Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,778 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If need be please reword the title of this thread.

Ok, Rogers operates up to 900mhz in Ontario and I believe 700 or so out in the Maritimes. But physical coax cable can carry typically up to 2350mhz or 2400mhz. So to me that means there is almost double the capacity available out there frequency wise for Rogers to upgrade to for additional HD and other content, but has not taken advantage of since it will require massive infrastructure upgrades.

Does that make any sense?

Does anyone foresee Rogers expanding the band they use in the future to get more channels?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
Why would they bother. August 2011 there will be plenty of spare capacity on the cable when the analog signals go away... well maybe.
If they manage to avoid translating the incoming digital signals into analog for the last holdouts with old tvs but I suspect the CRTC will not allow that immediately after the switchover.

I wonder how much it costs to use all the capacity of a piece of coax. How much the amplifiers cost if they have to have a flat response upto 2300 Mhz or so. How much effort and truck rolls will be needed to keep the equipment working at thos frequencies...even things like the little splitters having to be replaced.. I fact I wonder if all that might approach the cost of fibre-to-the-curb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,390 Posts
Does that make any sense?
As frequency goes up, so do cable losses. It boils down to an engineering decision about frequency, distance, amplifiers etc. They'll also have to find the necessary equipment, which may require significant changes in their plant. These days, they'd be better off putting their money into fibre. Also, as mentioned in another note, removing analog signals will free up a lot of bandwidth, although not necessarily by next August. That date refers to OTA broadcast and has nothing to do with cable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
"That date refers to OTA broadcast and has nothing to do with cable"

Indeed you are correct JamesK. But in a sensible world that would be that date when the cable and satellite companies were permitted to cease all analog signals if they wished. Even now there is nearly a year to get the Great Canadian Public ready for this and to sell some more new TVs and set top boxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,877 Posts
cable companies will be able to cease analog signals when their digital penetration reches what I believe to be 90%. anyone know what it is right now? isnt it like at 80 or something?

also, the more digital equipment in each household will help the digital penetration numbers too. so if one town has everything analogue, but the next town has everyone on digital, and has at least 2-3 digital STB's in each house hold, that helps the numbers for digital penetration increase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
I guess my point was that in theory the cable Cos could transmit everything digitally and convert to analog at the stb thus giving them more bandwidth on the cable within the 900 or 700 Mhz available with the current plant. This would obviously work except that everyone on cable would have to have a stb. I am sure that some people including the CRTC see that as a problem.

If the digital penetration is over, say, 70% I would think that it would be in Rogers interest to just supply everyone with a basic stb and be done with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,877 Posts
yeah the SD STB does convert the digital signals to analog for the older TV sets. the problem is people were paying for cable dont think they should spend the extra on an STB, some will flat out refuse an STB saying they are perfectly fine with the way it is. Its funny cus for technology to advance, we as humans need to be more willing to "adapt to" new technologies and not hold on to older ones for so long, even though they are reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,390 Posts
and convert to analog at the stb
The STB already does that. The analog signal is for those who just want to connect a TV or VCR to the cable and have it work without anything more. While all my TVs have a STB, my VCR still uses the analog signal, although I think I've only recorded only 1 or 2 shows on it since I got a PVR in Dec. 2008.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
296 Posts
Actually, DOCSIS 2 modems and all Scientific-Atlanta set-top boxes can tune up to 860Mhz, which is the equivalent of cable channel 135. The newer 8640HD box is the only one that can tune up to 1Ghz. I dunno about the Motorola terminals used in atlantic provinces but their limits should be similar.

Rogers already operates to the maximum 860Mhz in Ontario and are using SDV to fit the maximum channels they can. It is expected that on september 1st 2011, cable providers will take the opportunity of OTA analog shutdown to reduce their analog cable offering, eventho these events are not even related to each other.

So, unless there are new standards and the new terminals and modems can tune higher than 1Ghz, there's no reason to upgrade the network beyond that.

Atlantic provinces needs to upgrade from a 750Mhz network to 1Ghz, but with Fiber-To-The-Node (and FTTH) being deployed by competitors, it's more cost-effective for Rogers to deploy fiber closer to the node, smaller nodes, rather than upgrade their amplifiers just to get them removed a few months later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
cable companies will be able to cease analog signals when their digital penetration reches what I believe to be 90%. anyone know what it is right now? isnt it like at 80 or something?
As of December 2009 it was 72%. (The phrase "digital penetration" is an oddly appropriate choice.)

I have two dual-tuner Series 2 TiVo boxes. If I was forced to use a digital box, each TiVo would be reduced to a single tuner when attached to the cable box. I'd be paying more for less.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top