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Generally the common, affordable consumer level units don't do both satellite and OTA because the frequency ranges are so different. Also most of the cheaper satellite ones are just listening for a tone rather than doing an actual signal level reading.

Some models do satellite/cable/OTA but you have to really be careful to read the specs before buying one to confirm exactly what it does.

Of course money is an issue too, and some pros pay in the many thousands of dollars for top quality signal analyzers when many OTA users just want a pocket device that is simple to operate and inexpensive.
 

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They have an ATSC model. Not sure how it works though -- if it's a broadband power meter, how do you know which channel you are focussing on? Perhaps this works in Europe, where most local broadcasts are from the same tower.
 

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A normal satellite meter will not work for ota signal different frequency.

The link for that meter that was posted here looking on the picture I would not waste my money on that, I don't see where a user could select a specific channel for tuning.

Best to use the tv built in meter.

Good luck.
 

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Using the TV's meter is not always an option: imagine being up at the top of a 40 foot tower swinging a huge VHF/FM/UHF combo antenna around to get it peaked. In the past I've done this with a 13" TV down on the ground being fed by an ATSC STB set on its power meter, and way up top was me with a set of binoculars! :D

A handy pocket "peaker" with real-time station PSIP info on screen would be terrific. I would not want to be hauling an expensive pro signal analyzer up there without insurance on it!
 

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Using the TV's meter is not always an option: imagine being up at the top of a 40 foot tower swinging a huge VHF/FM/UHF combo antenna around to get it peaked. In the past I've done this with a 13" TV down on the ground being fed by an ATSC STB set on its power meter, and way up top was me with a set of binoculars! :D

A handy pocket "peaker" with real-time station PSIP info on screen would be terrific. I would not want to be hauling an expensive pro signal analyzer up there without insurance on it!
2-way radio and an extra pair of eyes and a lot of yelling.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
2-way radio and an extra pair of eyes and a lot of yelling
I'm probably a bit older than you guys....so I'll be using 2 empty tin cans and a taught piece of string to communicate !:)
 

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Post #3 and #13:

Only drawback I see with this is that how do you know which station you have locked in on! I find that there are spots where one station comes in stronger than the others but what i want to find is a happy medium where all the stations come in so i don't have to keep moving the antenna - this is not necessarily where the signal is the strongest, especially when you are searching for a signal that is bouncing around in an area that is not direct line-of-sight.
 

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Project Idea: DIY OTA Antenna Lab & testing tools

Wish I could help out there - I work in the electronics industry but the closest equipment I have at my disposal is a signal generator and a spectrum analyzer. Too bad I'm not at my previous employer, where we had antenna rigs, a microwave network analyzer, and other nice goodies :) Yaamon did you find someone to test these out?
 

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Me too - I used to be able to waltz into the lab where I worked and check out the RF and anechoic chambers. :) Anyone here have lab access to gear like we've mentioned?

No matter, some real world tests will be great!
 

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Yeah, it wouldn't be that hard to test things out.

Just need a tuner with a signal-strength readout, a high quality A-B switch, a variable attenuator (to find the "cliff"), and then some smaller antenuators to trim one antenna versus the other.

All of that stuff is in my RF "junk" box. :)

One also needs some suitable signal sources across the band -- transmitters at high, mid, and low UHF to compare with, plus some high VHF perhaps.

Those can be analog or digital -- makes no difference to the antenna.

Cheers
 
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