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... more pictures of my salvaged / found Granada radio ( forum allows 4 pictures max per post )









[ Looking at the schematic sticker on the bottom, looks like it has 8 transistors and 6 diodes. ]

I have carefully steamed and removed the schematic sticker on the bottom, and scanned it best I could,
but that file is pretty large and cannot be posted to the forum - I do not think.

The schematic scan came out not bad at say 600 dpi or 1200 dpi and medium or high sharpness enhanced.
Also ... steaming it sort of diluted / washed away the brown stain and made it all light brown - small sticker, but scan is readable.

I feel like I'm into some sort of "Radio ART / History PRESERVATION" or something.
I see the post is quite old (2013), but I recently got the exact same radio from a garage sell. Same as yours no indication of model number or year of manufacturing. Have you ever got more info about this radio?
 

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Well compared the the radios we are posting the thead is not old.

is your radio in working order?

you should post pic's of it's it's always welcome.
 

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My sister found this at a local shop, and thought I might like it. It was made in USA in 1961, has 6 Germanium Transistors, and 1 germanium detector diode.
I had to make a home made 9V battery that would fit in the battery compartment using
6 lithium watch batteries. I removed the 9V battery clip someone had wired in there,
since a modern 9V battery doesn't fit. I was listening to WBZ from Boston and some other station from Kentucky earlier... Seems to work pretty good for 1961.
Gonna keep it around to aid finding man made noise sources around the house.



 

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I can tell you that that type of 9v battery where used in old cameras so maybe a camera shop could help you.
Years ago i had a very very old Polaroid camera that used the same battery.

tell me how you use it to find am noise I have a friend that could use that. he thinks it's thermos pump and plasma tv doing the noise at his place but I have same setup and no noise.

Thanks for updating are old post.
 

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Seems to work pretty good for 1961.
Those 1960s 6-transistor radios worked well. Although 6 transistors seems ludicrous in a time when portable devices have chips with millions of transistors, they were analog and only needed a few components.The 6-transistor portable radio was the most popular design at the time and were Sony's flagship mobile product in the 1960s, well before cassette players and their Walkman products. The main weakness with these radios was the audio quality from the low power audio output stage and the low quality speaker. Cheaper transistor radios only had 4 or fewer transistors and didn't work as well. Germanium transistors had a tendency to fail due to heat and were only suitable for low power devices. Silicon transistors became mainstream a few years after 1961.
 

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tell me how you use it to find am noise I have a friend that could use that. he thinks it's thermos pump and plasma tv doing the noise at his place but I have same setup and no noise.
Frank, These little transistor radios, and nearly all modern AM radios use a ferrite loop antenna, that has a pattern similar to a dipole. Meaning it has nulls at the ends of the loop, and two main lobes broadside to the loop. Since they are portable, just aim the broadside of the loop towards a suspect source of AM interference (IX), and tune thru the range... Say start by aiming one around your modern LCD TV, almost guaranteed you'll find some noise in the area surrounding the Screen, and in the rear of the set. Or some modern LED Bulbs. Once you locate a source, you can play around turning the radio, to get a feel for how the ferrite loop stick is oriented inside. It's normal to find sources where the radio has to be very close to the appliance to pick it up. It's the ones that ya can hear from the other side of the room or the other side of the house that are problematic. Those are the ones ya wanna find and eliminate. The advantage to using a battery operated radio is two fold.
1.) Your not dragging an AC extension cord around the house. 2.) Since your running on Batteries, you can be assured your test radio
isn't picking up anything from "conducted" sources over the same AC Wiring in the house as what you are looking for.
 
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