Canadian TV, Computing and Home Theatre Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
Last night I had some friends over and we plugged in an ipod into the front Auxiliary port to listen to some music. My friend noticed that we had to crank the volume upto 50 to get a good sound.
Was the volume on the iPod turned up? When I similarly hook up my Zune to my receiver (that is, from its headphone jack to the aux. input - or split to a L+R analogue input - on my receiver), I usually turn its volume up to ~16 (out of 20), which roughly matches the input levels of my other devices.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
If 50 (out of 80) was the level you were using for all components attached to your receiver, then there clearly isn't an issue with the auxiliary input or with your receiver. It just means that 50 is approximately the volume level you need for "good sound" in your relatively large room.

Boosting the channel levels so that the display shows a lower volume number doesn't actually "solve" anything, particularly since there doesn't appear to be any "problem" to solve.

My suggestion: Use Audyssey to calibrate your system and, aside from doing a bit of tweaking - say, to level-match certain speakers against each other - leave the settings alone.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
After running Audyssey, it may happen that you find one channel sounds softer or louder than another. For example, your center channel might sound muted compared with your main speakers. In this case, you would bump your center channel level up one or two dB to match the level of your mains.

For accuracy, it's best done using a sound pressure level (SPL) meter...



...but, if you don't have one, you can level-matching by ear.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
When you say "run" the Audessy, is their a procdure that I have to follow? All I noticed was Auddessy EQ on/off.
Plug the microphone that came with the receiver into the microphone jack, crack open the manual and follow the instructions on how to run the Audyssey auto-calibration program. Once it's all done, you store the results and then apply them (Audyssey EQ on) or not (Audyssey EQ off).

You should also be able to review the various settings (speaker size, distance and level, etc.) and adjust them as required...*if* required. (This is where the bit about "level matching" comes into play.)
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
Actually, never mind the whole microphone thing. :) I just checked the manual and apparently that receiver doesn't come with Audyssey's auto-calibration program. It seems to come with some sort of pre-loaded, adjustable settings.

So, basically, it's back to adjusting the levels using your ears (or an SPL meter) and an audio source. If there's a built-in tone generator, you can run that; else, you can use the "THX Optimizer" option found on a number of DVDs (Pixar and Disney movies tend to have it) or you can buy a calibration disc such as "Digital Video Essentials (DVE)" and use the test tones provided on it.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
... if I do decide to get a meter, what volume would be a good reference?
It's been a while, but I believe you would simply set the receiver volume to your normal listening level (which seems to be around 50 out of 80), then go into the audio menu and, using the audio source and the SPL meter, adjust the individual channel levels, one at a time, so that they all register ~75dB on the meter.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
I meant to add this earlier, but I didn't have time, so here goes:

If you're adjusting levels by ear, without an SPL meter, set the receiver volume to your normal listening level, then go into the audio menu to adjust the individual levels. Start with the main speakers. Check the left and right levels individually, then play something in stereo. If the audio sounds like it's properly "centered" in the front soundstage, the levels are probably closely matched. From there, test the center channel and then the surrounds, and match them to the level of the mains.

When testing the subwoofer, keep in mind that you will have to turn it up louder than necessary for a test tone to sound roughly as loud as it does on regular speakers, which means it will likely be too loud for regular listening (i.e., a bass- or LFE-heavy movie or audio track). In that case, adjust it until it sounds roughly comparable, then dial it back a few dB. Then test with a movie track and adjust the subwoofer level up or down as desired until it seems more properly balanced with the rest of the speakers.

(If it's too soft, you won't be satisfied with how the sub "pounds"; if it's too loud, it may sound boomy or the bass may be otherwise exaggerate or out-of-balance with the rest of the speakers.)

That's how I'd do it, anyway. :p
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,578 Posts
Hi Marc,

I don't think the HT-S3300 has a built in sound utility, if it does I don't see it in the manual. Can you point me in the right direction if you know where to find it?
I think Marc may be under the same mistaken impression that 57 and I were, earlier on, regarding what "Audyssey" means with respect to your HTiB (vs. what it normally means - namely, a built-in, auto-calibration function w/ microphone).
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top