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nice. I could not find a buyer and decided it was better for the environment to recycle my old TV rather than throw it in the dumpster like other people on my street have chosen to do.
 

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"A lot of professional "de-clutter" experts recommend getting rid of items that haven't been used for a year."

Every time I see this line, I wonder whether they include your fire insurance policy. For many farmers, and probably some other people, the concept of "insurance" includes keeping every piece of scrap metal. Even they generally draw the line at obsolete consumer electronics, though.

On the other hand, some things last long enough to make the transition from junk to antique. Anything from carnival glass to Model T Fords. Sometimes, it even happens with electronics. Vacuum-tube stereos, early game consoles, and juke boxes come to mind. The problem is, most of it probably won't and we won't live long enough to find out if the stuff we saved will.

I wonder if my slide rule will be valuable when a solar flare fries all the digital computers.
 

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Slide rules are valuable - just look at the prices on eBay. Some go for $100 or more.

CRT TV's on the other hand won't be valuable until we are all dead and most are destroyed.
 

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Slide rules are valuable - just look at the prices on eBay. Some go for $100 or more.
I still have the one I bought when I started high school. It cost me $2 back then. I wonder what it's worth now. ;)
 

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I have an expensive slide rule that was given to me in the early 1970s. It was a couple of years before portable calculators became affordable and popular (and slide rules became history.) I remember seeing a few people with calculators when I first started using it. It included a leather case (also in very good condition) and is good to four digits. Most slide rules at the time were only good for three digits. Most of the courses I took emphasized theory, not numeric results, so its use was limited. Then it got put in a drawer for 40 years. I had a working $20 calculator that dated to the 1970s as well. Tossed it in the recycling a year or two ago.

Working used TVs are a hot item in thrift stores (if they get that far.) My experience is that TVs and other electronics that need minor repairs can be sold to people who can fix them. I get a few $ and so does the purchaser once it's fixed. It's not worth spending $100-$200 to get some sets fixed but a tech can make a few $ on the side by fixing them. I see lots of broken electronics on eBay being sold for parts. It the display on a TV is in good condition, chances are it can be fixed.
 

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I have a 32 inch Sony Wega and it is still in use in our bedroom. Weight is 175 lbs. From a picture quality standpoint it still in some ways produces a better picture than my 65 inch 4K-HDR LCD Sony. If only CRTs could have been made light but strong enough to be used for today's large and wide screen sizes.
 

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I have an expensive slide rule that was given to me in the early 1970s. It was a couple of years before portable calculators became affordable and popular (and slide rules became history.) I remember seeing a few people with calculators when I first started using it. It included a leather case (also in very good condition) and is good to four digits. Most slide rules at the time were only good for three digits. Most of the courses I took emphasized theory, not numeric results, so its use was limited. Then it got put in a drawer for 40 years. I had a working $20 calculator that dated to the 1970s as well. Tossed it in the recycling a year or two ago.

Working used TVs are a hot item in thrift stores (if they get that far.) My experience is that TVs and other electronics that need minor repairs can be sold to people who can fix them. I get a few $ and so does the purchaser once it's fixed. It's not worth spending $100-$200 to get some sets fixed but a tech can make a few $ on the side by fixing them. I see lots of broken electronics on eBay being sold for parts. It the display on a TV is in good condition, chances are it can be fixed.
I am getting into just that myself right now. While no expert, working my way up in experience.
I am working on cleaning, repairing and refurbishing old video game consoles.

I recently got someone who dropped off a bin of 5 'broken' systems.
Out of the 5, I was able to get 4 of them back up and working fully fine.
Worst part was that they were in a heavy smokers, look like garage. It took a lot of work to get the smoke out, but again a littler perseverance, cant smell it at all anymore.
I was able to get 2 system I didnt own, and trade the other two off for systems I didnt.


The sale on broken stuff... is such a mixed bag.
Occasionally you come across someone just wanting to get a few $, which is great.
But there are a lot of people selling stuff. Say a $200 item new.. which normally used should be 100-120$ used tops maybe? Trying to still sell it at like $100 broken.
You see this a lot with PHONES. Something like an iPhone 6, with a cracked screen, and they are still trying to get $350 for it.
 

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If working on old game systems, you need a good old CRT TV to test them on - some newer TV's won't recognize the RF signals, and some people ditch the consoles thinking they don't work.

A tip I have for the smoke smell is to dismantle the case from the console, and run it through a dishwasher a few times - it will get rid of the built up smoke/residue on the exterior, clean out all the cracks, and look brand new (and smell neutral). The interior usually doesn't have much of a build up but the clean case will cover it up.

Wish I still had a good source of vintage consoles to work on - use to love working on Intellivisions, Ataris, and Colecovisions. Now all I can find is PS1/PS2s, X-Boxes/X-Box 360s, and Wiis - I don't care to work on them.
 

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While I generally use AV for convenience, I have yet to have a newer TV that wont work with the RF converter.
Biggest thing is the setup.. that newer TVs dont have all the channels pre set up and tuned to, etc.
Need to change it over to AIR, and to a scan, while the system is on, and it will find the channel.

But overall, an older CRT is a much better picture for it in either method.
 

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If anyone thinks that recycling electronics, plastics and paper is a good thing to do, recent evidence shows that it is more costly and worse for the environment. The way discarded electronics has been handled in the past causes environmental disasters in third world countries because they burn the nonmetalic components to recover the small amounts of precious metals they contain. Things like plastics, glass and paper are expensive to recycle and get burned or buried in landfills. Countries like China are closing their borders to first world waste and recycling companies cannot get rid of it. As a result, companies in the US are burying or burning toxic recycled products and poisoning residents who live nearby. Those toxins most likely travel north into Canada and to other areas.

Another factor is that, apart from certain metals, it costs more to recycle most materials. It also creates more greenhouse gases and global climate change due to the extra handling they require. This goes for things like paper and plastics that lots of people proudly recycle in the belief that it is better for the environment and saves energy. They are wrong. We don't have the capability to effectively recycle most of what goes into our recycling bins. The only answer at the current time is to reduce the production of wasteful products and packaging and to bury what we cannot recycle economically or effectively. That includes just about anything except a few valuable metals such as aluminum and copper. Unfortunately, oil companies are ramping up production of plastic packaging products instead of developing more sustainable and environmentally friendly materials.

The following article is just the latest recycling fiasco. There are other examples including toxic waste zones in third world countries due to inadequate recycling methods. India is the leading country in safe recycling technology but it's expensive to safely recycle products that contain toxic chemicals and first world countries don't want to pay the price. They would rather just dump their waste in poor countries or, in the case of US cities, poor neighborhoods.

'Moment of reckoning': US cities burn recyclables after China bans imports
 

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As someone with experience in the industry, the only items that get recycled are steel, aluminum, and clear glass.

Anything else just gets dumped back in the landfill - you are wasting time sorting it, your municipality is wasting time sorting it, and all the extra work is for nothing and you end up paying more for the material to end up in the same place or dumping it on some poorer country/neighbourhood.

I'm starting to see a movement in some areas of the U.S. where they are stopping the myth of recycling, and either limiting it to actual materials they can recycle, or eliminating the blue box all together.

Other materials, like paper and certain plastics are recycled, but the industries have enough in their own loops to recycle that they don't need you dirty/contaminated materials back that take lots of money and time to sort and clean when they have better sources.

There is too much greenwashing in Canada - I wish that there was real facts for people.
 
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