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Discussion Starter #1
I agree that the selection is not very good. One problem is the separate licensing of movies and TV shows in Canada. Netflix is partly owned by several US TV networks, some of which which are owned by movies studios, so access to network and studio owned content is pretty much a given. With Canada's separate network ownership and content licensing, access is restricted by Canada's protectionist broadcasting laws, whether Netflix is directly regulated or not. The US studios and networks could try and license broadcast and streaming rights separately but that would create increased tension with Canadian broadcasters and regulators. As long as Canada's strict protectionism prevails, it's pretty much a lose-lose situation for both Netflix and Canadians.
 

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Netflix is partly owned by several US TV networks
I think you're confusing Netflix with Hulu.

Netflix is a publicly traded company owned by a combination of institutions and mutual funds. The institutional owners include Fidelity, BlackRock, Goldman Sachs and Fisher Investments. Mutual fund owners include Fidelity Contrafund, Hussman Strategic Growth Fund and Vanguard Mid-Cap Index Fund.

Hulu is operated independently by a dedicated management team with offices in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and Beijing. NBC Universal, News Corp., The Walt Disney Company, Providence Equity Partners and the Hulu team share in the ownership stake of the company.
 

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access is restricted by Canada's protectionist broadcasting laws
Broadcasting laws and the CRTC have nothing to do with what Netflix can or cannot show in Canada. The Canadian distribution rights are sold by the American Studios to Canadian broadcasters or distributors. Netflix Canada must negotiate different licenses than what Netflix US has.
 

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Netflix Canada must negotiate different licenses than what Netflix US has.
That's my point. Canadian broadcasters have purchased the Canadian rights and are not about to allow Netflix or Hulu to stream TV content in Canada. In the US, the studios and networks are often owned by the same people so they see Netfix and Hulu as extra revenue streams. Canadian broadcasters just see them as competition and are using Canada's protectionist system to stop them from streaming programming.

I think you're confusing Netflix with Hulu.
Noted. I wonder when Hulu is coming to Canada? (Rhetorical question.)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Apple sells content, not streaming for a flat rate. Apple's model is closer to DVDs with different delivery. Netflix and Hulu are more like BDUs with VOD.
 

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Is this a real contractual and legal separation between the two or something you made up? You have inside information to know for sure?
 

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That's my point. Canadian broadcasters have purchased the Canadian rights and are not about to allow Netflix or Hulu to stream TV content in Canada. In the US, the studios and networks are often owned by the same people so they see Netfix and Hulu as extra revenue streams. Canadian broadcasters just see them as competition and are using Canada's protectionist system to stop them from streaming programming.
This has nothing to do with Canadian protectionism - it is the same for UK residents as Canadians. This is purely a business decision on the part of the US networks and the Canadian networks. It may turn out that the Canadian networks made the correct decision and the US networks are making a bad business decision by give away their product for free via web streaming on sites like Hulu.
 

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Is this a real contractual and legal separation between the two or something you made up?
Just look at the way the products are sold. With Apple iTunes, you buy a copy of the product for download and playback. Hulu and Netflix stream content. There are similar issues with other content providers that sell and/or stream content. On some of them, you can purchase certain products that cannot be streamed. Content purchases are usually not restricted for Canadians but streamed content is severely limited to Canadians, when compared to the US, or unavailable. Product sales and streaming are considered as separate rights by copyright holders and copyright law. Streaming is handled in a way that is very close to broadcasting. Downloads are treated in a manner similar to physical products such as DVDs and CDs.

This has nothing to do with Canadian protectionism - it is the same for UK residents as Canadians.
The UK is very protectionist in nature with broadcasting. Up until the late 1960s, the only broadcaster allowed was the government owned BBC. The only reason that changed was due to public pressure caused by pirate broadcasters. Canadian protectionism allows Canadian broadcasters to keep out competitors. Cable and satellite technology threatened that but with the help of the government, they have stopped most Canadians from watching popular US TV shows on US stations. Now that internet technology is improving, they are taking steps to prevent Canadians from watching streamed content. Protectionist Canadian laws and government policies allow this. Without those, there is nothing to stop US businesses from broadcasting or streaming directly to Canadians.

It may turn out that the Canadian networks made the correct decision and the US networks are making a bad business decision by give away their product for free via web streaming on sites like Hulu.
That's like saying they are giving it away by broadcasting it OTA or on BDUs. They are not giving it away. Streamed content is either financed by embedded advertising or royalty fees from the BDU or content provider. Some of it is also time limited in availability. Some people in the industry thought that selling and renting movies on tape or disk was a bad idea as well. What they didn't realize was that it would create new, lucrative revenue streams to support products that would otherwise fail at the box office. The same thing is happening with internet streaming. Short sighted, narrow minded industry executives are trying to hang on to their old business model instead of developing new ones.
 

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Now that internet technology is improving, they are taking steps to prevent Canadians from watching streamed content. Protectionist Canadian laws and government policies allow this. Without those, there is nothing to stop US businesses from broadcasting or streaming directly to Canadians.
I disagree - this is still an issue caused by the fact that US networks license their shows country by country. Therefore they do not own Canadian distribution rights and cannot (knowingly) allow Canadians to access it. I don't like it either but this has nothing to do with the CRTC or the Canadian government and everything to do with commercial contracts between the US and Canadian networks.

That's like saying they are giving it away by broadcasting it OTA or on BDUs. They are not giving it away. Streamed content is either financed by embedded advertising or royalty fees from the BDU or content provider. Some of it is also time limited in availability. Some people in the industry thought that selling and renting movies on tape or disk was a bad idea as well. What they didn't realize was that it would create new, lucrative revenue streams to support products that would otherwise fail at the box office. The same thing is happening with internet streaming. Short sighted, narrow minded industry executives are trying to hang on to their old business model instead of developing new ones.
But what new revenue streams are being created to make up the difference. If you are Rogers or Bell, who also happen to own some of the channels, you run the risk of losing a customer paying upwards of $50/month to Netflix where they are paying $8/month. Where do you make up that difference in revenue? I agree that this is frustrating but the alternative to hanging on to an old business model may be to move to no business model.
 

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Canadian protectionism allows Canadian broadcasters to keep out competitors. Cable and satellite technology threatened that but with the help of the government, they have stopped most Canadians from watching popular US TV shows on US stations. Now that internet technology is improving, they are taking steps to prevent Canadians from watching streamed content. Protectionist Canadian laws and government policies allow this. Without those, there is nothing to stop US businesses from broadcasting or streaming directly to Canadians.
I think you are twisting the issue around 180 degrees. Canadian providers have purchased the Canadian rights to the content. They own it. Netflix (and all content distributors) need to purchase the right to air/stream/sell or otherwise distribute said content in Canada. That's not protectionism, that's commercialism. The only exception is DVD/BD distribution because that isn't included in the rights that Canadian broadcasters buy. CTV/Global/etc are not going to pay producers the same rate for their content if it doesn't include certain rights. Netflix needs to negotiate with CTV and Global just as they do with CBS/NBC/abc and all the content producers in the US.

Netflix doesn't own the rights to air things in Canada because they haven't purchased those rights. Until they do, their content will remain unsatisfactory. There's not a whit of government policy or protectionist law in any of that.
 

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Just look at the way the products are sold. With Apple iTunes, you buy a copy of the product for download and playback.
No. Absolutely not. The 2nd generation Apple TV cannot download and store. Everything is streamed. That's why I asked for the specific contractual/legal definition/agreement or if it's something you're making up.
 

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@ScaryBob -
Matter of historical note: BBC was not the only TV network until the late '60s. ITV (Independent Television) started in London in 1955. They added to their network over the next few years - (My father worked for ITV in the early 60's)
 
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