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Yes it is, I'm using to act as a bridge to a switch downstairs that has my HTPC, 360, PS3 and television connected to it.
 

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I have a follow up question... if I use a Powerline Adapter in a condo building, how secure is the connection?
 

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Have been using Dlink 301 for over a year. REALLY easy to set up and configure. Just need to run the admin program once to give the units a name. They connect to each other without effort. Not sure anyone should care about the encryption, perhaps in an apartment building, not required in a house. Units overheat. Had to exchange 3 pairs, at least one of each pair dying within 2 months. This happened even though unplugged as much as possible. So keep your bill handy for returns. Took the covers completely off to keep them cool, that has increased the lifespan.
They also don't work well through a UPS, so can't protect them from power surges.
 

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I had the D-Link DHP-301 Powerline connectors, and they failed on me as well after about 4 months. They would really overheat, and then the throughput rates on them dropped. I tried a different outlet, and while the throughput rate on them increased for a little while, it dropped back down again quickly.

So I exchanged them via D-Link. They sent me a new sealed box which I haven't opened yet.

I'm not sure if these new models are any better, perhaps someone can post a review soon.

But I was using the DHP-301 connectors to connect my SlingCatcher to my SlingBox, but then I went with a wireless gaming bridge by D-Link and connected that to my SlingCatcher. The performance with the bridge has been much better than the D-Link Powerline connectors. Now I truly have a wireless solution when placeshifting my cable box / DVD source from one TV to another TV!
 

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Good feedback guys. Three consecutive posters having problems with heat and premature failure certainly would make me wonder if this gear is ready for primetime.
 

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I went with the ZyXEL's specifically because they were supposed to be of higher quality. Only had them for a couple weeks but they're barely above room temperature when touched.
 

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I am looking into these devices. There are 85 Mbps and 200 Mbps units. The latter is limited by the 100 Mbps Ethernet port of the router. So, does it make more sense to get the 85 Mbps units which are way cheaper?
 

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That depends if the 85 Mbps units actually deliver the full rated speed. RF networking units often advertise the theoretical maximum speed under ideal conditions. Actual speeds can be much lower.
 

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So, does it mean if I get the 200 Mbps unit, I'll for sure get 100 Mps which is the limit of ethernet on my router? If so, it makes sense to pay the price?
 

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I have heard several people mention that the new D-Link DHP-303 units run a lot cooler than the DHP-301s did - and they seem to offer higher speed than most kits from reviews I've read as well.
 

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e268, you've got a false assumption there...

Those Powerline speeds are maximum rates (i.e. "up to 200 Mbps"), not guaranteed rates...and it's a theoretical maximum (as in, that's the most they'll do, given optimum environment and circumstances). Neither maximum speed (200Mbps nor 85Mbps) would really be seen.

Myself, I'd go with the 200Mbps. Actually, that's what I've done--the Belkin Powerline AV Starter Kit--and they work great. Powerline setup is generally quite simple, but the Belkin setup was dead simple (nothing to setup on the PC; just plug 'em in, and then press the buttons to reset the encryption).

Another nice feature of the Belkins is that you aren't forced to have the whole unit hanging from the wall plug. Included in the box is two backplates per adaptor:
- backplate to plug straight into the wall socket
- backplate to an extension cord that plugs into the wall

Returning to the topic at hand (speed), here's the blurb on the box about operating range ("Up to300m in wall powerlines") and speed ("Up to 200Mbps"):
NOTE: The standard transmission rate--200Mbps--is the ideal physical data rate. Actual data throughput and distance will be lower, depending on interference, network traffic, building materials, and other condictions.
Your 100Mbps router likely won't be limiting the speed of Powerline AV communication to a significant degree, if at all. In addition, 85Mbps wouldn't be seen from 85Mbps units. Combine the two, and the difference in speed should be higher than the 15Mbps apparent at a cursory glance.

I can't guarantee what speed you would get, nor can I say whether the speed difference is worth it to you. Just trying to get the parameters of the question off the maximum numbers since those aren't really seen.

Anyway, I've rambled on long enough. Hope that helps.
 
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