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Thank you very much for your response.

I opened my Pansat 9200 HD today and I found out that I do not have this board.
I checked the price DVB-S2 prem kit, it is too expensive almost $ 150.00 and I also checked the price of Limesat PVR and it is $ 180.00.

Majortom

Please tell me which is better. Can I watch PBS Montana in Limesat PVR?

Regards.
 

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Puppo, I've never heard of a Limesat PVR, would have to research it myself.
The $150 u quoted for the add on board, if it includes shipping doesn't sound too far off for the legit board.
Although I agree, if I were in your situation, probably a little steep to make me wanna bite.
Hindsight is 20-20, might have been a little cheaper if it came with the receiver at the time ya bought it?

Edit: Of course I had to Google the Limesat thing. Every search hit took me to a hacking site,
so I highly doubt it's designed to receive legit 8PSK DVB-S2 FTA signals.
If it were me, I'd stay away from it and get the real deal.
 

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Majortom,

Thank you very much for your reply.
I checked Limesat PVR and I found out that it is not even HD reciever.

Regards.

Thanks
 

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Well, I finally got my hands on a receiver that will decode DVB-S2 signals — sold under the name SatHawk PVR800 but also known by other brand names like Solomend and Openbox.
(I might write up a review of the device later, in a more appropriate part of of the forum.)
Just a reminder that I am using a round dish (measured diameter of 90 cm) and a linear LNB.
It receives OETA and OKLA most easily of the three DVB-S2 stations (80-90% strength; 30-60% quality).
LPBS stations come in second (80-90% strength; 0-30% quality).
Last is Montana PBS, which I can't even receive at the moment. Earlier today, it was clocking in with results similar to LPBS.
Too bad Montana PBS is so tough to receive — I have a soft spot for it for geographical reasons.

EDIT: To add, OETA is registering stable signal quality around 70-75%. Also, I neglected to add that LPBS's signal will drop low enough to cause visible trouble on the TV — pixelations and no picture altogether. Montana PBS is still out.
 

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EDIT: To add, OETA is registering stable signal quality around 70-75%. Also, I neglected to add that LPBS's signal will drop low enough to cause visible trouble on the TV — pixelations and no picture altogether. Montana PBS is still out.
Yeah LPBS is definitely a strange one. I still get decent quality and intermittent
Continuity errors. Montana PBS is a touchy one because of the low symbol rate
I think. But once it locks in, is OK for me.
 

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I doubt it. had to google it. looks that's a couple years old.
and if it was dvb-s2 capable, you can bet it would say so in it's specs.
which it doesn't. least not where google took me.
 

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Through no apparent action of my own, my reception of Montana PBS is the best it's been since I got my DVB-S2 receiver, currently clocking in at 85% intensity and 74% quality. Meanwhile, OETA is clocking in with 30%-70% quality and LPB is lower still.
This is leading me to wonder if my dish is slowly drifting …
 

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Nah, as long as it's peaked in Azimuth, Elevation, and skew, it should be fine.
That's been one flakey satellite. What size is the dish again? What type of LNB.
LNB, LNBF, or what? One thing i do when I see stuff "i can't explain" is inspect
all my coax fittings, etc.
 

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Downbeat, you are confirming my suspicions about AMC 21. I believe that the footprint is not as advertised and there is significant difference in field strength between transponders, possibly due to transmitter dish aiming.

At my location, 122.9°W 49.2°N, transponders 12150 to 12180 MHz come in strongest on a 30" dish. In Calgary, you can receive Montana PBS and presumably PBS East & West HD on a dish slightly larger. I get none of these. PBS HD can sometimes register 10%. I have a Pansat 9200 HD with Pansat DVB-S2 module.

I emailed SES who own the satellite. They initially replied, but when they found I was just a piddling private viewer instead of some distribution system, they didn't reply further. Possibly the only way I can receive all the transponders on this satellite is a 1.8 metre (6') dish, which is sad. This is an option I am exploring....
 

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Possibly the only way I can receive all the transponders on this satellite is a 1.8 metre (6') dish, which is sad. This is an option I am exploring....
My antenna is 7.5' and trust me there are times I wish I had kept the larger dish I once had (Once had a 12'). I would go with the largest antenna my property/space can support. Never mind what the wife thinks.
Ya won't regret it.

About the only way I could hope to improve my existing setup further, would be to replace the old Co-Rotor II C/Ku feed + LNBs with newer C and Ku band LNBFs. After that the most improvement for me would be installing a larger antenna. But I'm still pretty happy with it the way it is now, so staying put for now.

On a side note, it's just the way it is, DVB-S2 8PSK signals are just harder to pull in. Everything has to be spot on. And even then ya may still struggle. After all, you don't think these signals are meant for little 90 cm dishes do ya? I'd be surprised if there was even one broadcaster out there pulling in their own network feeds via a 90 cm antenna. If ya want reliable 8PSK reception across all birds, all transponders, all the time, I think ya have to upgrade your antennas, etc.
 

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I wish I could put up a larger dish but for the moment, 90 cm is sadly as big as my situation will allow. ;)
Oh, and I'm back to "normal" reception levels now.
 

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Majortom, thanks for your feedback.

On my Pansat 9200 HD, I was wondering if the DVB-S2 board was working as I hadn't managed to detect any. Well, I found that the hokey connector cable that comes with the board had the centre pin bent over and so wasn't feeding the signal to the DVB-S2 board.

After putting on a cable with screw on F-connectors, I scanned again. This time transponder 11980 MHz, Claro DVB-S2, was captured. Now I have the EPG for these channels, but can't watch as they are Nagravision 2. (I thought that Nagravision 2 had been compromised and everyone moved to Nagravision 3.) But, didn't detect any PBS DVB-S2 channels.

I just wish that SES (satellite owner) put valid field strength and footprint information on their website instead of what appears to be theoretical field strength in my case. Then we would all know where we were trying to receive this satellite.
 

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Rick, et al.
Did you guys mention the type of LNBF you're using with your small antennas?
A high quality LNBF can also make all the difference in the world. Especially if it's an older model, several years old. After your dish size (Antenna gain) & Alignment, your next shot for improvement would be the overall system Noise Figure Of your system, in which the LNBF would play an important role.

At least that's how I see it. Glad to hear you at least know it's functioning now.
I think that Claro Mux is a fairly new provider meant for Carribean? All Spanish stuff ya can tell that much.
 

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Majortom, the LNB I am using has a 0.3dB noise figure. The Claro network EPG on the one transponder are mostly in English. If you check out Lyngsat packages for Claro, it carries many of the channels that Dish Network does.

As mentioned in an earlier post, my belief is that the footprint info for AMC-21 is not correct and I have just written by snail mail to SES about this. I will post their reply when I get it.

I believe my set-up to be OK as I can receive all Ku band transponders on another satellite, SES-1 at 101°W, without problem and all are similar quality level. It seems like both my local satellites, Galaxy 18 at 123°W and AMC-12 at 125°W, are more difficult to pull in. If you think of the beam from SES-1 at 101°W, it will be broader and easier to align as its longitude position is over the Conus. Galaxy 18 and AMC-12 are more side shooting and require more critical alignment to centre the footprint correctly. If the western edge of the footprint is not where it should be, the EIRP will fall off rapidly which is my belief as to what is happening.
 

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My antenna is 7.5' and trust me there are times I wish I had kept the larger dish I once had (Once had a 12'). I would go with the largest antenna my property/space can support. Never mind what the wife thinks.
Ya won't regret it.

About the only way I could hope to improve my existing setup further, would be to replace the old Co-Rotor II C/Ku feed + LNBs with newer C and Ku band LNBFs. After that the most improvement for me would be installing a larger antenna. But I'm still pretty happy with it the way it is now, so staying put for now.

On a side note, it's just the way it is, DVB-S2 8PSK signals are just harder to pull in. Everything has to be spot on. And even then ya may still struggle. After all, you don't think these signals are meant for little 90 cm dishes do ya? I'd be surprised if there was even one broadcaster out there pulling in their own network feeds via a 90 cm antenna. If ya want reliable 8PSK reception across all birds, all transponders, all the time, I think ya have to upgrade your antennas, etc.
Do you have a solid or mesh dish? Reception of Ku Band on a mesh dish can be quite challenging sometimes depending on the size of the holes in your mesh. This is due to the fact that mesh dishes with large holes don't reflect the higher frequencies of Ku band properly. Because of this, you might get better results with a well tuned solid offset dish of at least 90cm in size dedicated for Ku band.
 
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