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Update, just in case anyone miseed it: CHCH came back in Ottawa-Gatineau, between 09:30 and 19:00. It's still up at 20:25. :)

p.s.: Didn't see @old sparks saw it too. I should update my browser windows more often.
 

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Are VHF elements parasitic when receiving UHF signals? I'm wondering, because there aren't any English-language digital transmitters on any real VHF channels around Ottawa, are there? I'm wondering if it's worthwhile investing in some of these UHF-only indoor antennas I'm finding.
I'm also wondering if these "amplified", "booster" and whatever else keywords are just synonyms for "pre-amp".
bump

Also, has anyone heard of an indoor TV antenna that clips onto the TV? I'm finding there are a few roles in which one (or a few) would be well-suited.
 

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Are VHF elements parasitic when receiving UHF signals?
VHF parasitic elements are designed to enhance VHF reception, but VHF elements can receive UHF signals if they are strong enough.
I'm wondering, because there aren't any English-language digital transmitters on any real VHF channels around Ottawa, are there?
In this sample report for postal code K2L 3A7 in Kanata I only see CKWS on VHF, and it's too weak to receive.
RabbitEars.Info

You can do your own signal report at this site (I use coordinates from Google Maps for the report):
RabbitEars.Info
I'm wondering if it's worthwhile investing in some of these UHF-only indoor antennas I'm finding.
Reception with an indoor antenna can be quite variable; you will just have to try it.
I'm also wondering if these "amplified", "booster" and whatever else keywords are just synonyms for "pre-amp".
The terms are often used interchangeably. In more precise terms, a preamp is mounted at the antenna and its power supply/power inserter is mounted inside. The preamp makes the signals stronger before they travel down the coax. A distribution amp is mounted inside to make the signals from the antenna stronger before splitting for more than one TV.

The term "amplified" is used when the amp is an integral part of the antenna.

The term "booster" is used for any amp.

If the signals at your location are similar to the signals in the sample report above, they are quite strong and might cause overload.. Start without an amp; more gain isn't always better.
 

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VHF parasitic elements are designed to enhance VHF reception, but VHF elements can receive UHF signals if they are strong enough.
True, but the question is, do the presence of VHF elements interfere w/the operation of the UHF elements? The reason I'm asking is that a UHF-only antenna might do better receiving UHF than a dual band antenna.
 

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bump

Also, has anyone heard of an indoor TV antenna that clips onto the TV? I'm finding there are a few roles in which one (or a few) would be well-suited.
For older TVs, there was plenty of room to place a rabbit ears (for VHF) and loop (for UHF) antenna on top. You can't easily do that with the flat panel TVs.
 

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True, but the question is, do the presence of VHF elements interfere w/the operation of the UHF elements? The reason I'm asking is that a UHF-only antenna might do better receiving UHF than a dual band antenna.
Your general question is going to get a general answer.

The elements for VHF reception will not ordinarily interfere with UHF reception, but it depends upon the actual design of the particular antenna.

Do you have a specific antenna that you are considering?
 

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For older TVs, there was plenty of room to place a rabbit ears (for VHF) and loop (for UHF) antenna on top. You can't easily do that with the flat panel TVs.
I know, that's kind of weird. I have a web cam that I can clip to my monitor. Are TV antennas so much more unwieldy that they can't be clipped onto a TV?

If VHF elements don't diminish the signal from UHF elements then that seems unusual for a dual band antenna.

I have a bunch that I am considering, then reconsidering, then deciding against, then returning to... everything's on the table. But a simple UHF that I could clip onto a TV's frame would probably find a customer in me.
 

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I know, that's kind of weird. I have a web cam that I can clip to my monitor. Are TV antennas so much more unwieldy that they can't be clipped onto a TV?
You are forcing me to imagine what it would look like.

A simple single UHF element probably wouldn't damage a panel type TV. A larger UHF antenna with more gain would probably damage the screen because the surround of the newer panel TVs is much narrower. The instructions caution you not to put any pressure on the screen when you are setting up the TV.

I don't understand why you are so focused on attaching the antenna to the TV when there are so many other options. But it is, after all, your choice.
If VHF elements don't diminish the signal from UHF elements then that seems unusual for a dual band antenna.
Not at all. A UHF/VHF combp antenna usually contains a device called a UVSJ (UHF-VHF Separator-Joiner) that keeps the bands separate so that they don't interfere with each other.
I have a bunch that I am considering, then reconsidering, then deciding against, then returning to... everything's on the table. But a simple UHF that I could clip onto a TV's frame would probably find a customer in me.
Since you haven't shown us your signal report or shown us what indoor antenna you are considering, the only advice I can give you is to try one of the antennas while keeping in mind that all locations for the antenna are not equal. You need to find the best location for the antenna by the empirical method, AKA trial-and-error.

Bonne chance
 

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I don't understand why you are so focused on attaching the antenna to the TV when there are so many other options. But it is, after all, your choice.
Well one reason is that I have a mounted TV so there no horizontal surface to place an antenna.

Not at all. A UHF/VHF combp antenna usually contains a device called a UVSJ (UHF-VHF Separator-Joiner) that keeps the bands separate so that they don't interfere with each other.
Which one would think causes some desens.

Since you haven't shown us your signal report or shown us what indoor antenna you are considering, the only advice I can give you is to try one of the antennas while keeping in mind that all locations for the antenna are not equal. You need to find the best location for the antenna by the empirical method, AKA trial-and-error.
I'd rather not telegraph my location, but let's say that in one place in this house, I can just about always get all the English, Canadian, digital channels that I used to get with a roof mount when I lived in Almonte. The report says that all these transmitters are at 25° or 110° magnetic. The above-mentioned antenna is pointed at about 110° pointed right at a window about 10' away. But there's also that mounted TV I was talking about. I also have a Tablo which has a booster (or whatever) so it's less sensitive. While the Tablo doesn't need to be near a TV (it just needs a TV and wi-fi signals) its setup is awkward with a USB drive I'm tow. So, as you can see, I've got a lot to think about and if a UHF-only antenna gives me an edge, it would could be a worthwhile investment.
 
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