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Discussion Starter #1
RE580D Slow when receiving WiFi from Bell HH2000 & HH2000 Crashing on SpeedTests

Hello, I'm hoping to get some insight and suggestions on how to boost my Wifi in my home. AND stop the Main HH2000 router from crashing

I have a Bell HH2000 and just purchased a TPLink RE580D (AC1900) desktop range extender.

My goal is to get a signal to my basement better than 10Mpbs. (1900 is able to produce better than 10Mbps, correct?)

Router
HH2000 result from - (so not wifi?)
60 Mpbs / 10 Mpbs

MacBook
HH2000 result from - Speedtest.net
50 Mpbs / 10 Mpbs

iPhone
HH2000 results from speed test app
60Mbps / 10 Mbps

MacBook
TPlink results from Speedtest.net
10-20 Mbps / 5Mbps

iPhone
TPlink results from speed test app OOKLA
10-20 Mbps / 1-10 Mbps

NOTE
OOKLA speed test almost ALWAYS crashes the HH2000.

Setup
TP sitting line of sight 8ft from the HH2000, Laptop /iPhone 5ft from the TP link line of sight.

tests numbers based on MANY speedtest average/range.
 

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The TPLink RE580D is probably not what you want. (I looked at the TPLink RE580D web page and the hype was way over the top.) All it will do is retransmit the poor performance of the HH2000. Wireless range extenders typically reduce performance, as seen in the speed test results. That is because the signal is being relayed, consuming half the available bandwidth for retransmission. To avoid that use a wired access point. It could be a dedicated access point or a reconfigured router. If wiring is not possible, one option is to use a pair of tri-band routers or a tri-band mesh system to reduce the bottleneck. That tends to be very expensive. A cheaper option would be to use a pair of powerline adapters and an access point.

It looks like the main issue is with the HH2000. It should not reboot when using Ookla. Those wifi speeds look a little slow for 2.4GHz but not terrible. Speeds for 5GHz should be better, in the 50-300Mbps range depending on the device. Newer devices will typically show better results. Have you tried resetting the HH2000 to defaults and reconfiguring it? If that doesn't work the HH2000 may need to be replaced.

It would be nice to know what band and channel the wifi connections are on and the link speeds reported by the devices. Have you tried a wifi analyzer app to check for interfering signals? What speed does the laptop get when wired directly to the HH2000?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
thanks for the reply,

I could possible run a REALLY long ethernet cable to reach the extender. Perhaps i should try a short one first to see how good the single can be before attempting running the cable all through the house.

Saving that, I was under the impression that the HH2000 had a "good" system, and that i should expect roughly close to my Homes High speed subscription (60Mbps). if my phone and Laptop are getting 50-60Mbps, shouldn't the TPlink?

Is it possible that Bell has put some type of throttle on sharing WiFi with extenders that isn't theirs?

I did speak with Bell, and they did a hard reset of the modem. I'll need to call them back to say I still get drop outs though.

Router
HH2000 result from - (Not wifi)
60 Mpbs / 10 Mpbs

MacBook
HH2000 (2.4 + 5.0) result from - Speedtest.net
40-50 Mpbs / 8-10 Mpbs

iPhone
HH2000 (2.4 / 5.0) results from speed test app
60Mbps / 10 Mbps

MacBook
TPlink (2.4) results from Speedtest.net
10-20 Mbps / 5Mbps

MacBook
TPlink (5.0) results from Speedtest.net ERRORS OUT Often
17-45 Mbps / 8-10 Mbps

iPhone
TPlink (2.4) results from speed test app OOKLA ERRORS OUT Often
10-20 Mbps / 1-10 Mbps

TPlink (5.0) results from speed test app OOKLA ERRORS OUT Often
15-20 Mbps / 0-10 Mbps

usually these errors are obvious as the HH2000 dies too (lights go out and it resets on it own... but not always, sometimes.just a couple lights do nuts (int and wifi) and sometimes not.
 

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Since the subscription speed is 60Mbps, the HH2000 is working correctly. (For some reason I assumed it was faster but it wasn't stated.) In this case, I would not expect a serious loss in speed using the extender but it depends on the way the extender is operating. A good extender would use a dual band connection with the HH2000 to get maximum speed and whatever the devices are capable of from there. It helps to use two devices from the same company but that's sometimes difficult when using an ISP supplied router.

Keep in mind that the extender will only work as fast as the signal it receives from the main router allows and half of it's bandwidth will be lost due to the bandwidth consumed in communication with the HH2000 and other devices simultaneously. With an AC1900 system, there should be little or no degradation in speed with a 60Mbps service. To get the best performance, the extender should be about half way between the dead spot and the HH2000.

I prefer to use a router configured as an extender rather than a dedicated extender. That typically provides the best options and most versatility. Wired is best but wireless will work well as long as the wifi connection between the router and extender is good. Configuring a router as an extender is discussed in existing threads. A good MESH system or pair of MESH enabled routers is also a good option. Does Bell have their MESH devices available in your location?

The HH2000 is a good wifi router. It should be good enough for a 60Mbps plan. A HH3000 would be better but might not be available with that plan. In this case, I'd say the extender is a dud. It's possible that there is some weird interference happening between the HH2000 and the extender due to their close proximity but that should not be happening either. What happens when the distances are more typical of a real world setup? Return the extender if possible and get something better. The HH2000 should not be rebooting so it may need to be reset or replaced. I would get a tech to check the router and internet connection.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the help ExDilbert

well I started off with the router in the same room just to set them up. Afterwords i tried putting the router in a room 15-20 ft away, half way to where I wanted to receive the signal in the basement (back split home). The the best speed I could get down there was 10/3. so I moved it downstairs, under the main router, about 10 ft. I tried all over, at different heights and angles before moving it back to the same room to test with 0 interference.

Anyhow, I'm sending it back. Looks like I'll have a 15% restocking fee :(

Bell does have the Mesh system here. They want $5 a month. I'd rather buy something the rent forever.

Considering the Google Mesh... it's more than I'd like to spend though. any reco's for a Mesh set up?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry, I'm also not sure i understand the Halving of the bandwidth.

So if the HH2000 can out put 60Mpbs on a good day, any extender I get would tap out at 30Mbps?

So if I get a Mesh system, this would be different, provided i connect one of them Wired to the Main Router?


all I want is to have a steady connection in the basement, that can handle more than 10/5 consistently for a PS3.
(not playing any FPS so i don't need a killer connection)
 

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I'm also not sure i understand the Halving of the bandwidth.
It halves the speed of the wifi connection. Let's say the extender has a connection to both the router and device capable of 300Mbps. That would be shared between the router and device giving them each 150Mbps. That's because each packet must be received and transmitted by the extender which takes twice as long. That's the basic theory but there are a lot of variables. If the internet connection is 50Mbps then the repeater would be adequate at 150Mbps. If the internet connection is 500Mbps, it would result in halving the available speed. It's still better than the sub-50Mbps connection that may exist without the extender.

MESH systems provide more transparent wifi roaming and easier administration. At $5/mo I would rent the Bell MESH adapters. I believe they provide four for $5. MESH adapters are overpriced right now so I wouldn't purchase. In addition, AC wifi (AKA Wi-Fi 5) is going to be replaced with AX wifi (AKA Wi-Fi 6 ) at the high end of the market in a couple of years. Not that anyone will really need Wi-Fi 6 right away but it means that AC devices will drop in price and AX devices will provide better speeds and connections. It would cost $120 to rent the Bell MESH adapters for two years vs buying for $200-$400. In two years the wifi market will quite different, and significantly better and/or cheaper equipment will be available.

Alternately, an AC1750 or AC1900 modem could be purchased for about $100-$200 and configured as a repeater or access point. I recommend ASUS routers for this since they have pre-configured settings for repeater and access point use. There are cheaper routers available but they are not as easy to configure.
 
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