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well i see all the posts on dvb and using your pc as a receiver and wanted to do this with mine.

I have an ati 9800 pro all in wonder with tv in and out and was wondering first is there a way i could use this card as a DVB receiver card instead of buying one of the ones on the market and if so any type of programs i can use for it.

secopndly if i can not which would eb the best card to use to do this :)

i am also looking for a how to guide as i have been reading and researching but never really see a how to on using your pc as a FTA receiver.

thanx for the help and ideas and keep up the great wrok :cool:
 

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I dno't know what card you are talking about, but a common NTSC analog tuner card cannot tune DVB-S.

You can though, get DVB-S PCI satelllite tuner cards you can use to receive DVB satellite transmissions on your PC.
 

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I use a TwinHan VP1020a. I bought it from a BC company for around $100 Canadian.
Just connect a satellite dish and you're in business.
I have mine slaved to my C band receiver to receive High Definition sports feeds (free and legal).
Note that this card is popular with hackers, although it wont be for much longer. That is not what I use it for, and I will not answer any questions on how to use it for hacking - I don't know.

It is an awesome card and works great. I can also record right to my hard drive from the card.
 

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Using a pc for fta is actually one of your best options! You can set it up as a PVR allowing you to pause rewind record live tv. Also allows you to apply filters to improve your percieved picture quality. Id say give it a go if you've got the pc already all you need is the card and a dish
 

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While the Hauppage Nexus is much more money, in addition to the MPEG hardware decoding, it gives you an on board composite video out for a direct tv connection and the real big plus, a coaxial digital audio output.
 

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"...direct tv connection and...digital audio output..."

So, ah, you can "use your PC" to watch satellite TV, but on your home theatre system (TV and audio), "using the PC" to hold the card upright and supply power...?

Why not simply purchase the $100 TwinHan card for the PC, ~and~ also purchase a stand-alone very nice $200 FTA receiver ('Lifetime Ultra', with the digital audio output) for the home theatre. The total price for both would be about the same as the $300 Nexus.
 

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The Nexus has only composite video output (not even VHS) and you can only watch TV from it - i.e. you don't see the desktop and can't use the TV as a monitor. You'll need a second monitor to start the TV app. I don't recommend it for any purpose. It was good 4 years ago when computers were much less powerful than today, but now it's not worth.
 

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you can only watch TV from it - i.e. you don't see the desktop and can't use the TV as a monitor.
It doesn't output the image thru the desktop? :eek:
If so, it's not good at all.
Why not simply purchase the $100 TwinHan card for the PC, ~and~ also purchase a stand-alone very nice $200 FTA receiver
Hardware based cards use less processor power which probably not a issue with SD, but is with HD. I have the MyHD120 HD tuner card that is 2x+ the price of HD software cards.
 

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It of course outputs the image through the desktop. But I dont think most people would like to gather around the computer monitor to watch TV. A lot of people dont have pc's with TV-OUTS on their video card. You can make use of the TV Out if you have a higher end card, but then you are using Software decoding as opposed to the Hardware decoding if it is built right into the DVB card.

That is perfectly fine if the pc is basically being used almost in a dedicated mode while watching tv, but will be too taxing if you want to do a lot a multitasking. (ie running somekind of home automation and or music server stuff at the same time)

Also, have you ever amplified analog stereo from the audio outputs of a pc sound card in a home theatre setting. Chances are that 9 times out of 10 the background hiss and humm is so disagreable it ruins the whole experience. Most peoples sound cards are very poor for home theatre type setups.

Remember that any DVB card can easily turn a pc into a FTA receiver. You just have to decide what features are more important to you and try to fit it in the budget you want to work with.
 

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I think there are about 4. Unfortunately, all but the one PBS I think require a large C-BAND dish.

Lots of standard def free stuff you can get with a minimum 30" dish and KU linear LNB. Old Exvu lnbs (pre-Nimiq) work for this.

Intelsat Americas 5 (formerly Telstar 5) at 97 West Long. has the bulk of the free to air channels most frequently tuned in. There are literally dozens of free Arabic and Farsi (Iranian) channels on there to name a few.

You have to check lyngsat.com

Once you get the hang of it, you can find out whatever you want to know about available sats, transponders and frequencies.
 

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USB 2 DVB-s receiver

For use with a laptop or a computer which won't take standard PCI cards (an Opteron server), I am considering the Twinhan StarBox.
Needless to say, I think I'll have sufficient horsepower.
It uses USB 2.0 to bring the transport stream into your computer.
It's listed on Twinhan dot com web site, and sold on Sadoun dot com.
(the Twinhan site lists several north american dealers)

Anyone have any experience with this unit?
It seems modestly priced, and is easily movable from one computer to another.
 

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I am thinking about adding a Twinhan 102G satellite tuner PCI card to my PC. I would like to watch Ku-band programming but the card's tuning range is 950-2150 MHz, far below Ku-band 11000+MHz broadcast frequencies. Do I need to buy some sort of down-converter or does the LNB handle this? Is this card even meant to be used with Ku-band, or is it actually meant for C-band or something else?
 

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Yes, the Ku band satellites are around 12ghz.
The LNB downconverts into the 950-2150 mhz range.
So, that lower frequency, is the signal which is carried by the cable from your antenna to your receiver.

When you see an 8 to 12 foot dish in someone's yard, they are probably watching C band.
That's somewhere around the 3.5ghz to 4ghz range.
Their LNB downconverts into the same range as above.
 

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"KWorld DVBS100 Digital Satellite Receiver Card

I am new to this so , I have just perchased a "KWorld DVBS100 Digital Satellite Receiver Card and wanted to know if this is a good card or not, does anyone know the card??

Fred
"
 

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Kworld DVB-S card

Yea, ran some tests with the kworld card a few months ago.
It takes a LOT of horsepower to get it to run properly.
I've not had a chance to play with the Twinhan cards, so I can't say if they're similar on horsepower usage or not.
I did get the USB unit described above, and it has quite a bit of on-board processing power.

I don't recall the actual numbers, but I could get the USB box to work on my celeron 1500 laptop (little P4) pretty well.
The Kworld wasn't stable on an AMD box with twice that horsepower.
It looked like it might work on a dual core AMD, though.
As for running one on a P4, I wouldn't expect success on anything under 3ghz, and maybe not even then.

Your mileage may vary.
 
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