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I know that most of you are shooting with a Nikon or Canon but with the E-620 I have to options of 16x9, 6x6, 4x3, 3x2 (not sure about Canon or Nikon options). Just wondering what would be the best aspect to shoot in?

I have mostly been shooting in LF+RAW at 16x9 but if I want to print a 3x5 photo then the photo will be altered to fit onto the paper but there is no aspect that is 3x5 or 6x9. When the photo is printed it looks perfect but I am just interested to see if there would be a better aspect I shoot in. I have also tired 6x6, I haven't printed any of those pics yet but I don't think I will be happy with them when I do get around to printing them.
 

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The eVolt 620 has a sensor 4032 x 3024 pixels so the native aspect ratio is 2x3 like most DSLRs. Most of these other aspect ratio modes are gimmicks to facilitate printing JPEGs and they throw away pixels to crop to a specific aspect ratio. Sensors in point-and-shoot cameras are typically a 4x3 aspect ratio which, strangely doesn't fit a common print size like 5x7 easily so they usually are cropped. A DSLR's 3x2 aspect ratio fits perfectly on a 4x6 (which is the size most photolabs are set to).

Common photo print sizes are:
4x6 (2x3)
5x7
8x10 (4x5)
11x14
16x20 (5x4)

These sizes are left-overs from the film days where a 35mm film camera had the 3x2, a 5" x 7" was a common negative size for medium format cameras and large format "View" cameras were the larger sizes.

So if you have to crop the picture to print anyway then I would suggest shooting at the native aspect ratio. Having said that I do find the 2x3 mask on my G10 is useful for framing images that I will print at 4x6 so I get the image to fill the frame without going over the print borders.

This aspect ratio confusion continues into Digital Photo frames where some have a 4x3 (sort of) aspect ration similar to a point-and-shoot sensor and others match a DSLR's sensor with a 2x3 (sort of again) aspect ratio.
 

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The operating manual of many cameras also indicate how many pixels are used for each format, so you can choose based on that, in consideration of what you expect to print or view most.

For example, even though on my Panasonic point/shoot the most pixels are in the 4:3 mode, the 3:2 mode has more horizontal pixels and if I wish to print or view in the 3:2 mode I will have more pixels shooting in that mode, rather than cropping to 3:2 from 4:3. The same holds for 16:9 if that's what I ultimately want. For example, my horizontal resolution is 3456 pixels for 4:3, but 3712 for 16:9, with 3:2 in between.

Of course the number of vertical pixels is less in the wider format, however, if ultimately the wider format is what I want, I'm better shooting in that format than cropping from 4:3 (although there is not a huge difference)

This is only an example from my Panasonic DMC-TZ5 - YMMV. I shoot 3:2 - I'm used to it from film cameras.
 

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The eVolt 620 has a sensor 4032 x 3024 pixels so the native aspect ratio is 2x3 like most DSLRs.
Sorry, but wrong. Olympus dSLR cameras are all 4:3 aspect ratio (1.33). It even states that on the link you provided!

Anyways, if you are shooting in RAW, then use the camera's native 4:3 ratio, since all other aspect ratios are just software conversions/crops anyways. If you shoot in the 4:3 aspect ratio, you will have the max data from which to do your own crops to other formats if you so desire. On the other hand, if you are shooting a whole bunch of snaps for 4x6 prints, then it may save you time to shoot in 3:2 mode.
 

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Sorry, but wrong. Olympus dSLR cameras are all 4:3 aspect ratio (1.33). It even states that on the link you provided!
My bad
Anyways, if you are shooting in RAW, then use the camera's native 4:3 ratio, since all other aspect ratios are just software conversions/crops anyways. If you shoot in the 4:3 aspect ratio, you will have the max data from which to do your own crops to other formats if you so desire. On the other hand, if you are shooting a whole bunch of snaps for 4x6 prints, then it may save you time to shoot in 3:2 mode.
The problem, as I stated, with shooting in 4:3 when your target print is 3:2 is that you may frame it with not enough headroom at the top or bottom so when you go to crop it you run in to issues.
 
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