new firmware. It changes the workarounds required for newly introduced bugs or existing bugs that are only half fixed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
How about the Seagate Skyhawks 1TB Surveillance Drive?
The Seagate drive should be fine. The PVR should format the drive automatically. My experience is that the PVR needs an MBR partition table on the drive. Most drives come with one large partition so it should be good to go. If it doesn't format, the drive may need to be formatted with an MBR partition table using a PC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
The dimension of this pad is 33mm x 20mm x 8mm. I called Canada Computer, they do not sell thermal pad at all. While Amazon do sell thermal pads, they are all too thin: 0.5mm, 1mm, 1.5mm and 3mm.
It would likely be possible to stack the pads to get the right thickness. As the original was not making contact with the metal top, I would go a little thicker. Another thing to do might be to add just enough padding between the plastic cover and the metal cover to force contact. Use something soft and flexible so that it doesn't put a lot of pressure on the chip and motherboard underneath.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
I was thinking something like a small piece of soft foam weatherstripping. The major issue with doing this is that it could put too much pressure on the motherboard and cause damage, especially if the case receives any pressure in that location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
Hard drives rarely overheat as long as the ambient temperature is within range. Installing a hard drive that produces too much heat for the enclosure, such as a 7200 or higher RPM drive, could cause issues for the entire unit. Hard drive overheating can also be an indication of impending failure. A lower power drive designed for video is a better choice. In this situation, I would be looking at what is causing the overheating or ways to cool the entire enclosure. It may be that a component is failing and the fan is only a stop gap measure. Failures commonly occur in power supplies, low quality capacitors, hard drives or from damage caused by outside events such as power surges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
The Toshiba HD sounds like it may be the original. They were good drives. I had one in a PC and it ran a bit hot but not overly so. Going into the diagnostic screen will show some hard drive data. Not sure if it shows the temperature. I don't think it shows SMART data which would be more telling of the hard drive condition.

Power surges can arrive from other sources such as the incoming coax cable. I had a couple of boxes fried due to overhead lightning and an ungrounded cable (since fixed.)

Components such as capacitors and semiconductors can become heat sensitive or fail. Modern motherboards usually contain high quality capacitors and other parts but who knows what they put in the Nextbox. They can fail with time. Power supply components see the most stress due to the high currents and voltages they use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,620 Posts
The best way to check the drive is to connect it to a PC, preferably one running Linux, and checking the SMART parameters. SMART software also allows for non-destructive testing of the entire drive surface. Nextbox drives use a Linux file system and can be inspected quite easily on Linux systems. Don't make any changes to the drive as doing so can make it unusable in the Nextbox or trigger a format.

Most newer hard drives can easily last 5 years or more but a small percentage will fail each year. Some NAS, surveillance video and server drives have a 5 year warranty, a rated one million hour MTBF with continuous use and are best left on. That contrasts with consumer drives made a decade or two ago that had much lower use and lifetime ratings and came with a 2 or 3 year warranty. The warranty is a good predictor of drive life as makers may shorten the warranty on a model if they end up replacing them too often. Some drives with longer warranties cost more but that may just be to cover the extra service and support that goes with the longer warranty.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top