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My beloved ISP sent me this email:
Dear Rogers Yahoo! customer,

We are writing to inform you that on July 1, 2009, your Flickr Pro account included with your Rogers Hi-Speed Internet service will change to a free Flickr account. The free Flickr service has many of the same features as Pro, but is subject to some limits.

Your existing photos or videos will not be deleted as a result of this change. If you have more than 200 photos in the free Flickr account, only the most recent 200 are displayed. Other changes include:

• 100MB monthly upload limit (10MB per photo)
• 2 video uploads each month (max. 90 seconds and 150MB per video)
• Only smaller (resized) images accessible (though the originals are saved in case you upgrade later)

If you enjoy the full flexibility and storage capacity of your current Flickr Pro account, you can maintain your Pro account by subscribing directly to the service for $24.95 (USD) a year. Subscribe before September 1, 2009 and get two months free. Click the link below to subscribe:
http://flickr.com/upgrade

For additional information or questions, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/ca/rogers/flickr/index.html

We want to thank you for being a Rogers Yahoo! customer. It is our pleasure to provide you with an enjoyable online photo experience.

Sincerely,

Rogers Yahoo! Hi-Speed Internet Customer Service
Unfortunately, I can't get any other ISP provider here (in Thornhill, could you believe it?!).
 

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So let me understand this.

Rogers used to give you a flickr pro account free of charge.

Now you have pay $24.95 USD to keep it.

If you don't, you get a "lite" version that is insufficient.

Does that sum it up?
 

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Rogers explains

I'm in the communications group at Rogers and wanted to provide a bit of an explanation.

A very small number of our customers (less than 2 per cent) took advantage of the Flickr Pro service. For the vast majority of our customers, the bigger priority is faster speeds and more reliable service.

Last week, we doubled download speeds for hundreds of thousands of customers. We continue to invest in our network and look forward to bringing increasingly faster speeds to all our customers.
 

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I'm in the communications group at Rogers and wanted to provide a bit of an explanation.

A very small number of our customers (less than 2 per cent) took advantage of the Flickr Pro service. For the vast majority of our customers, the bigger priority is faster speeds and more reliable service.

Last week, we doubled download speeds for hundreds of thousands of customers. We continue to invest in our network and look forward to bringing increasingly faster speeds to all our customers.
Thanks for the reply, but it still doesn't explain why it's being taken away. If a relatively small amount, 2% of subscribers are using the service, then it can't be costing that much to keep some customers happy?
 

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At two per cent that is 30,000 subscribers that are being forced to spend U.S. $25.
 

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I was wondering how long this would last before they yanked it away, and they almost managed 1 year. Bravo.

They probably couldn't plaster a Pro account with their own ads like they do with our webmail because Flickr wouldn't let them so it's just being scrapped. Fully keeping in line with Rogers' motto of "Less service for more money!".
 

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$25 seems fair.
I don't think anyone is arguing that $25 a year is unreasonable for Flickr Pro, the point is that it used to be bundled free into a $30 to $60 a month (HSI extreme which I think is there #1 service at $60 a month) service.

For people who use the service, their internet service just went up in price by another 4% to 8% after price increases earlier this year. HSI extreme jumped 10% earlier this year

As recently as August 2006, Rogers Extreme customers were paying $46.95 with no bandwidth caps. Now they pay $59.99 plus $2.50 a month for Flickr with bandwidth caps.
 

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Also in the last couple of years, Rogers has introduced DPI, bandwidth throttling, caps, now hijacks failed DNS lookups, and will alter users webpages when they want to "inform" you of stuff.

Add it all up and, what was once a feature laden service at a reasonable price, has become an expensive, feature less service with caps and intrusive Orwellian features.

Add in the savimize and the featailor campaigns and what's not to hate!
 

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I'm in the communications group at Rogers and wanted to provide a bit of an explanation.

A very small number of our customers (less than 2 per cent) took advantage of the Flickr Pro service. For the vast majority of our customers, the bigger priority is faster speeds and more reliable service.

Last week, we doubled download speeds for hundreds of thousands of customers. We continue to invest in our network and look forward to bringing increasingly faster speeds to all our customers.
Except when we decide the throttle down the "faster speeds"
 

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Seriously... Add this to my bundles being expired and the prices going up and the services going down.. I'm finding it harder and harder to send Rogers $180 every month... I'd much rather just send the money straight to Flickr and not let Rogers take a cut.. Now if only I can find a way to get HDTV and internet service without Rogers(I can't get Bell for TV) I'd hop on that in a second!!
 

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No surprise. I doubt Rogers pays Flickr $25 a month for all its subscribers, but it will have to pay a portion of the total and I am sure that cost is increasing regularly.

A recent report - I think it was The New York Times Business section - examined how services like Flickr are in trouble. Their users demand huge amounts of storage and bandwidth, not to mention the electricity to run it all. Users are indiscriminate about what they upload and store, because it's all "free". Costs are increasing while no significant advertising revenue is coming in.

The report suggested that many of these services, including Flickr and even the mighty Facebook, are threatened if they cannot produce profits. Facebook had precious little advertising despite its huge user base; other have even less. Google has similar operating-cost issues but at least Google has figured out how to make a profit.

If anyone is serious about storing large volumes of data, including back-up files, there are services which charge for what you use, e.g. Amazon web services charges for the storage space and the bandwidth consumed uploading and downloading. Other services offer flat-rates with caps. I keep my photo library and critical data backed-up, safe from fire, burglary and system failure for about what Flickr Pro would cost and it's well worth the peace-of-mind. Services like this, with a viable business, are far more likely to be around than the freebies.

Rogers' announcement elicited no response here.
 

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Clarification Some folks keep saying $19.99 or $25 per month. The rates are $19.99 or $25 per year.
 
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