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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a HH300 and a fairly small home (2100 sq ft), and one of the bedrooms is pretty much a dead spot. The HH3000 is installed in the basement. During initial installation the tech installed all 4 pods throughout the house and it was pretty bad. Speed Test showed just 3Mbps in the master. The tech was very young and insisted that plugging a pod right next to the tv (and the Roku Streaming Stick) will solve my problems, but my own understanding is that you need to locate the pod half way between the signal source (router) and the device, otherwise all you get is a great signal from the pod and crap signal to the pod from the router. I unplugged all the pods and that immediately improved the MB speed to 11. A little later I ended up plugging two of the pods in (strategically located) and brought that up to 18 - good enough for me, but recently we found that the spare bedroom (which was converted to a home office) is a dead spot. Reading up on the matter I found that the pods form a WiFi mesh, which is not exactly like simple wifi extenders. So maybe my lack of understanding resulted in a sub optimum situation.

A few questions:

1. Should I plug the other two pods in (thinking of putting one on the main floor below the dead spot room and the last one in the hallway outside the room). Is there risk that interference between the extra access points will make matters worse (as appeared to be the case after the initial installation)?

2. Will they automatically be configured when I plug them in or do I really have to run their WiFi app? The problem I have with that app is that my wireless printer has problems when both the 2.4 and 5 GHz networks use the same SSID (took me 6 months and 2 printers to figure this out). Every time you run the app it changes the router back to a single SSID.

3. I suppose I could run the app, then log in to the router and reconfigure it for two separate SSIDs (would have to re-install the app and figure out again how to re-configure things; it's far from intuitive). Will this manual re-configuration screw up whatever configuration the app performs on the pods?

4. Should I, instead, just buy my own router and configure the HH3000 in bypass mode to use the external router? Or is the router part of the HH3000 good enough for a small home, and I'm unlikely to get any improvements from getting a better router?
 

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How long ago was your installation? Ideally you should install ANY modem in the most central part of your house, so if you are mostly on the main floor or second level (bedrooms) then you should have the modem on your main floor perhaps. having it in your basement will make it harder for the signal to penetrate upstairs, but will also make it hard for the pods to re-transmit. basically they will be re-transmitting a poor signal so hence the slow speed. see if you can have it moved if possible ,call your internet company and ask for a re-location
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Original installation was summer of 2018; I just finished my 2 year bundle contract and dropped to internet-only. I'm in a somewhat unique situation where none of the third party re-sellers have agreements in place with either Rogers or Bell, so I can't get a discounted service with, say, TekSavvy. Additionally, both Bell and Rogers have FTTH but the Rogers fibre broke off from the connector that plugs into the modem (happened during basement reno) and, because of Covid-19, Rogers won't send a tech for any in-home repairs. So I'm literally stuck with Bell, for the time being.

Since the fibre comes into the home in the basement, that's where the modem is located. I did not want to have to drill holes in the nice hardwood flooring we had installed; I assumed that reach would not be a big issue in a small home. I was wrong. The PVR often lost the video signal, even with some additional h/w they installed on the main floor (plugs into a phone wall outlet -- not really sure exactly what it was but I assume some kind of repeater for the video network signal).

Speed Test results in the basement were (as expected) great; same on the main floor. Master Bedroom on the second floor is on the other side of the house from where the router is located in the basement, but I'm still getting 18Mbps, mostly without any issues. So it's strange that the spare bedroom -- which is located closer to the router -- is a dead spot. Of course I don't really know the layout of the various ducts and pipes so that could play a hand.

Bottom line, before buying a fancy-shmancy router, would it be worth trying plugging more of the pods in and, if so, do I really need to run the wifi app or will they configure automatically? I honestly don't see this app as being very useful -- all it does (seemingly) is show me a cute graphic of the relative location of the HH300, pods and connected devices, but does not allow me to do any targetted configuration; it does, however, re-configure the network to a single SSID, which screws up my printer.
 

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1. I would put a pod directly above the router (in the closest outlet) on the first floor. Do the same for the second floor. Then I would place pods half way to any dead spots or distant rooms. If the router is at one end of the basement, 2 pods at 1/3 and 2/3 the length of the house on the main floor may be required. Do not place the pods near potential interference sources such as TVs and computers or large metal objects such as appliances.

2. They should automatically reconfigure.

3. I wouldn't change the router setup for now.

4. That may work better if the router can be wired at a central location on the main floor and it is a very good model. The pods may not work with a different router so I would hold off on that for now. The main limitation with most wifi connected mesh pods or repeaters is that they tend to limit maximum speeds. A centrally located, wired access point can overcome that. A tri-band wireless repeater or mesh system will also provide higher speeds but they are expensive.

a fairly small home (2100 sq ft)
I thought that was a big home. My idea of small is 1000 sq ft. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
1. I would put a pod directly above the router (in the closest outlet) on the first floor. Do the same for the second floor. Then I would place pods half way to any dead spots or distant rooms. If the router is at one end of the basement, 2 pods at 1/3 and 2/3 the length of the house on the main floor may be required. Do not place the pods near potential interference sources such as TVs and computers or large metal objects such as appliances.

2. They should automatically reconfigure.

3. I wouldn't change the router setup for now.

4. That may work better if the router can be wired at a central location on the main floor and it is a very good model. The pods may not work with a different router so I would hold off on that for now. The main limitation with most wifi connected mesh pods or repeaters is that they tend to limit maximum speeds. A centrally located, wired access point can overcome that. A tri-band wireless repeater or mesh system will also provide higher speeds but they are expensive.


I thought that was a big home. My idea of small is 1000 sq ft. :)
We have 4 kids (although one was at McGill when we first moved; he's back now but his two sisters are now also McGillians). Anyhow, with 4, we lived in a 3200 sq ft home at one point -- hence 2100 is "small".
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Success! I only had a pod on the second floor, in the hallway near bedroom 3 which is just 10ft from bedroom 4 (the dead spot). I plugged another one in in the dining room on the main floor, roughly above the router. This improved the speed test results from 3-4 to around 8. Then I moved the 2nd floor pod right to bedroom 4 and now I'm getting 15+. I checked bedroom 3 and it's roughly unchanged.

Here's the weird part - the master, which is down another hallway, which is perpendicular to the first one (so it's on the opposite side of the house relative to the router) is still getting 30+ (in fact it may be better than I was getting when the 2nd floor pod was closer to the master).

I also added a pod right next to the front door; this gives me about 6Mbps in the driveway (for those times when I'm already in the car waiting for whomever in driving wherever). And even without adding a pod on the breakfast nook I'm still getting decent reception in the backyard.

Last weird thing I noticed, even when download speeds were very poor (as I was moving pods around), the upload speeds were actually very good to excellent. I don't understand that at all.
 

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now a days, with the roll out of fiber optics, people should really consider some kind of smart wiring schematic for their home. Back in the day we only cared where the TV was placed, but now the internet is a big part of our daily lives, we often just accept the most mediocre location of our modem without thinking of its potential impact on us. We now rely more than ever on internet including working from home now. So its very important to have a stable and solid internet connection, not just that, but having good blanket wifi coverage is important, as well as even considering having ethernet drops in your house to rooms that need it the most, even if it means paying out of pocket to add that functionality to our home

I was getting piss poor wifi coverage in my basement office, and didnt think much about it, and mentioned it to my local IT guy. He came by a week later, did an assessment and recommended a hardwired Ethernet drop from my modem to my basement office. I agreed and paid him for that. I connected my computer up to the Ethernet drop and Voila, what a big difference, then a week later, we all got the bad news about Covid-19 and the Lockdown and I was told to work from home indefinitely. So far Its been great, not a single problem with my connectivity.

As for drilling fibre thru your hard wood floors, they can run the fiber wire from outside your house along the bricks into the 2nd story of your house and install the modem there, yeah its not as aesthetically pleasing but if you want a high quality installation where the wires are fished neatly into the wall and hidden, then unfortunately, you gotta pony up some $$$ from a contractor, or live with wires along the baseboards or thru your hard wood floors, etc
 
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