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Discussion Starter #1
I had recorded some movies on a Pioneer DVR (sorry I don't know the model #) and they will not play on my Samsung Blu-Ray BD-UP5000 even though it says multi format.

These DVDs will however play on my laptop using Cyberlink PowerDVD DX 7.0 software.

Is there a way that I can get them to play on the Blu-ray?
 

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Not Enough Info

It's always a good idea to read the manual that comes with your device.

By "DVR" I assume that you mean a DVD recorder. The easy question: Did you FINALIZE the disks? Note that if you look at the packaging on a store purchased SD DVD, you will see that it is a DVD-Video disk. When you finalize a DVD which you have recorded using a DVD recorder, you will see an option of finalizing it as a DVD-Video disk. If you did so, then it will play on anything (PAL/NTSC issues may still be present).

Most DVD recorders require that finalizing be done on the same machine that did the recording.

If this is the source of your problem, then a solution is to copy the disk to a file on your PC, then burn it again and make it a DVD-Vdeo during the burning.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I remember that I did "finalize" all of the movies that I recorded, I just don't remember the model# of the Pioneer DVR.

As you suggested, I copied the DVD to my desktop and tried to burn a new DVD using NTI media maker, but the type of video file seems to be an IFO file and even at that it is only showing a file size of 82kb instead of the 4.27G that the actual movie is? and NTI will not let me drag & drop to the pane where I could then select BURN.

What I am having a hard time understanding is that XP will let me view the movie, yet I don't seem to be able to copy or burn it to a blank dvd?

I seem to be over my head here and would definitely appreciate some expert guidance.
 

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You should specify what the original disk type is. DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RAM, etc. Some program sources and disk types allow you to copy the program only once. (For example, I wanted to send of copy of a program to a friend via the mail and it was recorded on a DVD-RAM. This person said that she couldn't play a DVD-RAM and my recorders would not allow me to copy it and reburn it to a DVD-Video as DVD-RAM supports a copy-once function. So I had to play it and use the analogue outputs as the source for input to another DVD recorder.)

Secondly, search for a program called "DVD Decrypter". The MPAA didn't like this free program and the original website was taken over by Macrovision. However, it might still be floating around on the net somewhere. This program is designed to ease the copying of SD DVDs. There may be newer programs that do the same thing. AnyDVD, for example.

Another possibility is "dye fade", or maybe "laser fade". Consumer-purchased blank DVDs function because when burned by a low power laser, the dye embedded in the disk changes colour. If the dye fades, then you have nothing. Nowadays, name brands of disks are not likely to manifest this problem. Cheap brands of blank DVDs may be at risk of this phenomenon. WRT playback, I have had an LG DVD recorder fail to recognize a disk, but a Pioneer plays it just fine. I think the LG is just made cheaply. Sometimes I have used a compressed air spray on the innards of the LG and it plays better afterwards. Either dust was partially obscuring the laser or else the air lowered the operating temperature.
 

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> I hate to ask the obvious but does the Samsung support only either DVD-R or DVD+R? The website doesn't indicate so.

I would be surprised if any BR-D player couldn't read DVD+/-R(W) discs. If it didn't, the company who sells it deserves to go out of business!


> When you finalize a DVD which you have recorded using a DVD recorder, you will see an option of finalizing it as a DVD-Video disk.

The disc may have been formatted as a DVD-VR, in which case, it is not very compatible.



> but the type of video file seems to be an IFO file and even at that it is only showing a file size of 82kb instead of the 4.27G that the actual movie is

IFO files just contain an index of the DVD + commands for the DVD player. The actual content of the video/audio is in the VOB files.


Put the disc in your computer, then go to Windows Explorer, and give us a list of the files on the disc. This will help in determining what kind of disc it is, exactly.

A typical DVD-Video generally contains:
AUDIO_TS (optional) and VIDEO_TS directories;
BUF, IFO, and VOB files within the VIDEO_TS directory.
 
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