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...a company that's on the verge of going bankrupt...
RIM has no debt.

My employer use to develop Java apps for BB and gave up once they bought the iPads.
Could it be that they're waiting for BB10, like most developers? Until BB10 is market-ready, I don't see a lot of developers investing resources into it.

I honestly think that this device will only cater to those that have a fascination with RIM devices
This statement could easily be applied to many Apple customers. I've also encountered people who've bought into Android simply because it wasn't MSFT, Apple, RIM, etc.
 

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Myself, I prefer to save the money, buy a Nexus 7 and tether it with my Galaxy Nexus.
And in the end you've achieved exactly what you can do with a PlayBook and BlackBerry smartphone. In fact, Bridge takes tethering to the next level.

The phone's keyboard and trackpad act as a wireless mouse for when you have the PlayBook attached to a projector or TV to give a presentation. Don't like tapping on the touch-screen keyboard? Use the phone's physical keyboard.

The bridged messages/calendar mean you have one less device to hassle with for syncing.

As for other features I don't see the Nexus 7 anywhere further ahead than the PlayBook. If you enjoy multimedia, the PlayBook's speakers blow away the ones in the Nexus 7 which face the wrong way.
 

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hardware wise, the playbook is the nicest tablet to hold bar none

it feels better, and sounds better than all the rest

it's too bad it wasn't supported softwarewise the way android is
 

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Could it be that they're waiting for BB10, like most developers? Until BB10 is market-ready, I don't see a lot of developers investing resources into it.
Nope, they are not waiting for 10. They are quite confident that enough profit can be made with the iPads, seeing that OS 5 and 6 gave nothing but issues on both the hardware front and the software front. I can mail you the 6 9780's that I have which died from white screens and other failures if you'd like.

I know that the PlayBook has seamless integration with a BlackBerry smartphone, but alas, you are locked to.. OMG.. a BlackBerry. With the Nexus 7, I can nearly take any device powered by Gingerbread or newer and tether it. Google restores my calendar, contacts, and other information to a new device or between other devices. I recall Google being able to doing that before the PlayBook was released to the masses.

I could care less about the speakers as the device is designed to entertain myself, not piss off the people around me. If I wanted to watch movies, I'd bring along a notebook on my travels and not burn out my eyes focusing to a 7" screen.

Now I am not going to continue to fuel ssbtech's responses, because they are one-sided towards RIM, with a lack of knowledge about other devices (or so it would seem). I've had my chances to play with the Playbook, various Android devices, and a few Apple devices. Android was the definite choice for myself, and iOS for the employer. RIM has proved to be little worth to my employer, and the only reason why we continue to use their hardware is due to a corporate decision (buy-out of my employer). If we did not have a corporate influence, we would have dumped RIM some time ago.

My responses are not fueled with ignorance, but with the experiences of having to deal with a phone manufacturer that just simply was interested in pumping out devices with a lack of quality control. I will say that my work phone (9790) is a lot more polished in that regard, but it took RIM too damn long to correct those flaws.

Sorry, but there is no way that myself or others that I know that have faced these issues will be turned back to RIM.
 

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Any piece of mass produced consumer electronics will have a failure rate. Remember all the apple PC's with counterfeit Nichicon capacitors that started to bulge and crap out?

The Nexus 7 isn't without problems either - many reports of touchscreen failures, crappy speaker sound, loose screens and light leakage. The iPhones haven't been without flaws either.

So go ahead, bash RIM based on the bad batch of phones you got and I'll be happily using my Torch 9800 and PlayBook as I have for many months.

I bought the PlayBook because I liked it and I knew that developer support would grow as it has been. I've used iPads and various Android tablets and frankly find the iPad too big and the Android software was slow and clunky. (I know I shouldn't bash android based on one bad experience several months ago, but that seems to be the typical approach to RIM bashing here so why not...)

My PlayBook has replaced my laptop as my "carry along" device. If I need to do any "serious" work I'll use my PC. No tablet will replace the PC. The 7" screen is perfect for browsing the web (I'll go sit at the coffee shop, beach, whatever and browse forums and read the news) and it's small enough to sit on the corner of the table out of the way when you want to have coffee with a friend.

Is it perfect? No. I'd like a stylus for more accurate writing input and an SD card slot would be nice, but every tablet will have its shortfalls and you have to weigh them against eachother to pick the best for you. I did, and the PlayBook won out easily.
 

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hardware wise, the playbook is the nicest tablet to hold bar none

it feels better, and sounds better than all the rest
It's nice to hold. Light weight and I can lay on the couch and I can waste much time playing Angry Birds on it. My arms are getting tired holding up an iPad after about 15 minutes.


it's too bad it wasn't supported softwarewise the way android is
I bought it because I liked it, knowing that software support was limited. But I also knew that the dev base wouldn't grow unless people did buy the PlayBook. Slowly but surely support is growing.
 

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Slowly but surely support is growing.
That's true, but it still worries me. When the Playbook was first discounted, it was the best deal in the market segment. $200 couldn't get you any other hardware close to as good, with the exception of the near impossible to find Touchpad blowout.

However, while they've sold a lot of Playbooks, the Nexus 7 is almost assuredly just the first in a wave of $200-300 tablets. Quality hardware in that price range will become the norm very soon, and while Playbook sales maybe won't stop altogether, I'd have to assume they will slow substantially. If the installed base is currently around 1.3 million, I can't see it going well above 1.5 million, unless they bring new hardware or the LTE version takes off against all odds.

If 1.3 million users isn't enough to draw the attention of app developers (and for the majority, it hasn't been) then does anyone really think 1.5 million will?

While the app selection at the moment isn't nothing, and the ones that do exist are all very nicely optimized for the 7 inch screen, it's still missing a lot of important apps. Google has shown no interest in releasing any of their apps on the Playbook. There's no Netflix or Slingplayer. MLB's At Bat is nowhere to be found. Though you can (and I did) port the Android app, there is still no native Kindle app. I can't find anything like Google Currents or Flipboard. There's no Flixster. Many popular games are still MIA. Most banks don't have a Playbook app. The selection of instant messaging clients is really pathetic, and you can't even use the front facing camera for video chatting unless you know someone who owns another Playbook (I don't).

These absences are huge problems for RIM. While Apple and Google build lots of in-house apps, RIM seems to be relying on third party devs and so far they haven't come through in a lot of areas. Going forward, building dev support needs to be the number one priority for RIM.

The Playbook is still a decent platform, but right now it just can't compete on software support. Android tablets and the iPad can do pretty much everything the Playbook can do, and much more. And now Android is competing on price too. So why does RIM believe they can sit just below the iPad in pricing on the LTE model?
 

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It makes sense that Google won't develop applications for a competing platform. Now that Skype is owned by MS, I don't see them doing anything to support a competing tablet either.

What's sad is companies like Netflix saying there's not enough interest in the platform for them to develop for it, yet it's Netflix's own disinterest in the PlayBook that's helping to kill interest in the first place.

Every piece of Google software I've used has been awkward and disjointed. Heck, just the signup process for Gmail and Youtube is about as convoluted as landing Curiosity on Mars. I never found Android to be very intuitive either.

Interestingly, every time I've shown my PlayBook to one of my friends who has an iDroid device they've always been impressed.
 

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Google makes numerous apps for iOS, and they used to make apps for BlackBerry. They just don't see the need to spend resources on the Playbook, just like Netflix. Neither company has any vested interest in setting the Playbook become a success, so they'll wait until it does on its own before they show up. And given how widely used many of their services are, it's a big deal not to have them.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
It is a bit surprising that there are not more of the "big apps" for the PlayBook. RIM has come out and said they would send out developers to Neftlix, Skype etc... at a moments notice to create the app with them and get it out there. They must feel that it's not worth their while to do this on the PB platform, which is a shame. Unless you have a significant slice of the market, it's an uphill battle.
 

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That's true, but it still worries me. When the Playbook was first discounted, it was the best deal in the market segment. $200 couldn't get you any other hardware close to as good, with the exception of the near impossible to find Touchpad blowout.
For $200, I'm not worried. I'm definitely getting my money's worth out of the investment in a Playbook.

Heck, just the signup process for Gmail and Youtube is about as convoluted as landing Curiosity on Mars.
How very true! I consider myself a technically-inclined person. But signing up to Gmail was painful.

My other issue with Google is their apparent lack of concern for privacy. Now their technology will be scanning the text in your personal email, looking to improve search results.
 

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But it's not about whether current owners think it was a worthy investment. I don't regret mine. This is about whether RIM can sell enough of these going forward to make themselves relevant again. Remember that devs that support the Playbook are more likely to support BB10, while those who don't are much less likely to get on board until BB10 devices sell well.

Google has always done that (Microsoft and Yahoo do too, that's how you can search your email), the results are just showing up somewhere new. But that's a totally different issue. Google services are already used by hundreds of millions of users. I would imagine that most people are more likely to choose a tablet that supports the services they currently use than to choose new services that work better with a tablet they might buy.

Google is not having trouble acquiring users, either for their services or for their mobile OS. RIM is. That means they have to be the one to make changes.
 

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But it's not about whether current owners think it was a worthy investment. I don't regret mine. This is about whether RIM can sell enough of these going forward to make themselves relevant again.
The issue for RIM is that their current Java-based OS has reached the limit of it's capabilities. Once they transition to the new OS, I'm confident they'll rebound.
 

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And QNX on the PlayBook is already a step in that direction. I'm not a developer so I don't know how much easier it is to build applications for QNX/BB10
 

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If only you knew what you're talking about...
PlayBook Mobile Responder app puts police tools in a finger-friendly package

The PlayBook may not have taken off in the consumer market, but its enterprise-friendly features may help it find a home elsewhere -- especially now that it's packing a speedy 4G radio. Fresh on the heels of the LTE edition hitting Canadian shores, Intergraph has unveiled its Mobile Responder app that turns RIM's slate into a formidable tool for police and other emergency responders.

[...]

http://www.engadget.com/2012/08/10/playbook-mobile-responder-app/
 

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The issue for RIM is that their current Java-based OS has reached the limit of it's capabilities. Once they transition to the new OS, I'm confident they'll rebound.
But the Playbook OS is the underpinnings of BB10, and right now it's not attracting nearly enough developer interest. If they're not attracting interest now, why would all the developers start building apps for BB10? And if they need BB10 to sell before devs will build for it, then how will they do that when app support is negligible?

They need to bring more devs on board now. This isn't an "if you build it, they will come" scenario. RIM did build it, and they're not really coming. They need to solve that problem, and unless BB10 somehow makes it substantially more attractive to develop for Blackberry than the current Playbook OS, they need to find another way to fix it.
 

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There's a good chance that developers are waiting for the Cascades UI framework before they put too much effort into BB OS2.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Some police enforcement info regarding the PB:

http://crackberry.com/canadian-cops-get-intergraph-mobile-responder-application-blackberry-playbook

Presser info:

PRESS RELEASE

Mobile Responder Application Accelerates Critical, Smarter Decisions

Intergraph® presents the Intergraph Mobile Responder application for the BlackBerry® PlayBookTM tablet at the upcoming Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) Annual Conference in Nova Scotia, Canada. Mobile Responder gives police and emergency responders in the field access to Intergraph's Computer-Aided Dispatch (I/CAD) system from a mobile device. Mobile Responder's rich interface allows the transmission of unit status, dispatch reports, incident updates and emergency requests from a BlackBerry PlayBook.

The Mobile Responder application extends the power of the command center to remote teams and accelerates critical decision-making and incident management in the field. Interfacing with a BlackBerry PlayBook, field officers can access local police databases in real-time, view event details and interact with dispatch centers to provide and receive incident reports.

"Intergraph is very excited about Mobile Responder. It offers the functionality officers need in the field, on the platforms being deployed today," says Mark Patrick, Intergraph's Public Safety Business Development Manager in Canada. "The consistent interface will allow officers to be more efficient, whether deployed in vehicles or on foot."

Officers will also benefit from real-time chat capabilities and location verification from GPS tracking capabilities found in the PlayBook. Mobile Responder fosters public confidence with its secured transmission and storage of data found in BlackBerry devices. Police chiefs, field agents and dispatch officers in attendance at CACP will be able to receive personal demonstrations of the Mobile Responder application on PlayBook by Intergraph experts and representatives from BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion (RIM). In addition, Intergraph will also demonstrate its Computer-Aided Dispatch (I/CAD) system that is integral to Mobile Responder.

Adding to Intergraph's footprint at the CACP show is the exhibition of a police cruiser outfitted by Darta Enterprises, a contracted manufacturer to public safety agencies. A Darta representative will be in the Intergraph booth with the police cruiser, which will have a BlackBerry PlayBook mounted inside, in place of the traditional cruiser notebook computers. This showcases the emergence of new cruisers where officers will be able to work faster and smarter for their communities.

"Utilizing the BlackBerry PlayBook, Intergraph is bringing useful information to the fingertips of law enforcement officers and emergency responders in a fast, convenient, secure and affordable way," said Paolo DeNarda, Senior Business Development Manager, Research In Motion. "This is another great example of how BlackBerry developers are finding new ways to leverage the power of the BlackBerry solution and add significant value for customers."

Intergraph will be exhibiting in booths 225, 227, 324 and 326 at the CACP Annual Conference, which takes place August 19 - 22, 2012, in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Details can be found online at www.cacpconference.ca.

About Intergraph
Intergraph is the leading global provider of engineering and geospatial software that enables customers to visualize complex data. Businesses and governments in more than 60 countries rely on Intergraph's industry-specific software to organize vast amounts of data to make processes and infrastructure better, safer and smarter. The company's software and services empower customers to build and operate more efficient plants and ships, create intelligent maps, and protect critical infrastructure and millions of people around the world.

Intergraph operates through two divisions: Process, Power & Marine (PP&M) and Security, Government & Infrastructure (SG&I). Intergraph PP&M provides enterprise engineering software for the design, construction, operation and data management of plants, ships and offshore facilities. Intergraph SG&I provides geospatially powered solutions including ERDAS technologies to the public safety and security, defense and intelligence, government, transportation, photogrammetry, and utilities and communications industries. Intergraph Government Solutions (IGS) is an independent subsidiary for SG&I's U.S. federal business.

Intergraph is a wholly owned subsidiary of Hexagon AB (Nordic exchange: HEXA B). For more information, visit www.intergraph.com and www.hexagon.com.
 

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The whole thing leaves me going...

"meh".

And then the words of Johnny Mathis/Deneice Williams song from the late 70's come to mind:

Guess it's over
Call it a day
Sorry that it had to end this way
No reason to pretend
We knew it had to end

(Chorus)
Too much too little too late...
 
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